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Posted: 4/18/2006 5:11:51 PM EST


my g/f called a bit ago and told me someone used her identity, or something of the sort to move $1,800 from her account to a different bank account... i just about shit when she told me this... shes such a nice girl, never done anything wrong, doesnt hang out with any shit head people... and someone goes and does some shit like this. i was fucking pissed...

but... shes been talking with her bank-

seems who ever did this, set up an account at "Wells Fargo" bank to move the $1,800 into. She had the money removed from her account at the same bank.........

she will be getting all the money back into her account and the bank is going to investigate...

im very happy for her because she works 11 hour days, and saves her money well... im glad she got it back.

i wish ALL the people who get cheated out of their money could get it back...
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 5:21:10 PM EST
you have a 99% chance to not have your identity compromised if you participate in any online transactions..let her know.

glad to here she is getting her money back!
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 5:38:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By dsg2003gt:
you have a 99% chance to not have your identity compromised if you participate in any online transactions..let her know.

glad to here she is getting her money back!



And that %'age only goes up if you shop at the right places (buy from large/reputable resellers [amazon, newegg...] or pay via a secure service like PayPal [yes, I know we hate it, but it IS reliable!]).
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 5:40:06 PM EST
Buy a cross cutting paper shredder and don't trust corportations with personal info. *shrug*
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 5:55:31 PM EST
Good info on identify theft here:

clarkhoward.com/shownotes/category/6/162/


I'd have her review it. I'm guessing that she is going to have more to do more than just this issue. Identify theft has a way of constantly popping back up.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 6:11:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By Andreuha:

Originally Posted By dsg2003gt:
you have a 99% chance to not have your identity compromised if you participate in any online transactions..let her know.

glad to here she is getting her money back!



And that %'age only goes up if you shop at the right places (buy from large/reputable resellers [amazon, newegg...] or pay via a secure service like PayPal [yes, I know we hate it, but it IS reliable!]).



Paypal secure? Yeah...up to the point you get hit. About two years ago I got an email that my paypal address had been changed. Found I couldn't log into my account anymore, and called them up (which was a bitch and a half to get a live person back then)....turns out someone got into my account and had made several purchases on there. Two days of going back and forth with paypal and my bank managed to save me from losing a few hundred bucks, but no way in hell do I think they are all that secure. Considering I used the account only frequently, and didn't have an easy to guess password at all (used bangs, numbers, letters, and an ampersand, about 12 characters long).

No one got it from me, so my guess is that most likely someone got the password from the occasional 'hacks' of paypals servers....
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 6:18:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By hard-case:

Paypal secure? Yeah...up to the point you get hit. About two years ago I got an email that my paypal address had been changed. Found I couldn't log into my account anymore, and called them up (which was a bitch and a half to get a live person back then)....turns out someone got into my account and had made several purchases on there. Two days of going back and forth with paypal and my bank managed to save me from losing a few hundred bucks, but no way in hell do I think they are all that secure. Considering I used the account only frequently, and didn't have an easy to guess password at all (used bangs, numbers, letters, and an ampersand, about 12 characters long).

No one got it from me, so my guess is that most likely someone got the password from the occasional 'hacks' of paypals servers....



No offense, but you probably gave that password away in a prior phishing attempt and didn't even realize it. Heck, an email like that notifying you of an address change might actually be THE phishing attempt! Did you click the Paypal link inside the email notification?

Link Posted: 4/18/2006 6:43:19 PM EST
My wife had this happen to her about 10 years ago.

They kept all of their time cards at work in a rack on the wall. On their cards were....you guessed it, their fucking SSNs!

Anyhow we found out when we bought a vehicle that she had a credit problem. We have never even bounced a check. Not one in 26years and our credit is otherwise impeccable(I got a 3.8% rate on my last mortgage). Searched into it and there were 2 maxed out and unpaid CCs. No one would help, no one would look into it, no one would do shit. My wife spent days on the phone tracking it all down and found out it was her coworker. The info would have taken one phone call from anyone in LE but no one would give her any info. Seems the thief had more rights and protection than we did.

We got it all cleared up. DA wouldn't press charges even though my wife wanted to. As long as she paid them off no one cared. In all likelihood she did the same to someone else in order to pay those off. A search on the state court site revealed numerous credit problems and issues.

DA did offer to arrest my wife though for swearing over the phone!

Funny thing was, this bitch tried to insert herself into our lives telling my wife she was her best friend, blah, blah, blah. My wife worked at the medical college I went to and their office was right by the wieght room there so I would pop in. She used to come out and hit on me. I told my wife not to trust her and not to let her into our lives. She got the drift eventually or it could have been far worse. I never did tell her the bitch was hitting on me though. It would have probably resulted in her getting fired and there was no way I was hosing anyone else especially a backstabbing skank like her.

She has something placed on her credit now where no one can take out a CC on her name without first contacting her. We are careful in how we handle our bank accounts also. No ATM or debit cards. I do some internet transactions and haven't had any problems with those thus far but have had to get on my CC company from time to time about just increasing our credit line without telling us. I keep a low limit. I only need them for short term as we NEVER carry a balance.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 7:03:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By tctlrld:
No offense, but you probably gave that password away in a prior phishing attempt and didn't even realize it. Heck, an email like that notifying you of an address change might actually be THE phishing attempt! Did you click the Paypal link inside the email notification?




None taken. Espeically considering I get a ton of those paypal phishing scam emails (way more now that I don't have a paypal account anymore), I have an idea of how nasty they can be. Hell I get a kick reading the plain text email (don't let my email client interpret/run anything to see all the wierd address they try to pass off! 95% of that kind of email gets spam filtered/deleted though, and of the others, I NEVER click on links from email. I got the email saying that my account was modded (didn't ask for verification, just said hey, your account has been changed, if this is incorrect check it out), So just opened a new browser window, hit up www.paypal.com, and it wouldn't let me in. Located the number to call, and spent about 30 minutes on the phone, where they verified that there was a change, and that two charges were made the night before totalling about 300 bucks.

Honestly, I can't really fault paypal. I mean, their system did 'work'....they notified me of the breach, and were able to clear it up relatively quickly (total of about three days with 2 calls to the bank and 3 to paypal). Just left a very sour taste in my mouth, as I've never had any trouble online before or since (knock on wood).
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 8:41:26 PM EST
the g/f says the only thing she pays online is her car payment...

the deal may have been- done through a check... not quite sure yet
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 8:44:15 PM EST
Sorry,i needed some AR parts.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 8:46:02 PM EST
What's worse is most of the criminals are never prosecuted.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 8:52:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
Sorry,i needed some AR parts.



lol-

my buddy was online when he told him, he replied "sorry, i needed blow"

yep... cheap hookers and crappy blow is an expensive hobby"
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 9:12:07 PM EST
first of all, you need to password protect ALL accounts. call the bank and tell them you want passwords on your accounts. from now on, anyone trying to access an account will need a password - anyone with your personal info can call the bank and pretend to be you.

and check ou these links. you'll want to put out a fraud alert and contact the FTC. get a police report as well... it will be helpful if anyone tries to fuck you again. and it would be a good idea to cancel all cards and have new ones issued... you don't know what other info the thieves have.

www.econsumer.equifax.com/consumer/sitepage.ehtml?forward=elearning_idtheft3

www.experian.com/consumer/cac/InvalidateSession.do?code=SECURITYALERT
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