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Posted: 6/19/2003 2:51:57 PM EDT
I am the slowest runner in the world I am in decent shape about 170lbs 6' I am only 19 and running is a real weakness for me. today I ran a mile and it took me 8 and a half minutes!!! i Was running in boots in a alley but it still shouldn't take me that long. anywho I haven't ran for probably a year and also I have been going to the gym and mostly doing arms, shoulders and chest. so should I just practice running? or should I do some other exercises. also is it better too run a long distance like 3 miles without stopping or run a single mile than take a break and run again. thanks
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 5:05:02 PM EDT
Dont be a CURL JOCKEY!!! Just working arms shoulders and chest is a huge mistake I see a lot of people making. What about your legs and back?? These are the 2 biggest muscle groups in your body and you are totally neglecting them. I could go on for hours about how doing legs postively affects your whole body. I dont know anything about running though so I can't help you in that department.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 6:25:37 PM EDT
Oh I forgot to ad back I do back also just haven't been doing legs what should I do?
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 6:29:12 PM EDT
Dude, ya gotta squat. I can't emphysise it enough. Squat, squat, squat till you puke. When I was a teen, I did the all show muscles - chest & arms w/some abs...occasionally. I just wasn't gaining like I thought I should. Then my dad (a late 50s early 60s muscle beach type) put me on a squat routine. And guess what? Yep, I started gaining strength and muscle. Don't neglect your legs and your back. They are the foundation of your bodies' strength. As far as running, I don't think squatting will help your run times. Just hasn't been MY experience. It may be different for you though. Everyone is different in thier reaction to physical training. I would just run 3 days/week, lift 3 days/week and take 1 day off to rest. Your young, you can recover well enough. Experiment, see what works for you. As always YMMV...
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 7:14:28 PM EDT
The only squats that might help you with long-distance running are 20 rep squats. Put a small amount of weight on the bar, and do it 20 times. I don't care how strong you are, if you can do 1/2 your 1RM 20 times, you're tough. Also, I like deadlifts. They tend to hit your hamstrings harder than squats which is good for runners, and they'll also help your traps and grip.
better too run a long distance like 3 miles without stopping or run a single mile than take a break and run again.
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What are your goals? What do you want? Do you want to be in better shape in general? Do you want a good 1 mile time? Do you want a better 3 mile time? I think that has to be answered before deciding what type of training would be best for you.z
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:31:53 PM EDT
In my heavy squatting days(405 for reps) I couldn't run worth a crap either. Because my job requires that I be able to run well, I've backed off on the leg routine. Now, I rarely go above 225 for reps. But, I can run two miles in under 13:00. Anyways, I would suggest a high rep, light weight squat routine. Most importantly, you need to RUN to get better at running. Try doing interval training. Run really fast for a 1/8 mile, then slow jog 1/4 mile, then repeat the cycle for 4 times. I wouldn't advise "stopping and then running again", just slow down. You need to set goals. Do you want to be able to jog 5 miles or run 1 mile in 6:00? Each requires slightly different training. For instance, the Army, God bless it, requires me to run 2 miles in 13:00 to be "excellent". But, many units train with long, slow, formation runs that don't prepare one for a 2 mile "race".
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 6:02:18 AM EDT
i'm going to army boot camp so I want to be a decent runner.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 7:08:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2003 7:09:25 AM EDT by Bailey]
Originally Posted By 1911greg: i'm going to army boot camp so I want to be a decent runner.
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You [b]will[/b] be a decent runner when you get out of boot camp! You may want to wait until this fall to join up; boot camp in July and August would not be pretty.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 7:12:11 AM EDT
ah, then I can offer sound advice. I scored a 351 on my final PT test at basic. You'll learn what the scores mean later. Your standards are: Push-ups- 42 in two minutes at minimum. 71 for excellent Sit-ups- 58, I think, at minimum, and 78 to max-out. 2 mile run- 15:54 minimum, 13:00 to max out To train for that run you need to be running anywhere from 1.5 to 3 miles, but running FAST. Get a stop watch. There is little benefit in running 5 miles at a slow jogging pace, when training for a race. If you want to max-out your run. Start with one mile on a track or flat road. Run it as fast as you can and time yourself. Keep running that 1 mile 4-5 times a week until you can do it in 6:30. Then add 1/4 mile at a time, keeping the same pace, until you can do 2 miles in 13:00. Wala! You've done it.
Link Posted: 6/20/2003 10:43:45 AM EDT
Originally Posted By MP906: ah, then I can offer sound advice. I scored a 351 on my final PT test at basic. You'll learn what the scores mean later. Your standards are: Push-ups- 42 in two minutes at minimum. 71 for excellent Sit-ups- 58, I think, at minimum, and 78 to max-out. 2 mile run- 15:54 minimum, 13:00 to max out To train for that run you need to be running anywhere from 1.5 to 3 miles, but running FAST. Get a stop watch. There is little benefit in running 5 miles at a slow jogging pace, when training for a race. If you want to max-out your run. Start with one mile on a track or flat road. Run it as fast as you can and time yourself. Keep running that 1 mile 4-5 times a week until you can do it in 6:30. Then add 1/4 mile at a time, keeping the same pace, until you can do 2 miles in 13:00. Wala! You've done it.
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thanks for the help you guys always have good info! I will keep you posted.
Link Posted: 6/21/2003 4:16:12 AM EDT
find a speed agility coach at a local school,let them analize your running technic. sounds like you are running on your heels and not your toes. leg routines for you would be as suggested by zoom hi rep low weight. your calves are weak as well,practice running stadiums on just your calves. josam
Link Posted: 6/21/2003 2:23:19 PM EDT
too many people just try to work there arms without doing the rest of their body. but acutally building more muscle on your upper body isn't going to help you run better thats just more weight.
Link Posted: 6/22/2003 6:56:33 PM EDT
You want to run heel to toe, unless you are sprinting, then you stay on your toes.
Link Posted: 6/23/2003 10:00:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/23/2003 10:02:49 AM EDT by kato4moto]
Originally Posted By MP906: You want to run heel to toe, unless you are sprinting, then you stay on your toes.
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Do what comes naturally. I started as a heel-striker but gradually transitioned to more of a midfoot/toe-striker. All of my PRs from the mile to the marathon have been achieved as a midfoot/toe runner. Study lots of the track stars, and you'll notice that a number of them are toe runners (Haile Gebreselassie, Suzy Favor Hamilton are just two that come to mind). I've tried switching back to landing on my heels now that I'm older and a lot slower, but it just doesn't feel natural plus it seems more jarring. Whatever style you employ, just make sure you land with your foot directly underneath your knee. If you're overstriding (landing with your foot in front of the knee), you're wasting energy because you're actually slowing yourself down. You want to generate maximum power when pushing off from whatever foot's on the ground at the time; think of it as clawing or pawing at the ground. Good luck and good running! [:)] Edited to fix quote length.
Link Posted: 6/23/2003 12:31:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/23/2003 12:33:09 PM EDT by WesDesRat]
I was a distance runner in high school... first off, foot strike does make a difference. Your midfoot or ball of the foot should strike, just before your heel, technically speaking. But just run, if you do it long enough, your body will "train" itself. Dont lean back going downhill, it's harder on your ankles and dosn't let gravity help you down the hill; lean into the downhills slightly. If you want to run faster than 7 minute miles, mix long slow distance runs (3-5 miles) with short interval training (running the straights and jogging the curves on an outdoor track for 2 miles or 8x400 meter laps). Also have one "short run" day; a two mile jog, slow and easy. Get tons of sleep, alternate lifting and running, and if you notice a "plateau" in performance, you are probably working too hard or not resting enough. Also, on the distance runs... if you cant carry on a conversation because you are breathing too hard, your going too fast (at least when you are starting out). WATER...drink tons of water, and try to eat high protien and carbs within 30-45 minutes of working out. In my peak days, I ran 45-70 miles a week, lifted (squats, abs, light chest and arms+ pushups and situps) and could out squat most of the football players on the team, though they weighed twice as much as me. I ran under 5 minute miles, and under 16 minutes for the 5k/3mile. My heart rate was somewhere around 48 BPM...(those were the days) Get some good running shoes too... x-trainers will leave ya hurt. PM me if you'd like a few ideas to mix the training up... I've done just about all of it, though I admit I'm out of shape right now [beer]
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