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Posted: 4/19/2010 8:06:08 AM EST
that you pass your bags through? Well is there any kind of liscencing that the operator has to go
through in order to be able to operate one of those? Anyone know of any publications that must
be posted in the area where one of those is in use?

I am doing some research for an investigation that is ongoing where I work. I am trying to find out
weather or not the agency is following all the rules that they need to be. No I don't work at an air
port, I just work for the state of Texas.

Any info would be helpful.
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 1:27:03 PM EST
one more try.
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 1:29:13 PM EST
Dunno.

What I'm mildly interested in is how much radiation exposure do they provide?  Is walking through it like getting a chest x-ray at the Dr.'s office?  How about exposure to the operator?
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 1:57:56 PM EST
From what I've seen, all you need is a pulse.
I'm an occupationally exposed radiation worker.  I've been wearing a badge since 1988, and a copy of all my exposure reports.  
Just in case I have any more FLK's.
On the Island of Misfit Toys, I got a call from the folks at the air terminal, the LPO wanted to know what kind of dose the machine gives off, and where they could get some caution signs.
Then he asked if running a body could cause any harm.  Seems the MA's were running each other through the machine to see how it looks.
As far as I know there is no tracking mechanism in place to monitor exposure or ensure that folks running these machines are doing it properly.
Kind of scary once you think about it.  I asked a very pregnant TSA agent if she was badged since she worked so close to the entrance and exit of the machine.  She gave me a look and asked "Why?".  I guess ignorance is bliss.

Oh yeah, FLK.
Funny Looking Kid I have 2.
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 2:01:16 PM EST
I have seen people run electronic dosimeters on them by mistake, the ones we have put out about 60mr. At least that's what the ED said.

Training require is just what to look for pretty much, not rocket science. And outside of the box the radiation is just background. So is nothing to be really concern with. The box is shielded and the black belts that hang are enought to stop whatever is going on inside.
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 5:46:58 PM EST
check the TDH (texas dept of health)  website, every time I have to renew my license I see it on there.  As to wheather these guys have one, i dunno.  Maybe it only covers x-raying plane wings and metal welds.
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 5:59:19 PM EST




Quoted:

that you pass your bags through? Well is there any kind of liscencing that the operator has to go

through in order to be able to operate one of those? Anyone know of any publications that must

be posted in the area where one of those is in use?



I am doing some research for an investigation that is ongoing where I work. I am trying to find out

weather or not the agency is following all the rules that they need to be. No I don't work at an air

port, I just work for the state of Texas.



Any info would be helpful.




I dunno about liscensing, but there is testing and training. I didn't do TSA/airports, but did work with pretty much the same device. There was a requirement that said that once a year we had to take a class that covered radiation safety. I dunno if that was an agency regulation or a federal one as it's been two years since I've been involved in that stuff.



As for what had to be posted for us there was a 'no go' area marked with tape where people who didn't have a dosimeter on were not allowed to go (yeah, we had to wear one) and the usual "DANGER X-RAYS/RADIATION" signs. Can't recall exactly what they said but there was one on the machine.



ETA: Now that I think of it, I don't recall ever seeing any TSA guys wearing dosimeters.
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 6:16:41 PM EST
60 millirems isn't a bad dose (don't know the total overall time of exposure for the reading on the badge) for an exposure over the course of a work day. Are you talking about expousre inside or outside of the machine at a location you would be exposed during use of the machine? If you are talking about that much for each time you run something through the machine i would think that would add up pretty quick if you are busy. A 2 view chest x-ray exposure on an average sized adult male is about 250 millirems to the patient IIRC.

Maybe a basic operator's license is required.

Radiation safety- time, distance and shielding....
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 6:38:32 PM EST
Quoted:
60 millirems isn't a bad dose (don't know the total overall time of exposure for the reading on the badge) for an exposure over the course of a work day. Are you talking about expousre inside or outside of the machine at a location you would be exposed during use of the machine? If you are talking about that much for each time you run something through the machine i would think that would add up pretty quick if you are busy. A 2 view chest x-ray exposure on an average sized adult male is about 250 millirems to the patient IIRC.

Maybe a basic operator's license is required.

Radiation safety- time, distance and shielding....


I ran my badge through the machine several times a month.  I never came anywhere near the dose our fluoro techs with a heavy case load showed.  It wasn't anywhere close to hot.  These were monthly badges.

Airport systems take shots comparable with the lowest levels of a hospital x-ray or fluoro system.  

However, the dose allowable for a pregnant female is much lower.  

Most states have regulatory agencies for x-ray systems.  Give them a call.
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 6:46:09 PM EST
Quoted:
Quoted:
60 millirems isn't a bad dose (don't know the total overall time of exposure for the reading on the badge) for an exposure over the course of a work day. Are you talking about expousre inside or outside of the machine at a location you would be exposed during use of the machine? If you are talking about that much for each time you run something through the machine i would think that would add up pretty quick if you are busy. A 2 view chest x-ray exposure on an average sized adult male is about 250 millirems to the patient IIRC.

Maybe a basic operator's license is required.

Radiation safety- time, distance and shielding....


I ran my badge through the machine several times a month.  I never came anywhere near the dose our fluoro techs with a heavy case load showed.  It wasn't anywhere close to hot.  These were monthly badges.

Airport systems take shots comparable with the lowest levels of a hospital x-ray or fluoro system.  

However, the dose allowable for a pregnant female is much lower.  

Most states have regulatory agencies for x-ray systems.  Give them a call.


I'm pretty sure all of them do. The use of ionizing radiation is tightly regulated since it is considered a potential health hazard. Strange thing about flouro- never had any problem with it for surgery, but am extremely allergic to the routine studies. Go figure...

Link Posted: 4/19/2010 6:49:32 PM EST
They're Feds, they aren't subject to your pitiful state rules. Don't fuck with them or they'll make your life hell.



I'm completely honest about that and serious. Reality is that they are more equal than you and can bring a world of hurt down.
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 6:57:41 PM EST



Quoted:


Dunno.



What I'm mildly interested in is how much radiation exposure do they provide?  Is walking through it like getting a chest x-ray at the Dr.'s office?  How about exposure to the operator?


As a male you have zero to worry about.



Here you go



From the first info link on that page:




Q5: Is it safe to stand or walk near a cabinet x-ray system while it is producing x-rays?




A5: Yes. Manufacturers are required to
certify that their products meet the Federal radiation safety
performance standard for cabinet x-ray systems. Specifically, the
standard requires that the radiation emitted from a cabinet x-ray
system not exceed an exposure of 0.5 milliroentgens in one hour at any
point five centimeters from the external surface. Most cabinet x-ray
systems emit less than this limit. In addition, the standard also
requires safety features that include warning lights, warning labels,
and interlocks.




For comparison, the average person in the United States receives a
dose of about 360 millirem of radiation per year from background
radiation. (Note: 1 milliroentgen of exposure to x-rays will result in
approximately 1 millirem of dose. These terms are defined later in this
document.) Background radiation is radiation that is always present in
the environment. Eighty percent of that exposure comes from natural
sources: radon gas, the human body, outer space, rocks, and soil. The
remaining 20 percent comes from man-made radiation sources, primarily
medical x rays.




For additional information on certification and labeling, see Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1010. For the details of the cabinet x-ray performance standard see Title 21 CFR 1020.40.
For further information on recommended limits of radiation exposure, we
recommend the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements
Report 116, Limitation of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (1993).





 
Link Posted: 4/19/2010 6:58:01 PM EST
Quoted:
They're Feds, they aren't subject to your pitiful state rules. Don't fuck with them or they'll make your life hell.

I'm completely honest about that and serious. Reality is that they are more equal than you and can bring a world of hurt down.


Far be it from any of us to keep feds from getting their fair share of radiation exposure.
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