Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 9/20/2004 3:00:03 PM EST
256, 16, 4, 2, then what?

i see that 2x2=4, 4x4=16, etc,

but what times itself is 2?
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:01:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2004 5:32:38 PM EST by mikejohnson]
square root of 2, or 2^(1/2)
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:02:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By 20iner:
256, 16, 4, 2, then what?

i see that 2x2=4, 4x4=16, etc,

but what times itself is 2?



The square root of 2, approximately 1.414
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:03:07 PM EST
It's a "complex" number. (Seriously, that's the real name) Denoted as Square Root of 2, with the little Square root bar.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:05:03 PM EST
thanks
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:21:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By wolffie:
It's a "complex" number. (Seriously, that's the real name) Denoted as Square Root of 2, with the little Square root bar.



y = sqrt(x), where x is real, is by definition the positive (and thus real) number with the property that y*y = x.

Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:26:24 PM EST
Mmmk, so what do we get for helping you with your homework?
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:27:03 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2004 3:30:47 PM EST by Gunzilla]
note to self, check math before posting
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 4:10:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2004 4:12:06 PM EST by ChiefPilot]
Seems obvious to me :

256 = 2^8
16 = 2^4
4 = 2^2
2 = 2^1
1 = 2^0

But then I'm a software engineer, and we tend to think in binary anyhow. And, obviously, I work in integer math .
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 4:15:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By ChiefPilot:
Seems obvious to me :

256 = 2^8
16 = 2^4
4 = 2^2
2 = 2^1
1 = 2^0

But then I'm a software engineer, and we tend to think in binary anyhow. And, obviously, I work in integer math .



what he said!
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 4:36:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2004 4:38:47 PM EST by Mike_Mills]
wolffie,

It's not a complex number, it's an irrational number. Complex numbers contain a factor of the square root of negative one which this number does not have. An irrational number has no repeating sequence, and an infinite number of digits to define it.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 5:32:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2004 5:33:15 PM EST by mikejohnson]
but the pattern does not work...you are missing all of the binary digits 2^3, 2^5, 2^6, 2^7 of the 9 bits
Also, if you are trying to pattern the 8,4,2,1,0 then what is the pattern?
divide the exponent by 2? then explain the zero... it would be 1/2, as in the square root...



Originally Posted By ChiefPilot:
Seems obvious to me :

256 = 2^8
16 = 2^4
4 = 2^2
2 = 2^1
1 = 2^0

But then I'm a software engineer, and we tend to think in binary anyhow. And, obviously, I work in integer math .

Link Posted: 9/20/2004 6:31:50 PM EST

but the pattern does not work...you are missing all of the binary digits 2^3, 2^5, 2^6, 2^7 of the 9 bits
Also, if you are trying to pattern the 8,4,2,1,0 then what is the pattern?
divide the exponent by 2? then explain the zero... it would be 1/2, as in the square root...



Think bitshifting.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 8:20:16 PM EST

Originally Posted By ChiefPilot:

but the pattern does not work...you are missing all of the binary digits 2^3, 2^5, 2^6, 2^7 of the 9 bits
Also, if you are trying to pattern the 8,4,2,1,0 then what is the pattern?
divide the exponent by 2? then explain the zero... it would be 1/2, as in the square root...



Think bitshifting.



I considered this, but what is the pattern of the bitshift? 1, 1, 2, 4? It is not a well defined series in that sense. 1, 1, 2, 3 I would give you (Fibonacci).

Link Posted: 9/20/2004 8:22:28 PM EST
I hate math.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 8:31:30 PM EST

Originally Posted By ChiefPilot:
Seems obvious to me :

256 = 2^8
16 = 2^4
4 = 2^2
2 = 2^1
1 = 2^0

But then I'm a software engineer, and we tend to think in binary anyhow. And, obviously, I work in integer math .




thats what I was thinking, but it fell apart due to the abovementioned missing 2^3 2^5 2^6 and 2^7
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 8:55:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2004 9:03:07 PM EST by Mike_Mills]
What the heck are you guys doing here???

The formula is Xn = SQRT(Xn-1).

Written another way:

Xn = (Xn-1)^1/2

It was seeded (initialized) with a value (Xo = 65536) such that X1 = SQRT (65536) = 256.

n=1, X = 256
n=2, X = 16
n=3, X = 4
n=4, X = 2
n=5, X = SQRT(2)
n=6, X = (2)^1/4
n=7, X = (2)^1/8


n..........Xn-1............................Xn
0..................................................65536
1..............65536..............................256
2.............. 256..................................16
3..............16.....................................4
4.............. 4......................................2
5.............. 2..............................1.414213562
6.............. 1.414213562..............1.189207115
7.............. 1.189207115..............1.090507733
8.............. 1.090507733..............1.044273782
9.............. 1.044273782..............1.021897149
10............ 1.021897149..............1.010889286
11............ 1.010889286..............1.005429901
12............ 1.005429901..............1.002711275
13............ 1.002711275..............1.00135472
14............ 1.00135472..............1.000677131

Link Posted: 9/21/2004 9:47:08 AM EST
CFII,

If you hate math so much, what is your profession????

Link Posted: 9/21/2004 9:57:31 AM EST
Ooh ooh ooh, I got it!

The answer is Pi!

... as in I like pi.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 10:10:14 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 10:24:34 AM EST by brasspile]
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 11:04:35 AM EST
Not to be a smartass (better than being a dumbass, though ), but this has relevance in real life how?
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 11:09:24 AM EST
Well... if you are a programmer, you'd better know a couple of things about bitshift...

Dunno about 20iner's pattern problem though...
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 2:28:13 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 2:29:04 PM EST by brasspile]
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 2:38:47 PM EST
1 is the answer as has been explained by the others.

Would it help to know that the number that comes before 256 in that sequence is 65536 and before that would be 4294967296?
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 2:42:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By Ghost-Shooter:
Not to be a smartass (better than being a dumbass, though ), but this has relevance in real life how?



People who can spot patterns and know how to explain and predict the trends can get jobs working in air conditioned buildings. If you lived here in Arizona, you'd know exactly how relevant that was to real life.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 2:57:21 PM EST
Yep, people who don't know math tend to work for those who do. It's not always true, but is more often true than not.

Want to earn big bucks as you help your nation lead the way in technology, weaponry and economy? LEARN MATH!
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 3:54:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By qwijibo:
1 is the answer as has been explained by the others.

Would it help to know that the number that comes before 256 in that sequence is 65536 and before that would be 4294967296?



Ok, let me get this straight:

4294967296 (2^32)
65536 (2^16)
256 (2^8)
16 (2^4)
4 (2^2)
2 (2^1)
1 (2^0)

So your proposed exponents (bit positions) are 32,16,8,4,2,1,0. Or, if you wish, bit shifts of 16, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1. Sorry, that doesn't compute. 0*2 != 1.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 5:13:55 PM EST
That entire train of reasoning is wrong. The series is as I explained. The next in the series is sqrt(2).
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:06:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 6:09:37 PM EST by mikejohnson]

Originally Posted By BenDover:
Well... if you are a programmer, you'd better know a couple of things about bitshift...

Dunno about 20iner's pattern problem though...



actually, it is ANY shift with ANY base

Shifting, by the base, multiplies or divides by the base.
Example:
in base 10: 1 * 10 = 10 which is 1 shift left (2 * 10 = 20, and so on....)
and in base2 = you see above examples

here is the digit format for base2
....,2^7,2^6,2^5,2^4,2^3,2^2,2^1,2^0,2^-1,2^-2,2^-3,2^-4,....

Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:13:19 PM EST
"Please help quick, it's easy"

So, are you calling yourself a dumbass?
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:44:10 PM EST
[butthead] I'm like angry at numbers. [/butthead]
[beavis] Yeah, there's like too many of them an stuff... [/beavis]
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 7:42:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 7:42:48 PM EST by fizassist]

Originally Posted By Mike_Mills:
That entire train of reasoning is wrong. The series is as I explained. The next in the series is sqrt(2).



I know. I'm addressing the computer programmers who mumble "bitshift" and don't provide a simple recursive definition, let alone proof.
Top Top