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Posted: 9/9/2010 9:44:30 AM EDT
OK with the Ethanol that's in gasoline. I am hearing that the alcohol is evaporating and will mess your carburetor in small engines, with today's gas blends.

My question is this. Without buying those little cans of pre mixed gas, is there any stabilizers that have recently came onto the market to solve this issue?

I have two Husqvarna's and one Stihl and I don't want to have to replace the carbs on these fine saws.

thanks for any help Bob W.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 10:09:23 AM EDT
tagged for interest.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 10:11:00 AM EDT
I use gas from a marina in mine.

I also found a distributor that sells unblended fuel.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 10:18:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 10:33:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/9/2010 10:34:38 AM EDT by Skibane]
Originally Posted By kabob:
OK with the Ethanol that's in gasoline. I am hearing that the alcohol is evaporating and will mess your carburetor in small engines, with today's gas blends.


The Ethanol absorbs water. After sitting in your tank for a while, the water can separate and settle in clumps. Clumps of water don't burn very well.

Without buying those little cans of pre mixed gas, is there any stabilizers that have recently came onto the market to solve this issue?


Sta-Bil has a "Marine Formula" for gasoline that contains ethanol - I've seen it for sale at Pep Boys, right next to their regular formula.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 10:36:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By INI:
http://mystarbrite.com/startron/


we sold the hell out of this at the shop i last worked at. Supposed to be an enzyme treatment to help eat the water out of the ethanol. Nobody ever complained about it and I run it in my stuff. Winter will tell how well it works.

And the ethanol doesnt evaporate, its sucks moisture out of the air and once it sucks up all it can it separates and goes to the bottom of the tank, making it a nice watery mess.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 10:38:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By rangermonroe:
I use gas from a marina in mine.

I also found a distributor that sells unblended fuel.


Do tell

I'm guessing the marina is out by your house, or is it here in town?
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 12:15:25 PM EDT
You will prolly laugh at me... but, I use race fuel in my small engines. Specifically Unocal C10 that I buy in 55 gallon drums for my Z-28.
You can get a 5 gallon can for 50 bucks which is way more than I would use in a year.
I don't use much mixed fuel.. my weedeater and chainsaw are all that require it so it's not a huge expense. I might use 3 gallons all year....
I find that starting them is much easier than using the treated gasahol... and they also seem to run much cooler.
Not to mention it won't screw with the rubber gaskets, diaphrams or O-rings.... I got really tired of rebuilding carbs every spring. I needed fuel one morning, looked at the drum and thought why not...

just my 2 cents...
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 12:21:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By kabob:
OK with the Ethanol that's in gasoline. I am hearing that the alcohol is evaporating and will mess your carburetor in small engines, with today's gas blends.

My question is this. Without buying those little cans of pre mixed gas, is there any stabilizers that have recently came onto the market to solve this issue?

I have two Husqvarna's and one Stihl and I don't want to have to replace the carbs on these fine saws.

thanks for any help Bob W.


There are 2 issues you are asking about.

1) Stopping fuel decay
2) Stopping Ethanol from attacking certain types of plastic/rubber.

Yes, there are products that work better with ethanol blends to address #1.

No, there is pretty much nothing you can do to stop Ethanol from attacking vulnerable components. That's what it does. It's like asking oxygen not to rust bare steel.

If you don't use the saw often, those 'little cans of premix' are the best option.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 12:26:52 PM EDT
I remember when my dad had an old '64 Evinrude, we'd disconnect the fuel line and let the carb run out of gas each time we were about to pull it out of the water. This kept gas from eating away at the carb. Carb didn't give any problems for over 30 years.

Also, keeping the tank topped off will prevent humid air from going in and out the tank with temp. changes, which is what causes the water to form.
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