Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/30/2005 1:46:46 PM EDT
This guy almost got me.
Thank God they have that rattle.



Link Posted: 7/30/2005 1:48:10 PM EDT
did you kill it?
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 1:52:48 PM EDT
What? you rather have that damn NJ Turnpike or the snake?

I pick snake hands down.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 1:53:55 PM EDT
I dunno where you lived in NJ but up in the Ramapo Mountains at least 4 Rattlesnakes visited me.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 1:55:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
What? you rather have that damn NJ Turnpike or the snake?

I pick snake hands down.



You fucking A tweety I'd rather have the snake, at least you know where the snakes intentions lay and he's a 1000 times more honest than the most honest politician in jersey.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 1:56:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red_Beard:
did you kill it?



No I'm waiting for a two-fer so I can make a pair of boots LOL
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 1:59:48 PM EDT
Lautenberg relaxed
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:01:22 PM EDT
I didn't think you guys got rattlers that far north.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:03:43 PM EDT
DRAW DOWN ON IT!
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:04:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:
I didn't think you guys got rattlers that far north.



I think they're around the entire country.


We have them in north dakota. My brother and I found one while collecting firewood out camping.

Beat it to death with some logs. We cut it open after it was dead and found a couple of partially digested mice inside, which was pretty cool.

damn snakes!

Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:06:31 PM EDT
That is a damn big rattler
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:17:09 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:20:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bama-Shooter:
I didn't think you guys got rattlers that far north.



They're all over. Even have them in Michigan.




Michigan rattler kills 85-pound dog at Stanton home

By Ryon List - Daily News staff writer
STANTON -- When Janis Hoople learned that her 85-pound, black Labrador retriever had been killed by a rattlesnake bite in her backyard last week, she said she wasn't aware that type of venomous snake even existed in Stanton.

When an official with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) told her that the eastern massasauga rattlesnake, more commonly known as the Michigan rattler, was protected by the state, Hoople said she felt frustrated.

"They suggested we move it (the snake)," Hoople said of the DNR. "But where do we move it to?"

After a veterinarian in Grand Rapids told Hoople that her 5-year-old dog, Libby, had died as the result of a snakebite, Hoople called the DNR for questions about the massasauga and how to get rid of it. She was told it is against the law to kill the massasauga because it is protected by a DNR order. She also was told the DNR will not remove the snake from an area. Property owners are responsible for removal of the snake or having it removed.

Hoople lives in the country outside Stanton on Klees Road.

Lori Sargent, a wildlife biologist with the DNR, said larger dogs usually do not die from the massasauga's bite unless they suffer from complications from the rattlesnake's venom when bitten in the face or neck. Hoople said Libby was bitten on her front right shoulder last Wednesday and died a week ago today.

"It happens to smaller animals, but usually not larger animals," Sargent said.

She said animal deaths -- especially in larger animals -- from the massasauga bite are uncommon. Sargent also said records indicate the massasauga has not been responsible for a human death in Michigan, though people reportedly died after being bitten 40 years ago in Canada when they were not treated in a timely manner.

"They like to stay under cover and they're really a nonaggressive snake. They're not nearly as aggressive or poisonous as the western rattlesnakes," Sargent said. "If you leave them alone, they'll leave you alone. But I personally would not want one in my backyard either."

The massasauga is the only venomous snake in Michigan. It can be found throughout the Lower Peninsula, but not in the Upper Peninsula.

Yu Man Lee, a zoologist with the Michigan Natural Features Inventory, part of the Michigan State University Extension office, said the snake's first instinct when approached is to hide.

"It tends to be pretty shy. Generally it tries to remain undetected," she said. "But it's harder for pets to avoid them because they like to poke around with their noses."

Lee said only a couple of people are bitten by the snake each year in Michigan and the effects can be treated. She said the number of pets bitten is difficult to determine. Usually those cases are not reported.

Lee also said many times when the massasauga bites it does not release venom.

Still, Hoople said she is concerned about other pets and especially children who might run across the massasauga in her neighborhood.

"I just find it kind of frustrating that they (the DNR) don't have any ways to control it," Hoople said.

Michigan rattler safety


Keep your distance and use caution.


Do not pick it up.


Keep all pets away.


If bitten, call 911 or your medical care provider.


If a pet is bitten, take it to a veterinarian.


Report all massasauga sightings to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources at (517) 373-1263.

Eastern massasauga rattlesnake Michigan rattler

Michigan's only venomous snake, the eastern massasauga rattlesnake is a rare sight for most state residents. Historically they can be found in a variety of wetlands and nearby upland woods throughout the Lower Peninsula. An average length for an adult snake is 2 to 3 feet. Females give birth to 8 to 20 young during late summer.

During the late spring, the massasauga move from their winter hibernation sites, such as crayfish chimneys and other small mammal burrows in swamps and marshlands, to hunt on the drier upland sites -- likely in search of mice and voles, their favorite food.

The massasauga can be characterized as a shy, sluggish snake. Its thick body is colored with a pattern of dark brown, slightly rectangular patches set against a light gray to brown background. Occasionally this coloration can be so dark as to appear almost black. It is the only Michigan snake with segmented rattles on the end of its tail and elliptical -- cat-like -- vertical pupils in the eyes.

These rattlesnakes avoid confrontation with humans. They are not prone to strike, preferring to leave the area when threatened. Like any animal though, these snakes will protect themselves from anything they see as a potential predator. Their short fangs can easily puncture skin and they do possess a potent venom. The few bites that occur to humans often result from attempts to handle or kill the snakes. Any bite from a massasauga should receive prompt professional medical attention.

Massasaugas are found throughout the Lower Peninsula but not in the Upper Peninsula. They are becoming rare in many parts of their former range, throughout the Great Lakes area, due to wetland habitat loss and persecution by humans. They are listed as a "species of special concern" by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and are protected by state law.

When compared with other rattlesnakes found in the United States, the massasauga is the smallest and has the least toxic venom.

Source: State of Michigan

www.michigan.gov

Source: State of Michigan

www.michigan.gov

Staff writer Ryon List can be reached at rlist@staffordgroup.com or (616) 754-9303 ext. 3050.



www.thedailynews.cc/articles/2004/05/06/news/news01.txt
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:25:42 PM EDT
Just remember that it’s more afraid of you than you are of it!!
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:34:14 PM EDT
there's better gun laws than in Jersey, something you don't have to worry about!
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:37:49 PM EDT
Baked or fried, that's a fine meal.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:40:01 PM EDT
Damn dude!! You've been in Pa, what, not quite a year and you already found a rattler. I've been here for almost 20 years (out in the country the whole time) and have seen a total of 3 black snakes the whole time.

I'd kill the thing if it were me, I'd hate to have my dog get bitten by it.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:49:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SP1Grrl:


Instead of killing it, you ran and got the camera?



No I kept messing with him while my son ran and grabbed the camera while my wife was screaming "you're gonna get bit!"
And I was yelling back "I have life insurance so STFU before I do get bit listening to you LOL"
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:53:11 PM EDT
How big was it? Looks to be about a foot or so in the second pic...
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 2:56:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hydguy:
How big was it? Looks to be about a foot or so in the second pic...



I'd say 4 or 5 feet.
count the rattles on his tail and that should tell you something.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 3:11:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 3:21:52 PM EDT
That sure is a biggin alright!

They still don't compare to the Water Moccasins that I have seen down here though! Bad thing about them is... they will chase your ass!!!!!!
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 3:22:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jrzy:

Originally Posted By Hydguy:
How big was it? Looks to be about a foot or so in the second pic...



I'd say 4 or 5 feet.
count the rattles on his tail and that should tell you something.



He has shed 9 times. Still doesn't tell me how big he is.

You should have picked him up by the tail so we could see how he looks at full extension (but hey, I understand you would be embarresed)...
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 4:30:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hydguy:

Originally Posted By jrzy:

Originally Posted By Hydguy:
How big was it? Looks to be about a foot or so in the second pic...



I'd say 4 or 5 feet.
count the rattles on his tail and that should tell you something.



He has shed 9 times. Still doesn't tell me how big he is.

You should have picked him up by the tail so we could see how he looks at full extension (but hey, I understand you would be embarresed)...




Before you talk about someone being embarrassed you should learn how to spell it
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 4:32:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jrzy:

Originally Posted By Hydguy:

Originally Posted By jrzy:

Originally Posted By Hydguy:
How big was it? Looks to be about a foot or so in the second pic...



I'd say 4 or 5 feet.
count the rattles on his tail and that should tell you something.



He has shed 9 times. Still doesn't tell me how big he is.

You should have picked him up by the tail so we could see how he looks at full extension (but hey, I understand you would be embarresed)...




Before you talk about someone being embarrassed you should learn how to spell it



It's the net...I don't mins misspelling stuff!!!
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 4:33:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hydguy:

He has shed 9 times. Still doesn't tell me how big he is.



By the way check your math and counting skills.
He has 11 rattles and that means he shed 10 times and that does give an indication of size and age if you know anything about Rattlesnakes.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 4:48:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By P806:
Baked or fried, that's a fine meal.



+1000....beat me to it!
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 4:58:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jrzy:

Originally Posted By Hydguy:

He has shed 9 times. Still doesn't tell me how big he is.



By the way check your math and counting skills.
He has 11 rattles and that means he shed 10 times and that does give an indication of size and age if you know anything about Rattlesnakes.



In the top pic, it looks like 9 and a button. Could be that the fuzzy pic is throwing me off....
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 5:25:24 PM EDT
The Pinbarrons of NJ have plenty of rattle snakes. I guess you North Jersey guys never noticed.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 5:30:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By P806:
Baked or fried, that's a fine meal.



Fine meal and if you get enough of them they make nice boots too.

A snake is an easy meal.

Link Posted: 7/30/2005 5:41:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hydguy:

Originally Posted By jrzy:

Originally Posted By Hydguy:

He has shed 9 times. Still doesn't tell me how big he is.



By the way check your math and counting skills.
He has 11 rattles and that means he shed 10 times and that does give an indication of size and age if you know anything about Rattlesnakes.



In the top pic, it looks like 9 and a button. Could be that the fuzzy pic is throwing me off....



Nice trolling jerky
You know as well as all of us that the pic is clear as a bell.
That rattle is moving really fast, nice try though.
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 11:39:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GC456:
That sure is a biggin alright!

They still don't compare to the Water Moccasins that I have seen down here though! Bad thing about them is... they will chase your ass!!!!!!



Water moccasins dont compare to the taipans, tigers, etc around here
Link Posted: 7/30/2005 11:43:33 PM EDT
The first wild rattlesnake I saw was in Warren County, NJ
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 2:36:13 AM EDT
OK, THis is NJ, they said the rattler was endangered and brought some to the Batsto area to repopulate, OK, doe sthis make sense? we have no cobras either, how about other dangerous species.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 5:42:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/31/2005 5:45:18 AM EDT by jrzy]

Originally Posted By FiftyCalibre:

Originally Posted By GC456:
That sure is a biggin alright!

They still don't compare to the Water Moccasins that I have seen down here though! Bad thing about them is... they will chase your ass!!!!!!



Water moccasins dont compare to the taipans, tigers, etc around here



Yeah you guys down under have some pretty deadly snakes and spiders.

www.usyd.edu.au/anaes/venom/snakebite.html#small

www.termite.com/spiders/Funnel-Web-Spider.shtml



The mature male funnel-web spider will wander around during hot humid nights, looking for a mate.
Invariably after mating when he is totally exhausted the female bites him and sucks all the nourishment from his body leaving him an empty shell.



The funnel-web female spider is like some women huh LOL
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 6:07:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/31/2005 6:08:25 AM EDT by JohnnyMcEldoo]

Originally Posted By jrzy:

Originally Posted By Hydguy:
How big was it? Looks to be about a foot or so in the second pic...



I'd say 4 or 5 feet.
count the rattles on his tail and that should tell you something.




No frickin way man! Dat ting coulda really put you in a hurtin and whatnot. Youz needs to get out of dat area and get back to Joisy!



and whatnot
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 6:25:57 AM EDT
We get the western diamondbacks around here all the time. They are a bit smaller, but mean. I always kill them if I see one. One bit my dog once, but the dog lived.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 8:25:25 AM EDT
Welcome to PA. By the way, we have copperheads here too.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 8:30:13 AM EDT
Kill it, then fry it
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 2:41:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Taxman:
Kill it, then fry it



Batter
Top Top