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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/31/2005 2:42:43 PM EDT
www.nola.com


Wednesday, August 31, 2005



Looting reports
5:13 p.m.

HELPPP from writes:

5851. BAPTIST HOSIPTAL EMERGENCY
by Jillybean82, 8/31/05 16:52 ET
Baptist hospital has been taken over with guns. it is horrible. I talked to my friend who is a nurse. she was screaming that is terrible. there are bodies just everywhere. people are stealing all there supplies.

i don't know how to get this information to the news station. This is first hand information.

there is 25ft of water in the hospital. Please please help.

- Jilljill0782@aol.com



Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:44:31 PM EDT
I'm not buying it.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:45:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thompsondd:
www.nola.com


Wednesday, August 31, 2005



Looting reports
5:13 p.m.

HELPPP from writes:

5851. BAPTIST HOSIPTAL EMERGENCY
by Jillybean82, 8/31/05 16:52 ET
Baptist hospital has been taken over with guns. it is horrible. I talked to my friend who is a nurse. she was screaming that is terrible. there are bodies just everywhere. people are stealing all there supplies.

i don't know how to get this information to the news station. This is first hand information.

there is 25ft of water in the hospital. Please please help.

- Jilljill0782@aol.com






So it's true, fuck.

Can't wait for the NG, DHS and everybody else to light these bitches up.

Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:46:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2005 2:47:10 PM EDT by thompsondd]

Originally Posted By Itchy:
I'm not buying it.



OK, don't


Emergency generators at Charity and University hospitals out of fuel

By Jan M oller
Staff writer

The emergency generators at Charity and University hospitals in downtown New Orleans ran out of fuel and shut down at 8 a.m. today, worsening an already intolerable situation for about 350 patients and more than 1,000 doctors, nurses and evacuees who sought shelter there.

Donald Smithburg, who heads Louisiana State University's Health Care Services Division, said he's been told that fuel is available a few blocks from the hospitals' downtown New Orleans campus, but that authorities have not yet figured out how to transport it through the flooded streets to the hospitals.


"It's my understanding that the fuel is nearby, it's just a problem of getting to it,'' Smithburg said. "I think the state is as frustrated as we are in findings ways to get it transported just a few blocks.''

The hospitals, which host the only Level 1 trauma center in southeast Louisiana and also serve as teaching hospitals for LSU's medical school, lost power during Katrina and lost use of their main emergency generator due to flooding. Since then, they had been receiving power from a number of smaller generators that have been used to support essential medical equipment.

It has no water, sewerage or air conditioning and the lights have not been used in an effort to conserve electricity, Smithburg said.

Although the trauma center was moved from ground level to a higher floor at Charity before the floodwaters set in, the waters are too high for the hospitals to admit any new patients, Smithburg said. Instead, the hospital is hoping to evacuate its patients to public hospitals in Alexandria, Lafayette, Shreveport, Lake Charles and Monroe.

Smithburg said disaster medical teams are en route to Louisiana from Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas, and that the charity system has enough physicians and other staff to handle the job. "I think it's not a question of having enough doctors and medics (in New Orleans). It's a question of getting the patients out of New Orleans,'' Smithburg said.

About 20 patients on ventilators were evacuated Tuesday around nightfall, Smithburg said.

Office of Homeland Security spokesman Mark Smith said Wednesday morning that Coast Guard and Department of Wildlife and Fisheries rescue workers are also focused on evacuating about 1,000 patients from Methodist Hospital.

The LSU hospitals in Bogalusa and Houma also suffered storm damage and will not be receiving evacuees, Smithburg said.

-Jan Moller




Wednesday, August 31, 2005
Peeling open a store
4:50 p.m.

Looters went to extraordinary means to get into the Rite Aid drug store on Carrollton Avenue and Oak Street in Uptown New Orleans, where metal storm doors were rolled shut on the doors and windows.

Looters commandered a fork lift, which they used to ram into the metal and peel open the protective covering to get inside the store. That allowed a steady stream of looters, many wheeling shopping carts, to stock up, primarily with food, candy, any soft drink or water or alcohol, and cigarettes.

After much of the store had been emptied, a pair of looters carrying handfuls of candy and chips stopped briefly to talk to a newspaper reporter.

"They still have come canned foods in there if you want some."

Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:47:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:49:31 PM EDT
Show me ONE credible source of looters with firearms taking hostages at ANY hospital. There isn't any. There is however, a place for lunatics to post crap to freak people out on that website.



Oh, and the sky is falling, the sky is falling.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:52:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2005 2:52:45 PM EDT by callgood]
If there is 25' of water in the hospital, does that mean the looters have their own Navy now?
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 2:54:18 PM EDT
Oh, if only Peter Jennings was around to report on this.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:03:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By callgood:
If there is 25' of water in the hospital, does that mean the looters have their own Navy now?



Looter SEALS.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:03:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:36:42 PM EDT
BS. I can't beleive an internet connection exists in all of New Orleans.

I understand there are major telco switches underwater or out of power in the whole region.

Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:57:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By entropy:
BS. I can't beleive an internet connection exists in all of New Orleans.

I understand there are major telco switches underwater or out of power in the whole region.




Depends. I've worked for companies with satellite capability if necessary.

Most of the major pipes come into cities in colo facilities completely separate of the telco COs. If this is located in a colo, then it's likely that he has a working fibre feed and barring that, could be online via satellite. As long as the buried fibre isn't broken and the other terminus of the buried fibre is working, there be internet.

With enough know-how, it's possible to get a nice network feed most anywhere.

Another possibility is that they are hosted in a DR site somewhere outside of NO and are connecting via one of the bajillions of ways one can upload data to a DR site.

I used to specialize in disaster recovery for datacenters - nowadays I'm building data centers, but yeah, it's not that hard to get internetted provided you are in the right place and you know what you are doing.
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