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Posted: 7/22/2008 5:30:05 PM EST
Who has used the green slime tire fix stuff

Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:32:47 PM EST
I refuse to use anything other than a plug or inside patch on a tire repair. The canned repair stuff makes a tire a mofo to balance. Some gels never really dry out & remain as a sludge.

My .o2
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:33:05 PM EST
Go On ATV's. I had good luck with it..
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:33:32 PM EST
what is the application?
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:34:30 PM EST
On offroad or dirtbike tires, Slime is the shiznit - really works.

On car tires, I'll repair but not with the goo - makes a mess inside the wheel.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:35:34 PM EST
Great for lawn and garden equipment, but blows for cars and trucks.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:40:18 PM EST
yep used it on my mountain bike but wouldn't use it in my truck
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:41:33 PM EST
good for lawn equipment and ATV's. I wouldnt use it on a car unless it was an emergency.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:41:49 PM EST
I used it to repair a tire on my car (nail hole in the tread) and then proceeded to get another 20,000 miles of service out of that tire.

It is GTG as long as it is not a sidewall puncture.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:43:22 PM EST
It's good for a quick fix so you can get it to a repair shop. Not a permanent solution and also makes a nasty mess.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:45:52 PM EST
Use it on my cars and trucks.

As long as you do not have low tire pressure sensors in them it is never a problem and has "fixed" some flats for me.

If you have the sensors do not use it it will bang on them as the tire turns and cause vibration, not to mention ruin the sensors .
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 5:51:09 PM EST
the green slime is a blessing when trapping tons of miles on a 4 wheeler.

I assume it would work just as well in a car or truck tire.

Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:00:06 PM EST
Slime is great in a ATV, off roader, or mountain bike tire. I'd imagine that putting it in a regular car tire would cause a severe vibration as the goop gets slung around the inside at speed.

Semper Fi
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:00:39 PM EST
creates a hell of amess in your car tire. depending on the product, it may piss off your tire guy and or corrode your wheel
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:08:08 PM EST
I use it in my mountain bike.

I normally wouldn't recommend using it in a car or truck except in an emergency.

I have used it in my F-150 one time when I was deep off road and picked up a small tire puncture from a sharp rock. It worked but really made a mess of my wheel both inside and out. I had no choice as the tire would have bled out before I could make it back to a main road.

I carry green slime, a plug kit and an old fashioned bicycle tire pump in my truck at all times.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:09:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 6:09:47 PM EST by lew]
Tried the canned shit a week ago in Cimarron, New Mexico. Simply put, it didn't work. Had to ride the donut to Raton and get the tire properly patched.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:11:20 PM EST
i have fixed flats on 2 different riding mower tires with slime. good stuff.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:38:03 PM EST
A must for off road rec vehicles. A no go for street cars (simple plug kit and 12v pump).
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:39:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By swingset:
On offroad or dirtbike tires, Slime is the shiznit - really works.

On car tires, I'll repair but not with the goo - makes a mess inside the wheel.


+1

my buddy that used to owrk at a tire shop HATES the shit slime and fix-a-flat
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:40:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By choad33:
Who has used the green slime tire fix stuff



I would not use that in street tires. Off road ok, but not on the highway.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 6:40:59 PM EST
Use a $1 sticky tire plug and call it good.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 7:09:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2008 7:13:42 PM EST by Skibane]

Originally Posted By omega62:
I used it to repair a tire on my car (nail hole in the tread) and then proceeded to get another 20,000 miles of service horribly unbalanced abuse out of that tire.


Fixed.

After you stop driving for a while, where do you think that puddle of goo settles (and eventually hardens)? You can't keep driving forever - Eventually, it'll puddle on one side of the tire when you park the vehicle overnight.

Do yourself a favor - Get a $5 tire plugging kit (the kind that has a plug insertion tool, a hole reamer and half a dozen plugs) along with a $4 can of tire cement. Pull the nail out of the tire, ream the hole, put a plug on end of the insertion tool before dipping it in the can of cement, and then insert the wet plug into the hole just far enough to have just a little bit of plug sticking out. Trim the excess plug with a razor blade, air the tire up to recommended pressure, and you're done. It's easy, cheap, quick, and you don't need to add 5 pounds of wheel balancing weights afterwards.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 7:45:24 PM EST
only if you REALLY want to piss off the guy changing your tires.
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 7:52:08 PM EST
DIY plugs are better, only problem I have had with them was a plug that leaked after 3+ yrs which was about the time the tire was worn down anyway
Link Posted: 7/22/2008 7:52:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By Skibane:

Originally Posted By omega62:
I used it to repair a tire on my car (nail hole in the tread) and then proceeded to get another 20,000 miles of service horribly unbalanced abuse out of that tire.


Fixed.

After you stop driving for a while, where do you think that puddle of goo settles (and eventually hardens)? You can't keep driving forever - Eventually, it'll puddle on one side of the tire when you park the vehicle overnight.

Do yourself a favor - Get a $5 tire plugging kit (the kind that has a plug insertion tool, a hole reamer and half a dozen plugs) along with a $4 can of tire cement. Pull the nail out of the tire, ream the hole, put a plug on end of the insertion tool before dipping it in the can of cement, and then insert the wet plug into the hole just far enough to have just a little bit of plug sticking out. Trim the excess plug with a razor blade, air the tire up to recommended pressure, and you're done. It's easy, cheap, quick, and you don't need to add 5 pounds of wheel balancing weights afterwards.


About the only thing I can think of to say in reply to this is what Nigel said to Rob Reiner in the SPINAL TAP movie when Reiner was asking him about his amplifiers:

"These go to eleven!"

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