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Link Posted: 3/5/2017 8:11:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/5/2017 8:15:03 AM EST by RDak]
Here's a pretty good site on all things Woodsman.

The "Prewoodsman" was an unknown legendary expert on all things Colt Woodsman and his tricks of the trade are revealed in parts of that site, especially the "Repairs" section.

Here's a company with a lot of parts........some might be inhouse manufactured.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 8:13:49 AM EST
I have all three and they are great guns!

Link Posted: 3/5/2017 8:16:32 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MARINE-ORDIE:
I have all three and they are great guns!

http://i1142.photobucket.com/albums/n619/Ordo6502/IMG_20170305_080827400_zpsxmd7pwyg.jpg
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You might want to let the OP know where he can find parts.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 8:19:20 AM EST
Tagged to see how this progresses 
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 8:21:45 AM EST
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Originally Posted By glorifiedG:

That's a real possibility, those were never cheap enough for someone to just toss because they didn't like it.
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Originally Posted By glorifiedG:
Originally Posted By triburst1:
Cool find. Wonder who got murdered with it?

That's a real possibility, those were never cheap enough for someone to just toss because they didn't like it.
A trapper or squirrel hunter probably put it down in the fall leaves and couldn't find it.

Kharn
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 8:25:46 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PR361:
OP, I have never used This Product but several reliable, trusted friends swear it is nothing short of magic on rust.

Also, to the pitting, once the gun is pitted to that extent, it's a shooter, and I like my guns to be decent looking, so I'm not afraid to do some serious sanding and bluing tpo bring them back.

You would be surprised how many pits you can file or sand out without changing the essential dimensions of the gun, and rust bluing is a very user friendly, non-toxic way for the home enthusiast to restore a nice black finish to steel guns.

Just one example of a few I've restored.

Fire damaged 94


https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/195613/2013-01-08-22-158834.JPG

Lots of sandpaper

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/195613/DSC01232-158837.JPG

Rust blued and shootable. Original Receiver, hammer, trigger, cartridge tube, rear sight, barrel bands, follower were used,

barrel, bolt, blocking bolt , cartridge lifter, screws and springs were replaced.

In to see the restoration.

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/195613/photo--16--158838.JPG
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That's beautiful! Great work!
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 8:36:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/5/2017 9:02:19 AM EST by Osprey61]
It wouldn't be a popular choice with the folks that want you to do a project restoration, or see the gun in it's current state patina, but after seeing Nostrama's pistol I'd have to agree with Parshooter.

Unless you have some serious skills, OP, I'd establish a solid provenance to establish ownership (did someone say "found" guns in Florida get crushed? ), and then contact Turnbull to see how much they'd want to do a professional restoration.

From what I've read it would be somewhat expensive, but you'd have an heirloom quality pistol with a fascinating backstory...

Edit: Thought about it some more, OP. There are almost half a million ArfCommers, and this thread has been viewed 22,000 times already. You might point that out to Doug (Turnbull), that kind of exposure in the gun world isn't cheap and he might work you a deal. I'm guessing a follow-along thread would be very heavily subscribed.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 8:40:14 AM EST
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Originally Posted By RDak:
You might want to let the OP know where he can find parts.
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I've never needed parts.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:06:23 AM EST
OST
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:08:23 AM EST
Sorry to ruin the fun, but I would not put too much work into it without first having a cop buddy run it to see if it's stolen or reported missing. Title still belongs to the holder of title and the greater the value of an object, the greater the duty the finder has to locate and return said object to the title holder.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:09:54 AM EST
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Originally Posted By 4v50:
Sorry to ruin the fun, but I would not put too much work into it without first having a cop buddy run it to see if it's stolen or reported missing. Title still belongs to the holder of title and the greater the value of an object, the greater the duty the finder has to locate and return said object to the title holder.
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No, you're not.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:19:54 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 4v50:
Sorry to ruin the fun, but I would not put too much work into it without first having a cop buddy run it to see if it's stolen or reported missing. Title still belongs to the holder of title and the greater the value of an object, the greater the duty the finder has to locate and return said object to the title holder.
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That only works if the gun is registered.  Not all states have registries.  And if you're about to say the 4473 is a backdoor registry, that's also incorrect.

So how would "title" be established, other than by a NCIC/NLETS check?
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:31:49 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 4v50:
Sorry to ruin the fun, but I would not put too much work into it without first having a cop buddy run it to see if it's stolen or reported missing. Title still belongs to the holder of title and the greater the value of an object, the greater the duty the finder has to locate and return said object to the title holder.
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Let's me guess,you're gonna have a copy buddy find out that it was "stolen" on Monday.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:34:04 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/5/2017 9:34:54 AM EST by John_McClane]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cssalabama:

Looks like the slide safety is engaged.
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Originally Posted By cssalabama:
Originally Posted By Jormungandr:
Checked on it after a few hours, looks good so far. Took most of the surface rust off. Still won't open. Gonna let it sit over night.

Looks like the slide safety is engaged.
This. I could be mistooken, but that lever on the left side of the gun (the safety) has that tab that extends into the notch in the slide. Until that safety lever is brought down, you ain't movin' that slide for love nor money. Again, JMHO, I could be mistooken, but that's what it looks like to me.

Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:35:50 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JohnnyCarcinogen:

Let's me guess,you're gonna have a copy buddy find out that it was "stolen" on Monday.
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Originally Posted By JohnnyCarcinogen:
Originally Posted By 4v50:
Sorry to ruin the fun, but I would not put too much work into it without first having a cop buddy run it to see if it's stolen or reported missing. Title still belongs to the holder of title and the greater the value of an object, the greater the duty the finder has to locate and return said object to the title holder.

Let's me guess,you're gonna have a copy buddy find out that it was "stolen" on Monday.
IN!!!!
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:36:31 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 4v50:
Sorry to ruin the fun, but I would not put too much work into it without first having a cop buddy run it to see if it's stolen or reported missing. Title still belongs to the holder of title and the greater the value of an object, the greater the duty the finder has to locate and return said object to the title holder.
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I thought he already checked it and it was clean?
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:37:54 AM EST
Guys.. Some of you with the restoration nonsense..? It will never have any real collector value. Way to much pitting everywhere. Hundreds if not thousands of better examples floating around.
Restoring it into reliable shooting condation will most likely cost more than finding a currently working beater.

Interesting project.. Sure. Something to do because you have the time and enjoy that kind of thing.. Sure.
Restoration for value.. NO.

Worked on several firearms like this. OP. You are on the right path. Soak it. Rap on it with a phenolic hammer. (The vibration will loosen some of the rust internally) Soak it some more. Rap on it some more. Remove anything that will remove. a very good chance (depending) that you will have some distructive dissembley.
Don't waste time being kind.. Get it apart and just wire wheel everything to see what you have left and the condation. Then you can evaluate what you have. Good chance the chamber has to much pitting and is done.

Enjoy it for what it is. Good luck.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:41:10 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Number1gun:
Guys.. Some of you with the restoration nonsense..? It will never have any real collector value. Way to much pitting everywhere. Hundreds if not thousands of better examples floating around.
Restoring it into reliable shooting condation will most likely cost more than finding a currently working beater.

Interesting project.. Sure. Something to do because you have the time and enjoy that kind of thing.. Sure.
Restoration for value.. NO.

Worked on several firearms like this. OP. You are on the right path. Soak it. Rap on it with a phenolic hammer. (The vibration will loosen some of the rust internally) Soak it some more. Rap on it some more. Remove anything that will remove. a very good chance (depending) that you will have some distructive dissembley.
Don't waste time being kind.. Get it apart and just wire wheel everything to see what you have left and the condation. Then you can evaluate what you have. Good chance the chamber has to much pitting and is done.

Enjoy it for what it is. Good luck.
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Do you know of any decent places he could buy parts...........the best one I could find was Jack First...............there are others but that company is pretty good.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:54:56 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RDak:
Do you know of any decent places he could buy parts...........the best one I could find was Jack First...............there are others but that company is pretty good.
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No.
If it were me. I would wait and see how ugly the dissembley gets and make a decision if it is realy worth the effort knowing the expense and reality of the compleated gun. You have to realy enjoy the project and challange aspect of something like this.
If I was committed to finding parts...? Internet first. Then. Every older gun shop I could find within 100 miles would get a visit. You would be supprised at the number of shops that have guns in parts in boxes collecting dust and no time to screw with the Internet. You have to walk in and ask.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 9:56:35 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Number1gun:


No.
If it were me. I would wait and see how ugly the dissembley gets and make a decision if it is realy worth the effort knowing the expense and reality of the compleated gun. You have to realy enjoy the project and challange aspect of something like this.
If I was committed to finding parts...? Internet first. Then. Every older gun shop I could find within 100 miles would get a visit. You would be supprised at the number of shops that have guns in parts in boxes collecting dust and no time to screw with the Internet. You have to walk in and ask.
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Makes sense.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:00:24 AM EST
 Electrolysis works great. We did the hood of a 69 Camaro this way. Took lots of anodes and a shit load of amperage,  came out great. 
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:17:38 AM EST
Going down to check on it again in a few minutes.

Yes I know the safety was engaged in those pics. The safety moves as it should and I put it on when washing it off just in case there is something in the chamber.

Gonna soak it in some kind of penetrating oil today and whack it with a rubber mallet.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:18:17 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Number1gun:
Guys.. Some of you with the restoration nonsense..? It will never have any real collector value. Way to much pitting everywhere. Hundreds if not thousands of better examples floating around.
Restoring it into reliable shooting condation will most likely cost more than finding a currently working beater.

Interesting project.. Sure. Something to do because you have the time and enjoy that kind of thing.. Sure.
Restoration for value.. NO.

Worked on several firearms like this. OP. You are on the right path. Soak it. Rap on it with a phenolic hammer. (The vibration will loosen some of the rust internally) Soak it some more. Rap on it some more. Remove anything that will remove. a very good chance (depending) that you will have some distructive dissembley.
Don't waste time being kind.. Get it apart and just wire wheel everything to see what you have left and the condation. Then you can evaluate what you have. Good chance the chamber has to much pitting and is done.

Enjoy it for what it is. Good luck.
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Agree with you on the economics of the thing, if all you're worried about is collector value.

The "heirloom quality" part is in the restorer's art. At least from Turnbull, you end up with a piece that's as nice/nicer than anything that would have come from the factory, and a pistol you'd be proud to pass down to your children. If they can't restore to that level because of the pitting, they won't take the project.

The "backstory" piece can't be bought. The pistol came from OP's land, and is part of its history. Anyone with cash can go buy a beautiful example and stick it in their safe. It's the difference between market value, and what you value personally.

How many folks in this thread have said, "I've never found anything that cool in my life."?
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:23:28 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lonerogue:
Was it used in a crime? Could be the evidence that puts someone away. Or make a cold case hot again.
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Considering the amount of rust on the exterior of the weapon it's evidentiary value would likely be zero.

Crown, bore, bolt face, chamber, extractor, ejector are probably too badly damaged to make any valid comparisons.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:30:58 AM EST
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Originally Posted By M1-Ed:
I only found dead bodies while walking in the woods.

Ed
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Doesn't count if you put them there.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:34:05 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By parshooter:

I agree that it's worth a proper restoration. The ultimate for going that route would be to send it off to Turnbull. Here's before and after pics of one of their projects. They could match the original Colt blue and make it look damn near factory-fresh.

http://www.turnbullmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/crispy-saa-before-replace.jpg

http://www.turnbullmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/crispy-saa-after-replace.jpg
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That's an impressive restoration
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:34:26 AM EST
Sweet find, good luck.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:35:44 AM EST
One thing's for sure: You won't have to "etch" the surface if you decide to paint it.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:36:15 AM EST
This is awesome. Cool find OP.

In for the results of the restoration or OP going to jail for possession of a stolen firearm
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:48:47 AM EST
More time and effort than it's worth in my opinion.

I was given a dozen house-fire guns many years ago.

They went through a major fire... then sat a few weeks in the water-soaked rubble.

I was only able to save a 10/22 out of the bunch.

The Browning lever gun and Rem 870 were both rusted solid... others (can't recall) were unrecognizable.

I put a ton of effort into the 10/22. Only original part was the receiver. Sold it at a gun show at a loss.

The others were cut up with a chop saw and tossed in the garbage.

The time, effort and money required to save them just didn't justify it.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:49:34 AM EST
Nice find. Seems you are on the right track. Good luck!
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 10:54:18 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Fig:
Turn it in to the police. Might be reported lost or stolen. Theft of lost or mislaid property.

Just saying.
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Yeah, I'd go with this. Never know if it could be associated with a crime etc. When I was in my early twenties, my dad found a 1911 in the woods while fishing. He was giddy about his luck in that "my new toy" way. I'm like, dad, for all you know, that could be a murder weapon someone ditched (the stream he was on was near a major freeway). He turned it in but never heard anything after the fact.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:12:43 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By parshooter:

I agree that it's worth a proper restoration. The ultimate for going that route would be to send it off to Turnbull. Here's before and after pics of one of their projects. They could match the original Colt blue and make it look damn near factory-fresh.

http://www.turnbullmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/crispy-saa-before-replace.jpg

http://www.turnbullmfg.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/crispy-saa-after-replace.jpg
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That's amazing
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:15:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/5/2017 11:22:03 AM EST by 4v50]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Seven-Shooter:
That only works if the gun is registered.  Not all states have registries.  And if you're about to say the 4473 is a backdoor registry, that's also incorrect.

So how would "title" be established, other than by a NCIC/NLETS check?
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Not quite to registry thing.

Title is a legal concept. For example if you rent a car and you have possession, but the title to the car which remains with the rental agency. In the case of firearms, it is the person who lawfully bought, inherited, gifted, swapped it. 4473 may or may not be relevant. That an individual should lose possesion doesn't not dispossess him of title to the property.

ETA: that childhood saying, "Finder's keeper, loser's weeper" is not the law.

To establish title, a good faith effort must be made by the finder to locate the title holder. In this case, it may be delivering it to law enforcement and then claiming it after a period of time. Every agency is different and some agencies like SFPD refuses (those bastages) to return sh*t. There is a computerized stolen firearm system it can check with. However, if the agency is unsuccessful in locating the title holder and insteads returns it to the finder, the finder should have both possession and now title.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:18:09 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Jormungandr:
Yes I know the safety was engaged in those pics. The safety moves as it should and I put it on when washing it off just in case there is something in the chamber.
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Figured you would have noticed that, just thot I'd mention it. Good luck!
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:22:04 AM EST
Looking forward to the results! Love projects like this.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:25:55 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
More time and effort than it's worth in my opinion.

I was given a dozen house-fire guns many years ago.

They went through a major fire... then sat a few weeks in the water-soaked rubble.

I was only able to save a 10/22 out of the bunch.

The Browning lever gun and Rem 870 were both rusted solid... others (can't recall) were unrecognizable.

I put a ton of effort into the 10/22. Only original part was the receiver. Sold it at a gun show at a loss.

The others were cut up with a chop saw and tossed in the garbage.

The time, effort and money required to save them just didn't justify it.
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In dollars and cents? You are absolutely correct. But this is the same thing I'd do: try to get her running again. It'll prolly never be worth what you put into it, but I just have a love of finding classic, nice old guns (not potmetal crap ) and getting them back on their feet again. Well done, OP.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:31:22 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Number1gun:
Guys.. Some of you with the restoration nonsense..? It will never have any real collector value. Way to much pitting everywhere. Hundreds if not thousands of better examples floating around....
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The journey is sometimes more important than the destination.  I've built or restored several firearms, including a few that were designed by John Moses Browning.  Those I have found to be particularly interesting, retracing his sometimes creative use of tooling and the way he visualized mechanisms.

My dad spent quite a bit of time making wood carvings.  Some of his creations were practical, such as several cutting boards he made from found wood.  Most were just somewhat primitive art pieces (he had some raw talent and no formal training.)  He never made anything worth enough to recoup the time he put into it, but he loved doing it and then giving his creations away.

If I ever find a firearm the way the OP did, I would be doing pretty much what he is doing.  It exercises the intellect and can give the satisfaction of creating something that works.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:35:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/5/2017 11:37:23 AM EST by Jormungandr]
well here it is after the overnight bath









still cant get it opened up, the rear seems rusted shut still.

its currently soaking in penetrating oil.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:41:35 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:42:20 AM EST
You have any Kroil? That's the very best penetrating oil.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:43:15 AM EST
Kroil.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:43:30 AM EST
unfortunately no, im using some home brewed mixture right now lol.

if it doesnt work ill get some kroil.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:48:02 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JK_Pyre:
Yeah, I'd go with this. Never know if it could be associated with a crime etc. When I was in my early twenties, my dad found a 1911 in the woods while fishing. He was giddy about his luck in that "my new toy" way. I'm like, dad, for all you know, that could be a murder weapon someone ditched (the stream he was on was near a major freeway). He turned it in but never heard anything after the fact.
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Originally Posted By JK_Pyre:
Originally Posted By Fig:
Turn it in to the police. Might be reported lost or stolen. Theft of lost or mislaid property.

Just saying.
Yeah, I'd go with this. Never know if it could be associated with a crime etc. When I was in my early twenties, my dad found a 1911 in the woods while fishing. He was giddy about his luck in that "my new toy" way. I'm like, dad, for all you know, that could be a murder weapon someone ditched (the stream he was on was near a major freeway). He turned it in but never heard anything after the fact.



When I read posts like this, I feel glad that I'm morally flexible.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:48:29 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By California_Kid:

The journey is sometimes more important than the destination.  I've built or restored several firearms, including a few that were designed by John Moses Browning.  Those I have found to be particularly interesting, retracing his sometimes creative use of tooling and the way he visualized mechanisms.

My dad spent quite a bit of time making wood carvings.  Some of his creations were practical, such as several cutting boards he made from found wood.  Most were just somewhat primitive art pieces (he had some raw talent and no formal training.)  He never made anything worth enough to recoup the time he put into it, but he loved doing it and then giving his creations away.

If I ever find a firearm the way the OP did, I would be doing pretty much what he is doing.  It exercises the intellect and can give the satisfaction of creating something that works.
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Originally Posted By California_Kid:
Originally Posted By Number1gun:
Guys.. Some of you with the restoration nonsense..? It will never have any real collector value. Way to much pitting everywhere. Hundreds if not thousands of better examples floating around....

The journey is sometimes more important than the destination.  I've built or restored several firearms, including a few that were designed by John Moses Browning.  Those I have found to be particularly interesting, retracing his sometimes creative use of tooling and the way he visualized mechanisms.

My dad spent quite a bit of time making wood carvings.  Some of his creations were practical, such as several cutting boards he made from found wood.  Most were just somewhat primitive art pieces (he had some raw talent and no formal training.)  He never made anything worth enough to recoup the time he put into it, but he loved doing it and then giving his creations away.

If I ever find a firearm the way the OP did, I would be doing pretty much what he is doing.  It exercises the intellect and can give the satisfaction of creating something that works.


Exactly! Who the hell cares about collector value for something like this. The only value that matters is the value to the person that has it. I have a 1923 Ford Model TT that is more rust and rot than anything and it will never be "worth" what it will cost to restore. Don't care. It is worth it to me
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:49:45 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Jormungandr:
still cant get it opened up, the rear seems rusted shut still.

its currently soaking in penetrating oil.
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Put a rod down the barrel, make sure the chamber is clear, then start tapping that slide back. It will move.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:51:01 AM EST
That gun will shoot again.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:52:32 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Jormungandr:
well here it is after the overnight bath

http://i.imgur.com/ESLqvzE.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/9PEgJTj.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/rER4yCD.jpg



still cant get it opened up, the rear seems rusted shut still.

its currently soaking in penetrating oil.
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Do you have a plastic hammer? I would give it a few whacks on every flat surface, to jar the pieces loose, then try it. When I'm working on old rusted bolts, I knock the shit outta them before trying to rotate. Obviously this is a more delicate operation, hence the plastic hammer, but principle is the same.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:52:53 AM EST
I'd be tempted to drop a brass rod down the bore and tap on that.  Plus you'd find out for sure whether there's anything in the chamber.
Link Posted: 3/5/2017 11:54:00 AM EST
Thread of the year if she winds up as a full resto!
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