Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/21/2004 10:26:41 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:47:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2004 10:47:41 AM EST by SGB]
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 1:30:38 PM EST
I get shin splints too, they're almost always what limits how far/fast I run. SGB's right, you need to back down your training, and just try to do some cross-training to make up for it. Shin splints are usually a overuse injury, and may just mean you jumped up your training level too fast. Back down your mileage, both for the week and per run, then gradually bring it back up. Also, make sure you're stretching well, both before and after running. This can help.
New shoes may help some. I would suggest going to a running store, and telling them that you get shin splints. They'll be able to recommend a more heavily cushioned shoe, which may help some.
I take it you're running on concrete sidewalks? If you can do it safely, blacktop is softer then concrete (that's what I've been told) and grass is better. If a road you run on regularly is crowned, this can make your left leg get shin splints faster, as (if you're running against traffic) it "falls" farther/hits harder then your other leg. One of the things I try to do is run on some grass at time, and this doesn't seem to be as bad on my shins. Be careful where, 'cause you don't want to twist an ankle or something. Soccer fields are often good places.
Hope this helps.
DP
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 7:57:26 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:09:55 PM EST
When I started running more seriously (marathon training), I was a few-times-a-week runner and logged most of my miles on the sidewalks. That and the primitive shoes at the time contributed (along with the increased mileage and my body's slower adaptation to the stresses of the sport) to shin splints fairly regularly.

I used to try to run through the pain, which worked okay once I got warmed up, but the pain would return. Using the usual modalities (icing the area post-run, more diligent stretching) helped a bit but not entirely.

Sometimes, it would get so severely painful that trips to the student health center (X-rays, ultrasound) confirmed the shin splints evolved into stress fractures.

So, first of all, make sure you've got good running shoes in good condition. Try the icing and stretching routines. Cut back on your miles or time spent running. If this doesn't work, then perhaps consider stopping and trying an alternative form of cardiovascular exercise. It sucks to not be able to run, but stress fractures will force you to take six weeks off. HTH
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 9:51:25 PM EST
Ice and stretch.

Switch days between running and swimming. Make sure to keep the same intensity with swimming. Biking works too.

Learn to tape your feet. I recommend shaving your feet before doing that, pulling the tape off of hairy feet is quite painful.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 7:34:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/24/2004 7:36:25 AM EST by Thunderbolt]
*you need a new pair of running shoes [very important] dont use running shoes until the soles are all worn down, thats too late, running shoes need replacement every 6 - 8 months if you use them regularly on the pavement.

*maybe your running "style" is the problem? do your shoes make a stomping sound when you run? a sloppy running style can cause shin splints, make sure to run so your stride is easy and your feet dont pound into the pavement, a low easy stride, I often change my running style to put less stress on the joints.

*shin splints take several weeks to heal, take it easy on your running and get some good running shoes
or do more brisk walking until the pain goes away.

Link Posted: 8/24/2004 7:43:36 AM EST
when i ran track in highschool, we always sat with our legs in a trash can full of ice water after practice if we had shin splints. it didn't really help at all. but then, nobody around my school would give me a straight answer on what shin splints actually were, though they all seemed to think it was a muscle problem from the treatments they suggested. heat, cold, ibuprofen, none of it helped.

what kato4moto says about shin splints being a bone problem is something i would agree with. mine never got better until i had stopped running for a while
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 7:51:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By Kazimir:
when i ran track in highschool, we always sat with our legs in a trash can full of ice water after practice if we had shin splints. it didn't really help at all. but then, nobody around my school would give me a straight answer on what shin splints actually were, though they all seemed to think it was a muscle problem from the treatments they suggested. heat, cold, ibuprofen, none of it helped.

what kato4moto says about shin splints being a bone problem is something i would agree with. mine never got better until i had stopped running for a while



I have always been told that it's caused by small pieces of muscle tearing away from the shin.

I am currently in high school so maybe they know a bit more about it now.

Oh - I forgot one thing. There's an exercise you can do to strengthen your shins. Stand up on your tip-toes, but with your eyes closed. The small movements your body makes to stay straight will use those muscles. Also play with a sock, dish rag, etc. with your toes. These are two things my track/CC coach suggested.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 11:12:49 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 2:11:21 PM EST
Ah, I know the shoes you're talking about. Probably about $130?

I'm lucky that I absolutely fell in love with a pair that were on sale for $50.

They were/are Adidas Climacool shoes of some kind. They let lots and lots of air in, are lightweight, and most of all comfortable. Certainly look weird too.

Oh and trust me, my shoes are uglier than yours.

The new shoes won't prevent shin splints (unless a miracle happens) but they should cut down on the pain. Ice, and swim or bike. The key is, you've got to keep the same level of intensity. It's easy to ease up the pace while you're biking, coast downhills, etc. Same with swimming. You've got to keep the kind of intensity you have while running, and it will be as effective. Your best bet would probably be this: (B = biking, S = swimming, R = running)

Week 1 & 2:

R B R S (repeat)

Weeks 3-6:

R R B R R S (repeat)

I don't remember if you said whether or not you had a bike, if not replace biking with swimming.

And ALWAYS stretch well. If you need help stretching properly please let me know and I will give instructions, take pictures, whatever.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 2:19:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/24/2004 2:24:50 PM EST by MT_Pockets]
LINK

I seemed to get them frequently when I was logging and the mud (seemed like 50lbs of it) would cake up on my boots or I was on a sidehill all day.

Running has always been to jarring of an activity for me. So I have found other exercise to keep my heart rate up. All my physician recommended was a daily 30 minute fast paced walk.

MT
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 3:05:30 PM EST
I usedto run 8 miles a day, or so. Shin splints would come and go. As I got older, and was made to run in combat boots, they became a regular thing when I run, even now - years later.

My shin splints are caused by irratation of the sheath surrounding muscles in my lower legs.

The best thing I did to get rid of them was to stop running. Biking, walking, horseback riding is what I do now. I ran a half mile the other day, and got a case of shin splints from it that took 10 days to go away.

Running is hard on shins, ankles, knees, hips, and the lower back.

Trade your running for swimming or biking, your joints will thank you when you hit 50.
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 9:22:58 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 9:43:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By new-arguy:
Well, I went back on how long I wanted to take a break from running and busted out the new space shoes last night. I went back to only running a mile and a half and had no issues with shin splints. I finished very quickly and the gym was open so I went in there and rode the stationary bike for about 10 more minutes, did some sit ups and lifted some weights for a very little bit. I can say I was sweating like a pig. I dont remember the last time I was dripping sweat like that?! I may go and run again tonight, or maybe swim. We'll see what it looks like.

Like I said, I am down 15 pounds to 175 since May, but I still feel like I want to lose some more weight around my waiste. Thats why I started the sit ups Any other suggestions?



If you're in this to lose weight, do as much cardio as you can, all the time.

Sit ups will help, running, swimming, biking, etc.

Anything that gets your heart pumping for a long time (10+ minutes).
Link Posted: 8/26/2004 11:10:06 AM EST
Shin splints and stress fractures are two diferent things. When I was in the Corps I ran a lot. Training at one point to run the Marine Corps Marathon. Pain became unbearable and I was told it was just shin splints, got a script for corpman candy (Motrin) and kept running.

I would stretch extensively before and after, ice, heat, corpman candy, nothing worked. Finally, my Capt. who's a marathon runner, defined the two ailments and diagnosed me with stress fractures. He was right. To this day, the medial aspects of my tibia's feel like a washboard from the calcium build-up and is still tender to the touch, (after ten years).

It's not common, but not unheard of, for a marathon runner to suffer a compound tib/fib fracture while running because of the severity of the stress fractures. Some people just seem to be more prone than others.

Stress fractures cause pain to the medial aspect (inside) of the tibia (shin bone). Run your fingers down the edge of the bone just in front of your calf muscle. If that causes pain, it's prbably stress fractures. Shin splints typically cause pain to the anterior (front) and lateral (outside) of the lower leg and is muscular in nature.

Hope this helps. My advice...swim!

Semper Fi!
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 11:09:41 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 7:40:37 PM EST
The way I prevent shin splints is to walk on my heels with as much toe up as I can.

After 60 or so steps, the shin muscles start hurting bad, but try not to puss out:
Work your way up to 100 steps (50 each foot).

This will tighten the shin muscles up to the bone.

Jay
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 8:04:54 PM EST
I used to have the same trouble. Now, it only creeps up on long runs. Here is what I did:

1. Go to a running store. Have them watch you walk, and let them recommend a good pair of shoes for the way you walk. Typically, most people fally into a "stability" shoe, such as the NB 765, or Asics GT-2090. Remember, running shoes are often a full size larger than you would typically wear.... people often wear too small a shoe and dont know it.

2. Get potassium. Believe it or not, a lot of shin pain is muscle related, and making sure you get enough potassium helps this. Potatoes and bananas are good sources. Being on something like Atkins is a killer for runners because of this.

3. Run slower, and longer distances at first. Try pacing yourself for a 10 minute mile, and make longer runs.... push yourself. Only stop if you are in serious pain.... Dont try to go anaerobic at first.... focus on staying inside your target heart rate, and do longer distances.

4. STRETCH. Never stretch cold. Always walk/light jog .5 to 1 mile FIRST as a warmup, then stretch. Stretch shins, thighs, hamstrings, and calves. Then run. Then walk for a cooldown. Then stretch again. Stretching correctly with a good warmup and cooldown will control pain better than anything else you do.


I did all these... and my shin problems, while still prevalent, are far less painful. Runs under 3 miles, and I dont even feel them. I did a triathlon the other day (my first one) and had some shin pain, but it was manageable.

6 months ago, I had never run more than a mile in my life, and that was 10 years ago. Now I am doing 4 on a regular basis... and hope to move up to 6-10 on occasion.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:22:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By Sniper_Wolfe:

Learn to tape your feet.



Could you elaborate? I've finally gotten back into running after taking about three months off due to the shin pain/stress fracture?? and got custom orthotics made by a Dr. (which helps). I am not a small guy not fat just big (205+@6'4") and I have a PFT monthly, so I'm having to run quite a bit. Anything i can do to avoid having problems again is something that I will be all over.

Thanks
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 5:35:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By lokt:

Originally Posted By Sniper_Wolfe:

Learn to tape your feet.



Could you elaborate? I've finally gotten back into running after taking about three months off due to the shin pain/stress fracture?? and got custom orthotics made by a Dr. (which helps). I am not a small guy not fat just big (205+@6'4") and I have a PFT monthly, so I'm having to run quite a bit. Anything i can do to avoid having problems again is something that I will be all over.

Thanks



Hmm, this will be pretty hard to explain over the internet but I'll try.

Take a piece of medical tape, probably 2 ft long or so (you'll figure out how long you need). Rip it in half (lengthwise, obviousy).

Take the middle of the medical tape and place it on the rear part of your heel (about the place where people get blisters if they don't wear socks, or maybe a little below that). Wrap one side around the right, and around the left, and make it go under the foot (should go 'under' about halfway up your foot). Then the two ends should criss-cross a little before the ball of your foot. Then take a piece of medical tape (leave it on the roll, you really don't know how much you'll need). Start on the outside top of your foot, a little to the outside of the center. The top of the tape should run near the bottom of your pinky toe. Then wrap it around, down underneath (should hold on your long half strip), and up to the other side. The two ends don't have to meet, some people make them meet and some don't. Do this again, moving down the foot (towards the heel) but overlapping. 3 strips should be good. Repeat for other foot.


I realize these are hard directions to understand...if you need I can take some step-by-step pics.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 7:35:14 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/12/2004 8:44:01 PM EST
www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/0161.htm

There is a lot of information to be found at this site wrt to shin splits and treatment regimens. I have used a majority of the exercises listed in this article to help treat and, most importantly prevent shin splints from interfering with my training. Check out the rest of this site - there is an abundance of information about every aspect of training that comes to mind.
Link Posted: 9/14/2004 11:20:22 AM EST
I had shin splints last year. It became such a debilitating condition that I almost couldn't walk normally. I attribute the severity of the condition to starting too hard a training regiment while being out of shape, running too many hills, being overweight by by 40 to 50 lbs, running in the wrong type shoes for my weight.

I had to stop running completely to cure it, and loose some wieght by other means, i.e. mountain biking. I have started running a little now with no problems, but it make me very nervous.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 3:40:32 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 8:02:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By new-arguy:
Im down to 170, which is a big suprise to me. When I started I was hoping to lose ten pounds and get down to 180. I've been running a lot more, probably 5 times a week on average. I increased my distance slightly (an extra block, long block though) and dont have many problems with the shin splints. I can feel them but there isnt pain. I stretch much more than when I started and I suppose the shoes helped too. I havent been swimming much at all though. Running is a lot more fun for me. Still wish I didnt lose my breath as much.



Way to go, New! Sounds like you're discovering what many of us have discovered: Running is probably the best way to lose weight. (And seeing the weight come off is a mental reinforcer.)

One thing: If you're out of breath, you're trying too hard to push the pace. While that does get your heart rate up, you're probably going a little too fast for your current level of conditioning/fitness. So slow down. You actually burn fat quite efficiently while cruising along at a pace where you can hold a brief conversation, and the reduced pace allows you to go longer. The amount of time spent running--not necessarily the miles--is probably what you should aim for, and it'll be easier on your lower extremities as well. Keep it up.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 2:02:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By TeuffelHunden1775:
Shin splints and stress fractures are two diferent things. To this day, the medial aspects of my tibia's feel like a washboard from the calcium build-up and is still tender to the touch, (after ten years).

Run your fingers down the edge of the bone just in front of your calf muscle. If that causes pain, it's prbably stress fractures. Shin splints typically cause pain to the anterior (front) and lateral (outside) of the lower leg and is muscular in nature.

Hope this helps. My advice...swim!

Semper Fi!



This is fascinating information. I've never been a runner and have never really been comfortable walking. College was the first time I ever had to walk any distance and I had severe lower leg problems to the point that I couldn't walk across campus without excruciating pain in my lower legs.

Your description of your "shin bones" fits me perfectly. Lots of "knobs" and actually hurts to put any pressure on it. I never thought of this being a result of stress fractures.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:29:11 PM EST

Originally Posted By corwin1968:

Originally Posted By TeuffelHunden1775:
Shin splints and stress fractures are two diferent things. To this day, the medial aspects of my tibia's feel like a washboard from the calcium build-up and is still tender to the touch, (after ten years).

Run your fingers down the edge of the bone just in front of your calf muscle. If that causes pain, it's prbably stress fractures. Shin splints typically cause pain to the anterior (front) and lateral (outside) of the lower leg and is muscular in nature.

Hope this helps. My advice...swim!

Semper Fi!



This is fascinating information. I've never been a runner and have never really been comfortable walking. College was the first time I ever had to walk any distance and I had severe lower leg problems to the point that I couldn't walk across campus without excruciating pain in my lower legs.

Your description of your "shin bones" fits me perfectly. Lots of "knobs" and actually hurts to put any pressure on it. I never thought of this being a result of stress fractures.



Eh, I don't think so. Mine hurts right in front of the calf muscle and I'm 99.999% sure it's NOT stress fractures (not bad enough). I'd check to see if there were bumps there...but it'd hurt too much.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:55:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By Sniper_Wolfe:

Originally Posted By corwin1968:

Originally Posted By TeuffelHunden1775:
Shin splints and stress fractures are two diferent things. To this day, the medial aspects of my tibia's feel like a washboard from the calcium build-up and is still tender to the touch, (after ten years).

Run your fingers down the edge of the bone just in front of your calf muscle. If that causes pain, it's prbably stress fractures. Shin splints typically cause pain to the anterior (front) and lateral (outside) of the lower leg and is muscular in nature.

Hope this helps. My advice...swim!

Semper Fi!



This is fascinating information. I've never been a runner and have never really been comfortable walking. College was the first time I ever had to walk any distance and I had severe lower leg problems to the point that I couldn't walk across campus without excruciating pain in my lower legs.

Your description of your "shin bones" fits me perfectly. Lots of "knobs" and actually hurts to put any pressure on it. I never thought of this being a result of stress fractures.



Eh, I don't think so. Mine hurts right in front of the calf muscle and I'm 99.999% sure it's NOT stress fractures (not bad enough). I'd check to see if there were bumps there...but it'd hurt too much.



I had always considered the bumps and tenderness to be normal but this post got me to wondering about it.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 12:45:00 AM EST
Just a thought, if you live anywhere near the beach you might try running in the sand as a change of pace. Maybe once a week or so, just be careful as it will kill your calves and you will want to cut you distance in half at least. The sand is a great work out for runners because of the shifting surface and balance issues it is also a killer cardio work out.
Top Top