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Posted: 12/17/2016 8:37:00 AM EST
I heated my skillets up on the stove last night just enough to melt the armour lard I bought a bucket of at walmart.
I then used a paper towel to wipe them down and then (as per youtube instructions) I wiped as much off as I could with a dry paper towel leaving them metal saturated but not runny/wet

I then put them in the oven of 450 for an hour. the smaller more porus skillet looked a shade darker, but still like rough bare cast iron. nothing like the pans I've seen online. the larger one with the smoother cooking surface actually looked like the lard formed little dark micro beads all over the cooking surface, other than that it was again just a shade almost rusty looking bit darker.

I thought I was just not agressive enough so I tried again and they just look runny now since I didn't wipe the excess off before baking.

how do you get dark black color? and what's up with the beads?

these are totally oven cleaner stripped and derusted pans that have been in a basement for god knows how many years.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 8:38:49 AM EST
Rinse and repeat.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 8:40:48 AM EST
I've done a bunch using the method below. Works perfectly.

How to season cast iron
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 8:42:18 AM EST
they get darker with use, don't worry about it. I have around 16 pieces from skillets to a wok and grill 
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 8:44:08 AM EST
The black you want will come with use. The dropletts is where  you used too much oil. It is not a 1 step process. Do like you did originally 3 or 4 times, and make sure you turn them up side down in oven.
Next coat should make it darker, and will get darker every time you use it.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 8:44:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2016 8:46:52 AM EST by johnspark]
Originally Posted By DocBull:
Rinse and repeat.
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Thread topic or the pan?
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 8:51:14 AM EST
The beads are probably from too much lard.

The pan will darken from use...corn bread, bacon, and grilled cheese seem to accelerate the process. Don't worry about it and cook!

I use an outdoor turkey fryer type burner for the initial seasoning or re-seasoning. Heat the pan, apply your favorite fat, spread it out with a paper towel down to a thin coat. Turn the pan upside down and move the pan around over the flame until the surface darkens. Repeat this several times until you are happy. Do not use too much fat. Thin coats are key. Also - you can overheat the pan and then you'll be starting over or I imagine in the worst case you could warp the pan.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 8:55:32 AM EST
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Originally Posted By pedaler:
The beads are probably from too much lard.

The pan will darken from use...corn bread, bacon, and grilled cheese seem to accelerate the process. Don't worry about it and cook!

I use an outdoor turkey fryer type burner for the initial seasoning or re-seasoning. Heat the pan, apply your favorite fat, spread it out with a paper towel down to a thin coat. Turn the pan upside down and move the pan around over the flame until the surface darkens. Repeat this several times until you are happy. Do not use too much fat. Thin coats are key. Also - you can overheat the pan and then you'll be starting over or I imagine in the worst case you could warp the pan.
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Grilled cheese works really well. That's all I cooked in a new Lodge for the first 5 or so times.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 8:57:56 AM EST
will the beads go away with use? or do I need to strip it and start over?

also, will unevenness smooth out with use?
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:02:40 AM EST
Cook shit in it! Eat bacon 3-4 x a week and fry all of your burger in it. Use a metal spatula also. It ain't rocket science
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:04:53 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bmw20:
Cook shit in it! Eat bacon 3-4 x a week and fry all of your burger in it. Use a metal spatula also. It ain't rocket science
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I intend to use metal, same reason I love my anodized aluminum pans. I hate teflon and other "fragile" coatings
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:08:14 AM EST
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Originally Posted By quick2k3:



Grilled cheese works really well. That's all I cooked in a new Lodge for the first 5 or so times.
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This. I don't get why people obsesse over seasoning cast iron. Cook some bacon, sausage, grilled cheese, or any other greasy food in it several times, and you're good to go. 
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:08:20 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bmw20:
Cook shit in it! Eat bacon 3-4 x a week and fry all of your burger in it. Use a metal spatula also. It ain't rocket science
View Quote

Correct, just cook some greasy foods for the first few meals and then you should be good to go.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:09:37 AM EST
Grilled cheese (using butter) puts a seasoned coating on pretty quick, as does frying eggs in butter. My wife kills the seasoning in my pans at least once a month--usually too much heat with no oil/lard/butter for whatever she's cooking--luckily I cook eggs just about every morning.

Don't worry, just keep cooking and the pan will eventually get where it needs to be.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:15:23 AM EST
Cast Iron is meant to be used a lot, to gain a dark patina. The more you cook with it the better it will look.

I cook all my Steaks on cast Iron



Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:16:22 AM EST
Originally Posted By netofficer3710:
I heated my skillets up on the stove last night just enough to melt the armour lard I bought a bucket of at walmart.
I then used a paper towel to wipe them down and then (as per youtube instructions) I wiped as much off as I could with a dry paper towel leaving them metal saturated but not runny/wet

I then put them in the oven of 450 for an hour. the smaller more porus skillet looked a shade darker, but still like rough bare cast iron. nothing like the pans I've seen online. the larger one with the smoother cooking surface actually looked like the lard formed little dark micro beads all over the cooking surface, other than that it was again just a shade almost rusty looking bit darker.

I thought I was just not agressive enough so I tried again and they just look runny now since I didn't wipe the excess off before baking.

how do you get dark black color? and what's up with the beads?

these are totally oven cleaner stripped and derusted pans that have been in a basement for god knows how many years.
View Quote


- Let your pan come up to temperature (300deg) in the oven so it preheats evenly. Not on the stove top.
- Thin coat of Crisco. I have no idea what Armour Lard is. Sounds like something you wipe down leather boots with.
- Pan back into oven. Bring oven up 500. Then shut it down.
- Do Not Remove The Pan From The Oven. Do not open the oven door. Let the coating cure unmolested.
- Check back 6-8hrs later after everything has returned to room temperature.
- Repeat if necessary.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:17:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2016 9:18:11 AM EST by wicketsurplus]
Use them, or throw them down the driveway.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:19:25 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By wicketsurplus:
Use them.
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This.

Just cook some bacon in it.

Rinse it off.

Eat bacon.

Then cook some more bacon in it.

You get the idea. The answer is bacon.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:21:53 AM EST
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Originally Posted By wicketsurplus:
Use them, or throw them down the driveway.
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Yep
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:22:14 AM EST
start with sanding.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:22:41 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bmw20:
Cook shit in it! Eat bacon 3-4 x a week and fry all of your burger in it. Use a metal spatula also. It ain't rocket science
View Quote

It really is that simple.  
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:23:14 AM EST
I tried for years to get cast iron to work like everyone says it did. Always had problems. Then I tried out Carbon Steel and it turned out to be everything I expected Cast Iron to be.

Easier to maintain, more non-stick, lighter.

Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:25:04 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PeculiarSatyr:
I tried for years to get cast iron to work like everyone says it did. Always had problems. Then I tried out Carbon Steel and it turned out to be everything I expected Cast Iron to be.

Easier to maintain, more non-stick, lighter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-suTmUX4Vbk
View Quote



Durp
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:32:47 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
start with sanding.
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Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:33:42 AM EST
As others have said, the initial seasoning is to put your first layer on it and help keep stuff from sticking right off of the bat. Just cook greasy food with it, nothing acidic for a while or itll pretty much strip the pan. Also use metal spatulas on it, it will help keep the coating even.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:34:43 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mitchellh:
Cast Iron is meant to be used a lot, to gain a dark patina. The more you cook with it the better it will look.

I cook all my Steaks on cast Iron<img src=http://www.ar15.com/images/smilies/icon_smile_wink.gif border=0 align=middle>

http://i61.tinypic.com/2qd94ef.jpg

http://i62.tinypic.com/fkutqp.jpg
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Oh my... red meat on cast iron INSIDE a grill...?

This photo could start a war the likes of which hasn't been seen since beans vs. no beans.

Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:35:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2016 9:39:25 AM EST by cttb]
Just get them as hot as you possibly can on the stove or a hot grill, take some paper towels soaked in vegetable oil, and wipe the skillet with the paper towels. It works just as well as any other method. The best thing you can do for cast iron is cook in it with fat.

The chemistry involved in seasoning cast iron is very simple. It only takes heat and fat to make it work. Repetition improves the function of the end result. In other words, cook with it.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:38:51 AM EST
Cook bacon and greasy burgers and repeat.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:44:41 AM EST
Put it in the oven at high heat (500*) to speed up the darkening process. I had a few spots left from excess oil too. Cooked some bacon in the pan and they disappeared.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:49:23 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BeRzErKaS:


Oh my... red meat on cast iron INSIDE a grill...?

This photo could start a war the likes of which hasn't been seen since beans vs. no beans.
View Quote

Ever notice high end grills have Cast iron grates and griddles? 
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:52:58 AM EST
As mentioned use it a lot. 
I got mine going by cooking nacho's in it. I'd ward eerything up on the stovetop,. then throw the whole shebang up the broiler in the oven so it turns all golden and crispy. 
Then once everything was dumped off, I'd put the pan back under the broiler for a little bit with nothing but the remaining cheese grease. 
Then just cooked steaks in the over with it a bunch. 


Easiest way is to not try hard. It seems cast iron only defeats people that worry too much or try to hard. 
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:56:10 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bmw20:
Cook shit in it! Eat bacon 3-4 x a week and fry all of your burger in it. Use a metal spatula also. It ain't rocket science
View Quote




Sometimes easiest is the best.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 9:58:03 AM EST
The surface of your skillet will smooth out with use.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:02:22 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PeculiarSatyr:
I tried for years to get cast iron to work like everyone says it did. Always had problems. Then I tried out Carbon Steel and it turned out to be everything I expected Cast Iron to be.

Easier to maintain, more non-stick, lighter.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-suTmUX4Vbk
View Quote


I have a full set of Lodge cast iron, a full set of Matfer Bourgeat carbon steel, and a full set of All-Clad tri-ply.

I use them all, but if I had to pick one it would be the carbon steel - without question. Once seasoned properly they are excellent at everything.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:02:57 AM EST
I've found the Lodge brand of "pre seasoned " cast iron to be too rough.

I hit mine with a flapper wheel and then sand paper. Washed it out and used bacon grease to recure it.

It works great now.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:03:53 AM EST
If your cast iron sits for a while unused it may develop a rancid smell. Don't worry. Just heat it up and wipe it down good with some grease until the smell is gone, then resume cooking.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:04:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2016 10:04:28 AM EST by highstepper]
OP, I present to you The Cast Iron Whisperer. Once we learned this, things got better.

https://richsoil.com/cast-iron.jsp
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:14:05 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
start with sanding.
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And then don't use fucking animal fats to season a bare iron.

Use something that can withstand a higher temp. Lot's of opinions on this... I've always used Canola oil, several applications and then using and cleaning properly...
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:17:45 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BeRzErKaS:


Oh my... red meat on cast iron INSIDE a grill...?

This photo could start a war the likes of which hasn't been seen since beans vs. no beans.
View Quote


Does this work better for you

Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:34:55 AM EST
Cleaning is where most people fuck up, get one of these. The Ringer Hot water and scrub any cling on's with it dry and your GTG.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:39:17 AM EST
Flax oil.  Oven.  At least 5 times.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:40:37 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bmw20:
Cook shit in it! Eat bacon 3-4 x a week and fry all of your burger in it. Use a metal spatula also. It ain't rocket science
View Quote

This, the KISS method.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 10:46:39 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Warrior102:
Cleaning is where most people fuck up, get one of these. The Ringer Hot water and scrub any cling on's with it dry and your GTG.
View Quote

Regular old dish soap won't hurt your seasoning. Then again I don't baby my $30 Lodge pans. Hell my dutch oven just spent 7 hours in the oven at 300 filled with tomatoes. 
Just use them. Greasy food early on helps. I think the biggest issue with people new to cast iron, isn't the seasoning. Its adjusting to the right amount of heat to use for their application. A $15 IR thermometer would be a wise investment. 
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:24:40 AM EST
On the first seasoning stick in over upside down at 250* for 10-15 minutes then rewipe out what may start to pool of fat. Then rightside up at 450- 475* for a hour then turn off and cool. Repeat 2-4 more times if you want too.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:27:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2016 11:37:32 AM EST by AeroE]
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:30:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2016 11:33:14 AM EST by Thedude27]
Extremely thin layer, multiple times. Like painting.


Depending on what brand you might want to sand the inside to smooth out the casting so the will work as well as the old grswolds while there is no seasoning.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 11:31:29 AM EST
Cook bacon, eat bacon, repeat as needed.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 2:37:50 PM EST
I'm going to echo what these dudes said. Cook greasy food in it. No soap when washing and use warm (not hot) water.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 2:47:24 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AeroE:
Just use the damn skillets. Make certain they are sanitary before cooking.

The cast iron cookware fetish at this site is incredible, just like a cult with people clamoring to join. A cult of gossipy old women collected into their little insular klatches.
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100% this.
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