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Posted: 12/28/2003 12:57:22 PM EDT
I've always built my projects out of pine with a shellack or polyurathane (sp?) finish.  This time I've gotten adventurous & gone with oak.  It's for a kitchen microwave table, of that matters.
I'd like to do some kind of oil finish, as poly just doesn't seem right on oak.  Any suggestions on what type of oil to use in the kitchen?  It won't be getting food on it intentionally, but a little might get dropped on the way in or out of the microwave, and I need to be able to clean it.
Thanks in advance.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:13:31 PM EDT
It's hard for me to say without seeing it in the room. I think I'd put on a light cherry stain and top it off with a coat of sanding sealer. If you want the natural look the sealer alone would help protect the wood. Just my .02
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:15:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/28/2003 1:17:00 PM EDT by cyanide]
Tung oil, let the wood and character of the wood show.

[url]http://www.waterlox.com/tungoil.cfm[/url]
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:17:14 PM EDT
Golden oak stain. Clear coat with a satin finish, makes it easier to wipe clean.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:18:25 PM EDT
I'd rub it down w/ antique oil.



-HS
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:23:48 PM EDT
FWIW, no stain.  I don't believe in it.  In fact, I'm very much against it.  I bought oak 'cause I want it to look like oak.  If I wanted another look I'd buy that wood.

Don't worry about it in it's environment, it will be the high point of the room, but I want to be able to take it with me when I buy a place & have something nice.

That tung oil sounds like a good one cyanide, thanks.  I'll have to look for that.  Is that brand anything special or can I just use whatever I find at Lowes?
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:29:10 PM EDT
The problem with an oil finish (especially in the kitchen) is that if you drop something greasy on it or spill something, it will leave a stain.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:32:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Cougar8045:
The problem with an oil finish (especially in the kitchen) is that if you drop something greasy on it or spill something, it will leave a stain.
View Quote


Any other suggestions instead of the oil then?  will the sanding sealer be truly clear?  the problem with poly (I actually like it on pine) is that it colors the wood a bit.  I don't want to loose the look of the natural oak.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:42:45 PM EDT
Tung oil is an excellent finish.  It was used for Garands during WW II.  I've never noticed any spots or stains on my Garands, and heaven knows I've gotten a lot of oil on a lot of them. [:)]

Another finish I use is a product called Feed-N-Wax.  You can get it from Home Depot.  It's a mix of canuba oil, orange oil, and bees wax, and is an excellent "natural" finish.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:45:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By norman74:
FWIW, no stain.  I don't believe in it.  In fact, I'm very much against it.  I bought oak 'cause I want it to look like oak.  If I wanted another look I'd buy that wood.

Don't worry about it in it's environment, it will be the high point of the room, but I want to be able to take it with me when I buy a place & have something nice.

That tung oil sounds like a good one cyanide, thanks.  I'll have to look for that.  Is that brand anything special or can I just use whatever I find at Lowes?
View Quote


Any tung oil will do , as for dripping stuff on it, my son does all his boat wood in it, and it holds up quite well, under bird shit, acid rain, bugs, name it. Try it , I think you will like it. It hasn't been around since the 14 th century for no reason.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 1:53:44 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GunWares:
Another finish I use is a product called Feed-N-Wax.  You can get it from Home Depot.  It's a mix of canuba oil, orange oil, and bees wax, and is an excellent "natural" finish.
View Quote


that was something else I was pondering.  A friend of mine once built a lamp and finished it with some sort of wax, it looked amazing.
Only thing I'm worried about with wax is the toaster will also share this nook, and I don't want the finish to react to the heat that thing will give off.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 3:10:50 PM EDT
I bought oak and did the master bedroom in it.  I used minwax english oak.   I know the guy at the lumber yard real well, and he let me open some cans and put a little on some drops that I had.  This way I got the look that I wanted.  I then put a coat of minwax clear satin poly over it.  You might also want to investigate putting it on and wiping it off.  Putting it on and leaving it.  Putting it on twice.  Putting it on with a rag versus using a brush.  All these things make a difference.  Good luck.  Remember no one looks at the piece,  they look at the finish.  
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 3:58:35 PM EDT
The intended usage is quite important, IMO. The relatively large/open pores of oak will tend to capture minute pieces of material (food) and spilled liquid (e.g. oil, milk,...). Some time ago I did a solid oak tabletop with a Danish Oil. Looked great...had great texture...but truly sucked when it came time to clean.  For an oak piece that will see food spillage, I highly recommend sealing the piece first with poly or sanding sealer. A single coat shouldn't affect the texture and yet provide some degree of "easy cleaning". However...

For myself, I'd stain the thing and then "wrap" it in poly for easy cleaning despite the previously-mentioned downside(s) to that approach. For pieces that don't face the harshness of the kitchen, I'd go with a more non-filled application such as what others have suggested.

Just my .02 worth...I HATE trying to clean open-pored/unfilled wood used in kitchen applications.

Good luck,
Kevin
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 5:17:28 PM EDT
If food might come into contact with it, use mineral oil and rub in several coats. If food won't come into contact with it, use tung oil and apply several coats, buffing with 0000 steel wool between coats. You can certainly use polyurethane on oak, and it looks quite good actually. Use a stain under the poly if you wish. If you use polyurethane, food touching it won't be a problem. The best finish might be tung oil with a polyurethane overcoat after the oil has dried well.
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