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Posted: 7/18/2013 7:50:58 AM EST
Yahoo article

got this in today's AIAA update, and thought about the post on here about automation.

from the article

"The human brain just isn't very well designed to monitor for an event
that very rarely happens," Key Dismukes, a top NASA human factors
scientist, said. While people "do very well" at actively controlling a
plane, "we're not well designed to monitor for a little alphanumeric
(a combination of alphabet letters and numbers) on the panel even if
that alphanumeric tells us something important," he said.
Link Posted: 7/18/2013 12:17:10 PM EST
Like reading airspeed and altitude ribbons and hearing an enunciator?
Link Posted: 7/18/2013 3:34:36 PM EST
I can see their point. I've seen a 3 person crew miss a "malfunctioning" gauge in the sim for more than a couple minutes. If an abnormal reading is not something you usually scan in your cross-check, it might get missed. Generally, I doubt airspeed or altitude would get missed that way!
Link Posted: 7/18/2013 5:36:03 PM EST
Airspeed and altitude keep you alive. If you miss those you are in the wrong career.
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 4:01:19 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By chadjetlag:
Airspeed and altitude keep you alive. If you miss those you are in the wrong career.
View Quote



Thou shalt maintain thine airspeed,
lest the ground rise and smite thee.
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 6:57:00 AM EST
I might miss fuel temprature or o2 pressure for a few min.


Airspeed, altitude, attitude, fuel burn? If you miss those then there is always barber college.
Link Posted: 7/20/2013 11:01:59 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By regalrocket:
I might miss fuel temprature or o2 pressure for a few min.


Airspeed, altitude, attitude, fuel burn? If you miss those then there is always barber collegebeing organic fertilizer.
View Quote



FIFY.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 6:36:57 AM EST
Didn't the pitot system freeze and cause alt and as gauge issues ( among other things) on the airplane in the Atlantic that stalled and crashed?
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 8:10:05 AM EST
Yes it did. At some point whilst falling 30,000 ft one would think if pulling back is not workimg, maybe we should try something different. Dependence on the automation and lack of basic stick and rudder skills helped produce that accident.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 8:20:33 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By chadjetlag:
Yes it did. At some point whilst falling 30,000 ft one would think if pulling back is not workimg, maybe we should try something different. Dependence on the automation and lack of basic stick and rudder skills helped produce that accident.
View Quote


Windows....they are for looking out.
Asses are useful for more than just sitting on........some older aviators actually used them for another sensory input.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 5:36:48 PM EST
Yeah...trusting your inner ear/seat of the pants over your instruments during night IMC flight is something most people try to avoid...
That said, I don't know why someone would continue to pull back on the controls for more than a few seconds without thinking about a stall.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:54:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2013 6:04:36 PM EST by ElSupremo]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raimius:
Yeah...trusting your inner ear/seat of the pants over your instruments during night IMC flight is something most people try to avoid...
That said, I don't know why someone would continue to pull back on the controls for more than a few seconds without thinking about a stall.
View Quote


Are you trying to cast dispersion on the tried and true "cat and duck" method of IMC operations? You young whipper - snappers....
Have you ever done "timed turns" or "magnetic compass only" instrument flight? Needle ball & oil pressure unusual attitudes.
Back course ADF circling approach?
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 11:40:57 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By raimius:
Yeah...trusting your inner ear/seat of the pants over your instruments during night IMC flight is something most people try to avoid...
That said, I don't know why someone would continue to pull back on the controls for more than a few seconds without thinking about a stall.
View Quote


Or, spend some of the time in cruise knowing what is in the abnormal checklist.
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 11:47:50 AM EST
I think the article is accurate. Just ask Captain Sum Ting Wong how hard it is to pay attention to a stupid airspeed indicator.

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