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Posted: 10/20/2016 10:23:24 AM EDT
Can you take a pressure cooker recipe and cook it longer in a regular pot and have success?

Is the only benefit to a pressure cooker, speed?
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 11:28:20 AM EDT
I always thought pressure cookers were for canning only. Didn't realise you cooked in them too.
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 11:33:11 AM EDT
Speed and energy consumption are the two main reasons I use mine for meals.

I've read some information about nutritional and digestibility advantages, but not sure I buy into that.
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 11:59:59 AM EDT
Thanks for the replies.

Still wondering if you can cook a 'pressure cooker recipe' longer in a standard stock pot and it turn out well?

Also have an additional question: what is the optimal size pressure cooker to own? Seems like most range between 5-10 quarts.
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 12:26:50 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By R3drid3r:
Thanks for the replies.

Still wondering if you can cook a 'pressure cooker recipe' longer in a standard stock pot and it turn out well?

Also have an additional question: what is the optimal size pressure cooker to own? Seems like most range between 5-10 quarts.
View Quote




I wonder if it would be better to cook in a stainless cooker than an aluminum one...

Also, some P-C's are plug in... I saw one at a box store recently...


P-C's are quite energy efficient if that is an issue...


Link Posted: 10/20/2016 12:56:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/20/2016 12:57:18 PM EDT by 50-140]
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Originally Posted By R3drid3r:
Thanks for the replies.

Still wondering if you can cook a 'pressure cooker recipe' longer in a standard stock pot and it turn out well?

Also have an additional question: what is the optimal size pressure cooker to own? Seems like most range between 5-10 quarts.
View Quote

To your main question about taking a 'pressure cooker' meal and cooking it in more traditional methods, sure you can, you can braise a pot roast, pork roast, corned beef, brisket, in the oven for hours if you want.

Cooking has been around a lot longer than pressure cookers.

When it comes to size, I'm using a Presto 6 qt. I got from my Grandmother, it's at least 50 years old.

Now they make some nice SS pressure cookers, if I were to buy another that's what I'd be looking at. Base the size on how many people you're cooking for and what's going to fit on your stove, whether you're buying it simply for cooking or want it to dual purpose for canning.


Link Posted: 10/20/2016 2:36:21 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By 50-140:

To your main question about taking a 'pressure cooker' meal and cooking it in more traditional methods, sure you can, you can braise a pot roast, pork roast, corned beef, brisket, in the oven for hours if you want.

Cooking has been around a lot longer than pressure cookers.

When it comes to size, I'm using a Presto 6 qt. I got from my Grandmother, it's at least 50 years old.

Now they make some nice SS pressure cookers, if I were to buy another that's what I'd be looking at. Base the size on how many people you're cooking for and what's going to fit on your stove, whether you're buying it simply for cooking or want it to dual purpose for canning.


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Originally Posted By 50-140:
Originally Posted By R3drid3r:
Thanks for the replies.

Still wondering if you can cook a 'pressure cooker recipe' longer in a standard stock pot and it turn out well?

Also have an additional question: what is the optimal size pressure cooker to own? Seems like most range between 5-10 quarts.

To your main question about taking a 'pressure cooker' meal and cooking it in more traditional methods, sure you can, you can braise a pot roast, pork roast, corned beef, brisket, in the oven for hours if you want.

Cooking has been around a lot longer than pressure cookers.

When it comes to size, I'm using a Presto 6 qt. I got from my Grandmother, it's at least 50 years old.

Now they make some nice SS pressure cookers, if I were to buy another that's what I'd be looking at. Base the size on how many people you're cooking for and what's going to fit on your stove, whether you're buying it simply for cooking or want it to dual purpose for canning.




Good points! Thanks.

If I buy a large one and wish, at times, to make a smaller meal in it.... is that possible? Sorry if this is a stupid question.
Link Posted: 10/20/2016 2:50:51 PM EDT
Sure, better too big than too small. With a larger cooker, it will take a little longer to get up to pressure, but that's a minimal increase.

When you get it, read the directions, some items, rice, beans can clog up the vent, or pressure valve which can lead to over pressure and you can imagine what could happen.

As I said, mine is 50 years old, with care they can last a long time.
Link Posted: 10/21/2016 8:53:18 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By urbanredneck:
I always thought pressure cookers were for canning only. Didn't realise you cooked in them too.
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no way! we have boiled peanuts in pressure cooker (1-hour) and potatoes (15-min). we tried to mock chic-fil-a chicken.....chicken turn out great (tender), just didnt taste exactly like chicfila
Link Posted: 10/21/2016 2:10:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By R3drid3r:
Can you take a pressure cooker recipe and cook it longer in a regular pot and have success?
View Quote


Yes, in some instances. For example, the same meal of beef pot roast can be successfully prepared in a pressure cooker, baked in an oven, using a dutch oven over coals, or in a crock pot slow cooker. Dried beans can be prepared using a pressure cooker, baked in an oven, cooked in a slow cooker, over coals in a dutch oven or in a "bean hole". Results may vary and you might need to make adjustments to your recipes depending on your cooking methods.

Cooking tough meats in a pressure cooker is reputed to make them more tender.

Electric pressure cookers are now available that are easy to use: turn them on, set time and pressure, and come back when it's done.
Link Posted: 10/21/2016 2:27:07 PM EDT
Get a stove top PC. I bought one of those Instapots, I think 5 qt. You can't fill it up. You need headspace above the liquid to develop pressure, and the liquid has to boil. The electric PCs don't have the guts to heat up the liquid if the pot is more than half full. Also, a thick soup or stew doesn't really work all that well. I will get rid of the electric PC and get a stove top model.

Anything you make in a PC you can make on a stove. Remember you are cooking at higher than atmospheric, so boiling will be above 212* at MSL. I could see a real advantage to a PC, even an electric one, in the mountains.

BTW, one thing you can make in an electric PC that is fantastic is cheesecake. It's done in 10 minutes, as opposed to an hour in the oven, and an hour gradual cooling.
Link Posted: 10/21/2016 3:14:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/21/2016 3:16:48 PM EDT by zoom6zoom]
Not all pressure cookers are appropriate for canning. Many don't achieve or maintain the proper pressures and temps, or hold them long enough, to ensure safe canning of low acid foods. If you're going to can in it, make sure it's rated for it.+

http://www.livinghomegrown.com/pressure-canners-vs-pressure-cookers/
Link Posted: 10/23/2016 6:16:48 AM EDT
I would not trust an electric pressure cooker, as it is important to be able to remove it from the heat immediately sometimes and I would not think that could be done if the heat source was internal.
Link Posted: 10/23/2016 6:18:33 AM EDT
Also, mine is aluminum. I have had it for years and it works great! I use it more for making boiled peanuts, which uses a lot of salt/spices and it has held up well.
Link Posted: 10/23/2016 6:25:15 AM EDT
If you are unfamiliar with pressure cookers, it is best to go larger. If you have a smaller one and overfill, it becomes a safety hazard. If overfilled, they can explode or at minimum takes a whole lot longer for the pressure to reduce enough to take the lid off. Make sure you follow the instructions to the letter when depressurizing and removing the lid.
Link Posted: 10/23/2016 6:25:20 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Rivern:
I would not trust an electric pressure cooker, as it is important to be able to remove it from the heat immediately sometimes and I would not think that could be done if the heat source was internal.
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For what reasons? I don't see much of a difference between pulling the cord on an electric unit versus killing the stovetop other than some carry over heat from the element on a electric model. I have a large canner that I have used to do beans and other things, but it was too large for every day cooking. Recently picked up a Instapot and have been very happy with it. Throw food in, press a button or two and wait for the beep.
Link Posted: 10/23/2016 6:26:31 AM EDT
Corn on the cob and soup beans are also fantastic!
Link Posted: 10/23/2016 6:28:59 AM EDT
Need that cheesecake recipe, please
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