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1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 3/13/2006 6:12:49 AM EST


some of these came out so blurry , how do I correct that

yes some came out really well



I am using my new Camera z3 ..

I am thinking its the exposure? or some thing what would I do to fix that
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:14:36 AM EST

Buy a tripod.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:15:48 AM EST
Z3? brand?

it look like you have the flash setup wrong and or exposure wrong and are moving the camera. Be still. Use Auto mode. Hold the button half way down to focus then all the way down to take the snap.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:17:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By gaspain:
Z3? brand?

it look like you have the flash setup wrong and or exposure wrong and are moving the camera. Be still. Use Auto mode. Hold the button half way down to focus then all the way down to take the snap.



Konica minolta Dimage z3
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:19:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/13/2006 6:20:11 AM EST by DukeSnookems]

Originally Posted By Waldo:
Buy a tripod.



Tripod won't help when your subject is moving. You get blurry/streaked shots because your camera is holding the shutter open. It does this when it's dark and the camera needs more light. Set the ISO to a higher setting (to increase sensitivity), try and hold steady, and it should get crisper. Personally, I think streaked photos with lots of ambient light look a lot better than your typical overflashed snapshots.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:30:14 AM EST
Dont drink & shoot.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:35:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/13/2006 6:36:10 AM EST by hanau]


it is the demons causing this.
since you are in Satan's territory!
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:53:53 AM EST
The lower the light level, the more difficult it is for the autofocus to work properly. Some cameras are notoriously bad with this, but it is a problem for all. You may think there was plenty of light, but no indoor scene, especially a bar, is the same as bright sunlight. I'm sure the flash worked?

In the first pic I suspect the camera focused on the wall/doorframe between, and behind, the subjects. Therefore, subjects not in best possible focus.

The biggest problem seems to be a second or "ghost" image. Not sure what happened, maybe the flash reflecting off the mirror?
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 6:57:42 AM EST
read the manual and learn to change your settings
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:03:26 AM EST
The problem is easy to diagnose:

In the first picture (blurry) someone is dinking a coors. In the second picture (clear) there is no coors to be seen.

Clearly, your camera is afraid of crappy beer. Keep coors away from your camera and all your pictures should turn out alright.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:06:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/13/2006 7:08:31 AM EST by -brass-]
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:17:50 AM EST

Originally Posted By -brass-:
Bad pic is a dirty lens. + too slow of shutter speed to match flash (hence the "ghosting")

2nd curtain flash trigger, but what you are snapping pix of shouldn't need that.


--ETA: Was your finger over one of the many small sensors on the front of the camera body? That would make it think it was much darker than it really was (fingers are dark)




No hand over sensor , could my camera be faulty
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:21:07 AM EST
The picture came out that way because there wasn't enough ambient light for the ISO setting you were using. Manually change to a higher ISO setting. The picture will be grainier, but you can avoid some of the blur from the shutter being open too long. If you want the best low light picture taking ability with a digital camera, you've got to have a digital SLR.

If changing the ISO setting doesn't give you the pictures you want and you don't mind the bright washed-out look with dark shadows in the background, then just use the flash.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:27:50 AM EST
on high magnification its very easy to disturb the camera while snappiong a pic....
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:29:40 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:35:57 AM EST
Well my camera wasnt exactly a cheapy point and shoot camera.
So its sounds like I just have to learn how to use the settings

konicaminolta.com/products/consumer/digital_camera/dimage/dimage-z3/


Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:39:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:56:47 AM EST
Welcome to the Photography & Photoshopping . Enjoy your stay.

Digicam in GD =

Digicam in Photography forum =
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:56:56 AM EST
You took it at 0.6 sec, f/2.8 and ISO 200. You need to make the iso higher.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 7:59:30 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 9:37:58 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:07:32 PM EST

Originally Posted By Zhukov:

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:
You took it at 0.6 sec, f/2.8 and ISO 200. You need to make the iso higher.



Even if he bumped it to IS0400, it would not have reduced the exposure time from 0.6seconds to something TEN times faster.



That's what 3200 is for.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:24:42 PM EST
I have a Z3, and it does not have a low-light IR illuminator for focusing in low light. That's the only feature I find lacking. That will reduce overall low-light focusing performance. The solution to the subject ghosting is getting down the shutter time (use flash, raise ISO, etc).
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:48:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By Zhukov:

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:
You took it at 0.6 sec, f/2.8 and ISO 200. You need to make the iso higher.



Even if he bumped it to IS0400, it would not have reduced the exposure time from 0.6seconds to something TEN times faster.



I would then say use the flash, but the ISO will at least give him a better chance. He did get an ok result on the second one with 1/13.
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