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Posted: 4/28/2015 9:12:37 PM EDT
So has anyone?

I am curious about the dimensions. I hear it is small feeling all the way around.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:04:00 AM EDT
I sat on one at the dealer the other day. It is on the smaller size... but I thought it was about perfect. Looked real nice too...

If hadn't have just bought a new bike, I would have of considered the scrambler.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 8:19:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2015 8:32:56 AM EDT by frozenny]
Have not ridden the new scrambler Seating position looks good. But Ive seen a bunch of reviews mentioning the same thing: Shifting gears is often imprecise and vague, with numerous false shifts. And I've seen this comment consistent. Thats a deal breaker for me.


http://lanesplitter.jalopnik.com/first-ride-the-ducati-scrambler-is-an-amazingly-fun-bi-1669889005#

"The standard exhaust is surprisingly muffled, but drowns out the clatter of the twin, which sounds like a tattoo gun piped through a megaphone at lower speeds. Shifting is easy and quick, although there were a few odd drops into neutral that came out of nowhere. And the throttle is a bit snatchy, acting more like an on/off switch when dawdling around town. Some say it's part of the Scrambler's "character," I'm less convinced, and Ducati could and should be able to fix it with a few lines of code."


http://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/2015-ducati-scrambler-first-ride
'It took me all of six miles to find my first false neutral and, as with every other air-cooled Ducati I’ve ridden, the shift peg makes you give it a solid kick, rather than slight nudge (which makes shifting a little more difficult while riding standing up).'

http://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars/first-drives/news/a24497/the-2015-ducati-scrambler-is-why-we-ride/
On the way out of Idyllwild I find my first quibble. Leaning into a corner and downshifting from sixth to fifth, I find a false neutral where I'd hoped to find a little engine braking.

I figure magazines make money on advertising. Most of them tend to be "optimistic", not wanting to trash a potential advertiser's product for fear of loosing advertising sales. So, when I see the same negative comment posted repeatedly in numerous sources, I figure its a real issue.

I can move foot pegs, use handle bar risers, buy new seats and otherwise tweak ergonomics on a bike. But there isn't a lot I can do about an unreliable gear box.


Link Posted: 4/29/2015 11:06:20 AM EDT
I have sat on one, the ergos feel pretty good, it's skinny, should make a great first or second bike.

I have ridden several models with the same engine, it's by no means a powerhouse, but is plenty for real world use.

What some are saying about the trans might be somewhat true.
It is something I have experienced with Ducati's (currently own 3,have owned 5 total) and it's not really that uncommon. Ducati transmissions don't like to be pussyfooted, especially if the trans is not under engine load. If you give it a light push on the gear selector (usually on the downshift, higher in the gear range) you will likely get a false neutral.
This is usually due to rider error or lack of familiarity with the bike, rather than a mechanical issue.
It does not qualify the trans as "unreliable".

Once you realize you cant be vague about your shifting on a Duc the "problem" seems to miraculously fix itself, which is something you should realize asap because few things will spike your suckometer the way a downshift from 5th to N while entering a corner will.

I think they are pretty cool bikes and kudos to Ducati for making them.
My wife wants one in the worst way, but will probably have to wait till next summer. She currently rides an S2R 800, and she liked sitting on the Scrambler better than her current ride.
If she gets one, She will have to share!!!

Link Posted: 4/29/2015 11:31:55 AM EDT
I sat on one, I'd really like to test ride one. All the comments on hard shifting confuse me, I've owned a variety of bikes (Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki) and the shifting has always been easy. In fact I broke a shift peg off of a bike with a few overzealous shifts...

Link Posted: 4/29/2015 1:08:52 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gyrene84:
I sat on one, I'd really like to test ride one. All the comments on hard shifting confuse me, I've owned a variety of bikes (Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki) and the shifting has always been easy. In fact I broke a shift peg off of a bike with a few overzealous shifts...

View Quote

I tried to clarify the conditions i have experienced, but it is really hard to put into words

They do not suffer from "hard" shifting, it doesn't take any more effort to shift than any other bike, and it never seems to happen on the up shift.
If it happens it's going to be on a down shift from 6-5 or 5-4. I don't know why some Duc's do this, but I have experienced it.
The only times I have experienced this (2 times on 2 different bikes) I can definitely say my shifting technique/force applied/distance lever was pressed was absolutely a factor.
It was not a flaw with the bike, I did it wrong

You will find the folks complaining about this "problem" usualy have very few miles on said bike. You will also hear them complain about the "twitchy" throttle, again with very few miles in that particular saddle.
After a couple of hundred miles, these (and other) problems seem to disappear.

No bike is perfect, and anyone reviewing a bike for an article must find something about the bike they don't like (there is a WHOLE lotta Ducati hate out there), so take all reviews with a grain of salt.

No way in hell would I let internet motoninjas deter me from a test ride.
Go ride one and see if YOU have a problem, If you really did break a shift peg from overzealous shifting, i predict you will never experience this phenomena

Just like guns,
Just cause somebody else can't hit shit with a 1911 doesn't necessarily mean the gun is at fault.

Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:45:58 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By azarak512:

/snip
Go ride one and see if YOU have a problem, If you really did break a shift peg from overzealous shifting, i predict you will never experience this phenomena

/snip

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By azarak512:
Originally Posted By Gyrene84:
I sat on one, I'd really like to test ride one. All the comments on hard shifting confuse me, I've owned a variety of bikes (Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki) and the shifting has always been easy. In fact I broke a shift peg off of a bike with a few overzealous shifts...


/snip
Go ride one and see if YOU have a problem, If you really did break a shift peg from overzealous shifting, i predict you will never experience this phenomena

/snip



Yep, the rubber coated aluminum knurl snapped right off, I replaced it with a folding forged steel lever. I plan on test riding one in the next few weeks, if the OP beats me to it please share your results.
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 10:50:51 PM EDT
Azarak, is that your wife or a stock photo? If that is your wife how tall is she?
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 11:27:31 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Canoeguy:
Azarak, is that your wife or a stock photo? If that is your wife how tall is she?
View Quote

Yup, that's the sammich maker.
She is about 5'6" or so. Probably 28" inseam.

I sat on the same bike, the seat is def low, and the grips are low, but the bike did not feel "small"
The stock bars have a ton of sweep (5" maybe) which means the front of the bike is farther away than it feels.
So there is room to grow if if feels too compact.

I'm 5'11"- 32" inseam, I would probably put a little taller/more forward bar on it if I were to own one, but, sitting on it I could easily buzz that bike all over town in stock form.
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 5:19:30 AM EDT
I honestly can't see what makes that a "scrambler" and it's ugly.
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 2:09:44 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dipper:
I honestly can't see what makes that a "scrambler" and it's ugly.
View Quote



If you look at the original Ducati scrambler you will see this bike stayed true to form. Back then there were no mondo dirt bikes in the way we know them today and all it took to go off road was a little clearance and some balls.

I love watching the old military footage of them riding the hardtail Harleys off road. Crazy.
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 2:32:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/30/2015 2:48:30 PM EDT by Balista]
Others to consider

BWM Nine T



Yahama Bolt



Link Posted: 4/30/2015 2:47:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 5:52:42 PM EDT
Add made in Thailand instead of Italy to the negatives.
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 8:11:31 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By destaccado:
Add made in Thailand instead of Italy to the negatives.
View Quote

Italian unions gotta have more $$ for fewer hours somehow.

Engines and frames are still made at home in Italy, assembly for non euro market will be in Thailand.
Eupopean market bikes still come from Italy.

This is hardly news or uncommon, its also how they can hit their U.S. price point of $8500.
Won't matter to those who want to hate, but it is a Ducati factory that Ducati built in Thailand, not a third party mfg, so there is that.
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 8:44:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/30/2015 8:44:49 PM EDT by flyhack72]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Balista:
http://i.imgur.com/AkbsvBK.png
View Quote



I'm sorry. I like the old school scrambler, and the green one would be fun. But there is NO WAY IN HELL the scrambler is the coolest Duc out there. My Paul Smart is the best looking model they ever made...except for the '74 750 Sport.

That being said, shifting on my two Ducs is easy, but you need to be firm. No pussy footing with the lever.
Link Posted: 4/30/2015 10:14:48 PM EDT
Well the scrambler is the bike my wife is considering. At 5'2 I am not worried about it being too cramped for her. The weight, horsepower and reviews make it seem like a great all rounder. But with her it is always about the size.

Now that RnineT is the bike I am considering.


We are going to look at both next week.
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