Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 8/4/2009 9:03:10 AM EST
I love the look and the smell of wine but hate the taste. what a good wine that tastes good.. that wont break the bank..
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:06:06 AM EST
Red, white, or blush?

Tastes vary but if you want a decent wine that tastes good.

Crane - Merlot, Sauviogn(sp) Blanc or Chardonay

They are about $9 a bottle and wife loves them. I think they are decent too. YMMV
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:06:52 AM EST
German whites. specifically the "desert" wines like Spatlese and Gerwerstraminer.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:07:32 AM EST
Do a search for importers of German wine. Order yourself a couple bottles of Eiswein. Gooooooood shit. Spendy though.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:08:14 AM EST
Originally Posted By DvlDog:
German whites. specifically the "desert" wines like Spatlese and Gerwerstraminer.



Oh yeah, Spatelese and Auswese are a couple of my old favorites too.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:08:41 AM EST
manischewitz
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:09:11 AM EST
Reislings taste good IMO.

Columbia Cellarmasters Reisling is a wine everybody seems to like, at about $8/bottle.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:11:06 AM EST
looking for something to go with spegetti or lazagna..
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:11:13 AM EST
It always depends on what you are eating, but I've found Reisling to be a nice white wine that doesn't overpower you with an alcoholic haze. I've tried several brands, all of which were pleasant; the only one I can name offhand is Chateau Ste. Michelle, which won't break the bank. Most people will probably tell you to start with Chardonnay, but personally, I'm not a big fan.

I've found wine to be much more enjoyable with food. Cabernet Sauvignon, for example, can be overwhelming by itself, but pairing it with red meat allows you to appreciate the subtleties of the flavor.

I'm self-taught, however, so my assessment might horrify a proper wine snob.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:11:47 AM EST
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
looking for something to go with spegetti or lazagna..




Um, that would be beer.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:12:09 AM EST
Originally Posted By K2QB3:
Reislings taste good IMO.

Columbia Cellarmasters Reisling is a wine everybody seems to like, at about $8/bottle.


Shucks, beat me to it.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:14:16 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:14:32 AM EST
Actually, if you're not a wine drinker and you're not trying to impress anybody, there's nothing wrong with the "wine products" located next to the boxes in most stores.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:15:05 AM EST
Originally Posted By cowboy7242001:
Arbor Mist



^THAT'S what I was thinking of but couldn't remember the name.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:15:53 AM EST
How about Welch's?
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:16:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 9:18:24 AM EST by journeyman01]
Originally Posted By grywlf52:
Red, white, or blush?

Tastes vary but if you want a decent wine that tastes good.

Crane - Merlot, Sauviogn(sp) Blanc or Chardonay

They are about $9 a bottle and wife loves them. I think they are decent too. YMMV


It all deepends but I would say a chianti is a nice lite red whine. The Merlots and Sauviogns tend to be very strong. For those people who don't drink whine a good Merlot will fuck you up real quick.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:16:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 9:17:31 AM EST by MadnessReigns]

Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
looking for something to go with spegetti or lazagna..

Pinot Grigio.

Zinfadel, Pinot Noir are good reds. I never like red wines until I tried those.

Riesling is a dessert wine, very sweet.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:21:46 AM EST
The wife and I have taken a liking to Schlink Haus, Red Wine, Sweet. That is all it says on the label. I really like it with pasta. I prefer it slightly chilled.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:24:02 AM EST
Duh! Boones Farm!
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:24:13 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:24:48 AM EST
Go through your local table wines.

They are usually cheaper than bottled water and it's a matter of finding one you like. As you develop a taste, you can work up in that family of wines.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:26:16 AM EST
Originally Posted By teveler:
Duh! Boones Farm!


whoohoo strawberry fields!!

DTDT have teh pictures of me looking evil!
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:27:56 AM EST
With Spag or Lasagna I would suggest a medium body red. Maybe a Merlot, Pinot Noir or Chianti.

Me, I like Cabernet-Sauvignon. Bit fuller in body and drier.

If you want something sweet, maybe a dessert wine like a Muscato or one of the German wines posted above would be more your style.

Really you need to try them out. Sort of like finding out what beers, liquors, handguns, or ammo you like.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:28:26 AM EST
BV Syrah, any vintage. Runs about 10 to 12 a bottle at BevMo.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:29:00 AM EST
Just about any brand of Lambrusco. Goes great with picnic foods, Italian food. Bread and cheese, what have you. It's red and on the sweet side. It doesn't have to be expensive or praised by wine snobs for me to like it. The Amish here in Ohio make excellent table wines as well.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:29:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
I love the look and the smell of wine but hate the taste. what a good wine that tastes good.. that wont break the bank..


Uh...Bud Light maybe?

Seriously though, it takes a while to find your wine "taste". Best advice I ever got was "treat wine as a food item, not a drink". Experiment with foods you really like and find wines that taste, and yes, "feel" good with them. IMO, wine is not a thirst quencher, but a liquid "food" product that can make an otherwise ordinary meal....extraordinary. With some minor exceptions, price means NOTHING with wine. The best one is the one YOU like. Period.

Remember this as well...wine changes every year. Your favorite "brand" this year might not be so great next year. You will have to continue to try different things and check reviews on certain vintages that you're interested in.

I can remember the actual moment that I "got it", in regard to wine drinking. I was at the 13 Coins restaurant in Seattle with my father (1982) and enjoying some Fettucini Alfredo w/sausage and shrooms. Dad ordered a Cabernet (can't remember the vineyard) and as soon as that stuff hit my buds along with a bite of chow....I was hooked forever. It's all about the food man...the food!

Wow. Haven't told that story in a while. Happy hunting. Wish I could experience the "first time" again!
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:30:41 AM EST
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
looking for something to go with spegetti or lazagna..


I would suggest something red.
If you don't like wine make it a lighter style of red.
My suggestion would be a Pinot Noir.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:32:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 9:32:49 AM EST by gamesniper]
Sterling Vineyards Zinfandel.

NOT white zinfandel!!!!!!!

It'll set you back $9.00-$12.00
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:33:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By kittyhawk63:
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
I love the look and the smell of wine but hate the taste. what a good wine that tastes good.. that wont break the bank..


Uh...Bud Light maybe?

Seriously though, it takes a while to find your wine "taste". Best advice I ever got was "treat wine as a food item, not a drink". Experiment with foods you really like and find wines that taste, and yes, "feel" good with them. IMO, wine is not a thirst quencher, but a liquid "food" product that can make an otherwise ordinary meal....extraordinary. With some minor exceptions, price means NOTHING with wine. The best one is the one YOU like. Period.

Remember this as well...wine changes every year. Your favorite "brand" this year might not be so great next year. You will have to continue to try different things and check reviews on certain vintages that you're interested in.

I can remember the actual moment that I "got it", in regard to wine drinking. I was at the 13 Coins restaurant in Seattle with my father (1982) and enjoying some Fettucini Alfredo w/sausage and shrooms. Dad ordered a Cabernet (can't remember the vineyard) and as soon as that stuff hit my buds along with a bite of chow....I was hooked forever. It's all about the food man...the food!

Wow. Haven't told that story in a while. Happy hunting. Wish I could experience the "first time" again!


actually on a business trip to WA I was treated to dinner.. Swordfish and some wine that was 80+ a bottle.. its was GOOD OMG it was good!! but 80 a bottle is a bit out of my range..
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:35:21 AM EST
Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
looking for something to go with spegetti or lazagna..


I would suggest something red.
If you don't like wine make it a lighter style of red.
My suggestion would be a Pinot Noir
.


Excellent advice.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:37:23 AM EST
I've turned several non-wine-drinkers into vinophiles by introducing them to a Moscato d'Asti. They are whites, lower in alcohol, and very sweet. Can be a little hard to find, but easily one of my favorites. Pinot Gris is usually a good choice as well, another white.

Or Boone's Farm. I get a buddy a couple bottles of that every year, cuz us Texas rednecks is too dumb to be drinkin' that fancy water with them French names.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:37:41 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 9:44:01 AM EST by TrojanMan]
Originally Posted By leatherpuke:
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
looking for something to go with spegetti or lazagna..




Um, that would be beer.


Any food pairing, actually.

For pasta with red sauce, the general wisdom is something herbal/hoppy that resonates with the sauce (which is usually made with basil, paprika, onions, garlic and so on) or something like a sweet and heavier that will offer a counterpoint to the acidity of the tomatoes. In rare cases, you can find something like a malty double IPA that can do both. DFH's 90 minute or one of the "Belgian IPAs" (I recommend the Achouffe offering, Houblon Chouffe) are great examples. Side note: "Houblon" is Flemish for both hops and bumblebee. Just FYI, I suppose.

Where the acid componnt is more subtle either by using less sauce (such as pizza) or by blending with cream as in like a blush sauce, you can steer towards drier or spicier beers. English Brown ale with pepperoni pizza or Belgian tripel with tomato-chunked alfredo for examples.

Lazagna, depending on how you make it, can be more towards the cheesy, meaty or tomato-y realms.

There are no bad choices, necessarily, but only you know exactly how your version of it will pair with certain beverages. For a very balanced lazagna, I'm going to suggest a bit of a wild card with Ommegang's Rare Vos (Roughly translated, "Wild Fox"). It's technically a Belgin Amber Ale, but it's got some nice carmel flavors that push it towards Bruin (Brown) territory. It's very smooth & rich with light but noticable spice and the finish is herbally cleansing which will balance with the lazagna quite well. I wouldn't recommend it with a high-acid version of the dish, though, so just be aware of that. With the savoriness of your average lazagna, I think it's money.


I've highlighted the recommended brands, but be sure to explore the style if you happen to have a local offering.

Bon chance.


ETA: I just noticed you're in Oregon and you're asking for wine pairings. You live in what is perhaps the brewing capital of the US. Flex some local pride.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:39:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
Originally Posted By kittyhawk63:
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
I love the look and the smell of wine but hate the taste. what a good wine that tastes good.. that wont break the bank..


Uh...Bud Light maybe?

Seriously though, it takes a while to find your wine "taste". Best advice I ever got was "treat wine as a food item, not a drink". Experiment with foods you really like and find wines that taste, and yes, "feel" good with them. IMO, wine is not a thirst quencher, but a liquid "food" product that can make an otherwise ordinary meal....extraordinary. With some minor exceptions, price means NOTHING with wine. The best one is the one YOU like. Period.

Remember this as well...wine changes every year. Your favorite "brand" this year might not be so great next year. You will have to continue to try different things and check reviews on certain vintages that you're interested in.

I can remember the actual moment that I "got it", in regard to wine drinking. I was at the 13 Coins restaurant in Seattle with my father (1982) and enjoying some Fettucini Alfredo w/sausage and shrooms. Dad ordered a Cabernet (can't remember the vineyard) and as soon as that stuff hit my buds along with a bite of chow....I was hooked forever. It's all about the food man...the food!

Wow. Haven't told that story in a while. Happy hunting. Wish I could experience the "first time" again!


actually on a business trip to WA I was treated to dinner.. Swordfish and some wine that was 80+ a bottle.. its was GOOD OMG it was good!! but 80 a bottle is a bit out of my range..


Almost forgot....wine prices in restaurants are actually 2-4 times the cost of the SAME bottle at the store. Just the way it is.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:43:49 AM EST
Ecco Domani Chianti for spagehtti. You might also want to try Barefoot wines. Usually around 5 bux a bottle and suprisingly drinkable.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:46:24 AM EST
Beringer White Merlot. Its sweet, slightly darker than pink and goes pretty well with about anything. Serious wine people will turn up their nose at it, but I really enjoy it from time to time.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:47:41 AM EST
for those new to wine or claiming not to like it, i've found something similar to the following to be well received. noticeable flavor and slightly sweet - it's easy to drink. should be available almost everywhere:



for spaghetti or lasagna that involves a red sauce, some type of red blend would probably be a safe choice. something like cline cellers red truck red, perhaps.


an ideal match would consider the intensity of the flavors in the sauce and ensure the wine is not overwhelmed or does not dominate.




Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:49:32 AM EST
Originally Posted By Tim_the_enchanter:
Just about any brand of Lambrusco. Goes great with picnic foods, Italian food. Bread and cheese, what have you. It's red and on the sweet side. It doesn't have to be expensive or praised by wine snobs for me to like it. The Amish here in Ohio make excellent table wines as well.


This
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:50:31 AM EST
Empty the cheap wine bottle, put some whisky in. Repeat as necessary.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:53:38 AM EST
Almost any Chianti. Its a light flavored Italian wine. It smells wonderful, it is not over bearing (some taste like strong grape juice), and it sounds fancy but never costs too much. It's just about the only wine I really enjoy
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:54:38 AM EST
I hate wine myself....however, I did try a white that was drinkable...

As mentioned above, if you look for the German wines that are labeled "Spatlese" (LATE harvest...as explained to me by a wine/liquor store owner)...the grapes have a higher sugar content at fermenting, making for a sweeter wine.

Not sure on the Italian, French, etc. designations for the same thing.

I like Beer of all varieties though....


AFARR
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:57:10 AM EST
Cant go wrong with Black Tower.

Publix stores here sell it, 'bout $10 for a good sized bottle.

Great with seafood, especially shellfish.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 10:09:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By 2nd_amandment:
Empty the cheap wine bottle, put some whisky in. Repeat as necessary.


WOOT! brown party liquor!
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 10:10:07 AM EST
Originally Posted By 556A2:
Originally Posted By Tim_the_enchanter:
Just about any brand of Lambrusco. Goes great with picnic foods, Italian food. Bread and cheese, what have you. It's red and on the sweet side. It doesn't have to be expensive or praised by wine snobs for me to like it. The Amish here in Ohio make excellent table wines as well.


This


Thirded
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 10:11:55 AM EST
A Gewuztraminer (sp) excellent wine with a crisp light flavor.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 10:14:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 1:27:15 PM EST by ohiobr]
Moscato is awesome. It's very light and sweet.

A giant bottle of sutter home costs like $10

The imported Moscato d'Asti goes from $20-$40 a bottle.


I'm not a wine person at all and my pallet has all the sophistication of that of a 90 year old man with a 2 pack a day habit. However, I can taste a difference and prefer the Italian over the Californian. Though i usually end up with the domestic stuff because it's cheaper and easier to find.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 10:24:53 AM EST
Go find a local winery in OR and do some tastings. Or find a local wine tasting given by some businesses or local wine club. The Williamette valley has plenty of good wineries to explore.
It's pretty useless to give you recommendations when you say you don't like the taste. It's a bit of an acquired taste. You should look at the sweeter wines to begin. You can also sometimes buy samplers of wine online.

Oregon Wines
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 11:07:51 AM EST
I dislike the taste of oak, so for me, a stainless casked wine is what I like.

I enjoy a nice Mouton Cadet, in either the red or white incarnation. Though, I like the white a little better.

My roommate gets Stump Jump, which is pretty good too.

Your best bet is to spend $10 on a bottle each time you stock up on groceries, and find one you like. I'd bet there is an "arfcom of wine" somewhere, that has a good guide, too.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 11:16:25 AM EST
Yellowtail. - Austrailian I think.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 11:18:04 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 11:20:14 AM EST by TLyledesign]
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 11:21:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By TLyledesign:
whoa! too big...hang on...



That what my wife says too!
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 1:00:42 PM EST
Originally Posted By ohiobr:
Moscato is awesome. It's very light and sweet.

I giant bottle of sutter home costs like $10

The imported Moscato d'Asti goes from $20-$40 a bottle.



Another good suggestion. The Aussie Moscato is very good (and cheap) as well.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top