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Posted: 9/30/2011 6:30:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2011 5:57:18 AM EST by Eroic]
I'm smoking a brisket tomorrow but I've got a crappy Brinkman electric smoker. If it's not at least 75 degrees with no wind it doesn't turn out that great. I'm thinking about smoking it for two hours and then transferring it to the oven. Has anyone ever done this before?

Update: Woke up at 0330 to start the brisket on the smoker. Cold and windy out. I put the smoker on the front porch and wrapped the lower half in old sheet to insulate. Started drinking coffee and watching Firefly on youtube. Halfway through the first episode I could start to smell the smoker. I looked out my front window and the whole thing is charred and fucked. Damn near burnt down the house with this one. I melted the siding a bit too. My wife is going to shit a brick when she wakes up. Fuck it. I'm foing back to bed.

Update II: Just woke up a bit ago. When I went back to bed I realized a couple of fingers on my right hand hurt. Apparently I burned them a bit putting the fire out. But when I got back up 30 min ago and got a cup of coffee and toasted myself a bagel, my burn came in contact with a HOT Raisin from the fucking bagel. I'm going to find out from my five year old what's for dinner and inspect the damage.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:33:32 AM EST
yes, wrap with foil and move to the oven.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:34:43 AM EST
I've done that with a bacon sausage log concoction I once made. Came out alright, definitely not the same as letting it smoke the full time though.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:35:23 AM EST
Originally Posted By INI:
yes, wrap with foil and move to the oven.


what temp 200?

pull when meat thermometer says 170. Is that right?
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:36:13 AM EST
Got a garage or carport? Could you cook in it {leave the door open} How many pounds is it? You usually figure 90-ish min. per pound.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:37:30 AM EST
It works fine. I'd smoke it for at least 4 hours though, then wrap in foil and set in the oven at 225*F.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:37:49 AM EST
If you have the time to mess with it, get as much smoke time on it as you can. A brisket stops taking on smoke after 5 hours or so, so give it hell earlier in the day, then foil wrap, and get it into a 225-240 degree oven until you get your core temp where you want it.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:40:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By Eroic:
Originally Posted By INI:
yes, wrap with foil and move to the oven.


what temp 200?

pull when meat thermometer says 170. Is that right?


That's too low. The collagen doesn't begin to turn into gelatin until 180-185*F. I pull mine at 190 and wrap in foil and towels and throw it a cooler for a couple hours to rest.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:40:44 AM EST
2 hours of smoke then oven will work good. I would rather 2 hours of smoke then leave it in smoker for another 2-4 hours to get a good bark. Transfer to the oven on a rack in a roasting pan tightly covered with a small amount of apple juice for moisture. Cook until its 190-195.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:44:59 AM EST
Great info guys.

Now talk to me about your dry rub.

I was planning on doing my standard concoction; seasoned salt, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, white pepper and black pepper, but I'm always looking for something better.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:52:13 AM EST
I use Memphis magic dust,which is actually a pork rub. I've tried other rubs, including the traditional salt and pepper rub, and I like this the best. I always use pecan wood and they complement each very well.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:58:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 7:00:24 AM EST by SAE]
cellery salt

brown sugar

Garlic powder

cummin

chili powder

paprika

black pepper

let set up in fridge for at least four hours.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:58:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 6:59:37 AM EST by bonnevillain]

Originally Posted By Eroic:
I'm smoking a brisket tomorrow but I've got a crappy Brinkman electric smoker. If it's not at least 75 degrees with no wind it doesn't turn out that great. I'm thinking about smoking it for two hours and then transferring it to the oven. Has anyone ever done this before?

I always use the oven, however I smoke the brisket for 7 hours prior. How big is your brisket? I suggest you smoke it as long as you can, remember you are smoking, not heating. I usually start smoking around 5 pm, take off smoker at midnight, wrap in foil and place in oven at 185 till 11 the next morning. Pull out wrap in towels and rest for 2 hours. You can cut that shit with a spoon.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:08:30 AM EST
Originally Posted By AR4U:
It works fine. I'd smoke it for at least 4 hours though, then wrap in foil and set in the oven at 225*F.


I have to agree. You need to smoke it longer than 2 hours or you wont have much of a "smokey" flavor.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:22:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By SAE:
cellery salt

brown sugar

Garlic powder

cummin

chili powder

paprika

black pepper

let set up in fridge for at least four hours.



That sounds good. What's the recipe?
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:25:40 AM EST
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:27:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 8:28:17 AM EST by OleRock02]
I like to pull mine when the temp probe slides in with little resistance. I prefer this over a set internal temp that might vary from one cut of meat to another.


ETA: The internal temp is usually 200 to 205 at this point.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:27:12 AM EST

Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.

Protip: pros dont post this kind of nonsense.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:30:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


When heated connective tissue (collagen) turns into gelatin. Properly prepared brisket is more tender than, say, filet mignon, because it's basically little bits of meat in a gooey matrix of gelatin and melted fat. Only a fool would feed brisket to dogs.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:30:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By OleRock02:
I like to pull mine when the temp probe slides in with little resistance. I prefer this over a set internal temp that might vary from one cut of meat to another.


ETA: The internal temp is usually 200 to 205 at this point.


You can tell by giving it a shake. When it's done, it's floppy.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:35:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


When heated connective tissue (collagen) turns into gelatin. Properly prepared brisket is more tender than, say, filet mignon, because it's basically little bits of meat in a gooey matrix of gelatin and melted fat. Only a fool would feed brisket to dogs.


The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:37:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By Danner130:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


When heated connective tissue (collagen) turns into gelatin. Properly prepared brisket is more tender than, say, filet mignon, because it's basically little bits of meat in a gooey matrix of gelatin and melted fat. Only a fool would feed brisket to dogs.


The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).
Stick to cooking your food in the microwave bud.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:48:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


When heated connective tissue (collagen) turns into gelatin. Properly prepared brisket is more tender than, say, filet mignon, because it's basically little bits of meat in a gooey matrix of gelatin and melted fat. Only a fool would feed brisket to dogs.


The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).


Apparently he's never had GOOD brisket!!

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:54:08 AM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


When heated connective tissue (collagen) turns into gelatin. Properly prepared brisket is more tender than, say, filet mignon, because it's basically little bits of meat in a gooey matrix of gelatin and melted fat. Only a fool would feed brisket to dogs.


The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).


If you want healthy, go eat some fucking grilled tofu.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:00:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By OleRock02:
I like to pull mine when the temp probe slides in with little resistance. I prefer this over a set internal temp that might vary from one cut of meat to another.


ETA: The internal temp is usually 200 to 205 at this point.


You can tell by giving it a shake. When it's done, it's floppy.


Mrs. Winmag said this about me the other night.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:04:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


Pressure cooker does all sorts of wonderful things to low grade meat.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:05:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By 338winmag:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By OleRock02:
I like to pull mine when the temp probe slides in with little resistance. I prefer this over a set internal temp that might vary from one cut of meat to another.


ETA: The internal temp is usually 200 to 205 at this point.


You can tell by giving it a shake. When it's done, it's floppy.


Mrs. Winmag said this about me the other night.


Don't ruin brisket for me, please.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:05:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


When heated connective tissue (collagen) turns into gelatin. Properly prepared brisket is more tender than, say, filet mignon, because it's basically little bits of meat in a gooey matrix of gelatin and melted fat. Only a fool would feed brisket to dogs.


The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).


You's trollin'.





OP,

Ignore this person who claims to be from Texas.

Also, don't get too wrapped up in which rub you use. For the most part, a rub is a rub is a rub.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:48:18 AM EST

Originally Posted By Eroic:
Great info guys.

Now talk to me about your dry rub.

I was planning on doing my standard concoction; seasoned salt, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, white pepper and black pepper, but I'm always looking for something better.

Try the Smoke Ring
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:52:46 AM EST
I prefer to marinade brisket. Recently I've been using Chiavetta's just because it's easily available.

Rub works, too, but I think it forms too thick of a pellicle. Better on a pork butt, IMHO.


If you need your electric smoker to run hotter, you can always throw in a small stainless bowl with a few pieces of charcoal in it.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:53:06 AM EST
Just rub it with Liquid Smoke and roast it in your oven. All the Texans will be along shortly to let you know this is an acceptable substitute.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:56:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).


Brisket fat is high in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, which is good for you.

http://www.cattletoday.com/archive/2008/June/CT1599.shtml
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:56:36 AM EST
Wrap your smoker with a moving blanket or a hot water heater blanket
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 10:01:43 AM EST
I smoke my on a gas grill indirect heat for about 8-10 hours at 200-225. Usually smokes real good for the first 90-120 minutes, then I rotate every 90 or so minutes. I also put a pan of water under the Brisket for moisture. Last one I did pretty much fell apart even after setting for a couple hours.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 10:05:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 10:09:20 AM EST by TheRocketmac]
Originally Posted By Danner130:
blah blah blah...

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


GTFO of Texas! That's something someone from Norman would say..




Edit: To the topic, follow the advice from further up, in the smoker for at least 3 hours with as much smoke as you can get going at temp. Finish in oven on 215-220 (this is where an in-oven thermometer is required) and keep an eye on the temp as ovens don't like to hold temp in that range well. Let cook 75-85Mins / pound (the smoker helped it along a bit @ 3-4 hours), let sit/stand wrapped up for a bit.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 10:47:40 AM EST
Originally Posted By mcnizzle:
Just rub it with Liquid Smoke and roast it in your oven. All the Texans will be along shortly to let you know this is an acceptable substitute.


You're a bad man.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 10:50:55 AM EST
Originally Posted By TapperMan:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).


Brisket fat is high in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, which is good for you.

http://www.cattletoday.com/archive/2008/June/CT1599.shtml


That's awesome. I just sent that to the lady so she won't give me so much crap about eating the point.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 10:57:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


When heated connective tissue (collagen) turns into gelatin. Properly prepared brisket is more tender than, say, filet mignon, because it's basically little bits of meat in a gooey matrix of gelatin and melted fat. Only a fool would feed brisket to dogs.


The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).


You's trollin'.





OP,

Ignore this person who claims to be from Texas.

Also, don't get too wrapped up in which rub you use. For the most part, a rub is a rub is a rub.



I cook a brisket every year on the first of October. My oldest son was born five years ago tomorrow in San Antonio. It's our annual celebration of our favorite Texan. 15 more years and I get to introduce him to Pearl beer and lone star!
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:03:53 AM EST
This thread is worthless without pics... my most recent brisket.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:05:05 AM EST
Originally Posted By bonnevillain:

Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.

Protip: pros dont post this kind of nonsense.


He's a heretic. Smoked brisket is a gift from God. Must be some kinda Yankee who likes tiptoeing through the tulips.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:07:15 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 11:26:29 AM EST by topknot]

Originally Posted By Eroic:
Great info guys.

Now talk to me about your dry rub.

I was planning on doing my standard concoction; seasoned salt, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, white pepper and black pepper, but I'm always looking for something better.

http://texasbbqrub.com/no2.htm

What I do is the night before, rub the brisket with a slurry of Worchestershire sauce and old number 2 brisket rub, place in plastic bag in fridge to marinate overnight. In the AM I fire up my Brinkman smoker (use charcoal and wood). I put the brisket (fat side DOWN) on for 2-3 hours then bring it inside and wrap it in foil and put it in a electric turkey roaster. Your oven would work just as well. Set temp at 225 or so.

I let it slow cook there for another 7or 8 hours. When the internal temp is 190, you're good. This is a great way to have the smoke flavor (yes you will have the smoke ring in the meat), but much easier to control than the cheap Brinkman to stay in the ideal range.

Let rest for 30-45 minutes, then carve it up. I like to make my "Bill Millers" marinated onions to go with it and some spicy beans. Makes a great meal. Some corn bread too, and a nice glass of iced tea!

Let me know if you want the recipe for the marinated onions and/or pinto beans.





Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:22:18 AM EST
Dry Rub I use.

1/4 cup Dark Brown Sugar
1/4 cup Kosher Salt
1/4 cup Paprika
3 Tablespoons Fresh Ground Pepper
1 Tablespoon Garlic Powder
1 Tablespoon Dried Onion Flakes
1 Teaspoon Chili Powder
1/2 Teaspoon Celery Seed
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:40:09 AM EST
Dammit, You guys are making me hungry! Posting pics and all.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:42:09 AM EST
Smoke for 4 hrs.

Put in oven until internal temp is 205.

Place in coleman cooler(on towels) for 2-3 hrs.

Enjoy.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:46:09 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 12:09:34 PM EST
I smoke them at 225 until the internal temp is at 185 for slicing or 195 for chopping. (normally 195). This task anywhere from 10 to 16 hours. I use apple, pecan, or cherry wood.

When pulled I wrap in foil, pour in 1/4 cup apple juice, seal it up, wrap in towels, and place in an insulated cooler for an hour or till dinner. It will stay above 140 for several hours this way.

Good luck!

Onyx
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 12:59:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


I respect your opinion but...
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:00:34 PM EST
I do it all the time
Works great!
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:49:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By Danner130:
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Brisket is very low grade meat with all kinds of connective tissues and collagen that need to be rendered before it is edible. You cook it at a low temperature of a long, long time to accomplish this. 10-12 hours is not uncommon, in the 200's degree range. Smoking is nice for flavor.

Protip: buy a better grade of meat, and leave the brisket for the dogs.


When heated connective tissue (collagen) turns into gelatin. Properly prepared brisket is more tender than, say, filet mignon, because it's basically little bits of meat in a gooey matrix of gelatin and melted fat. Only a fool would feed brisket to dogs.


The balance of protein and fat in brisket is ideal for dogs (and terrible for humans).


Link Posted: 10/1/2011 1:59:34 AM EST
Bump for reasons
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 2:01:59 AM EST
Originally Posted By Eroic:
Bump for reasons


in b4 pics
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