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Posted: 7/5/2012 5:36:47 AM EDT
Is is common practice for people to put a diagram of a mildot reticle on the inside of a flip up scope cap showing areas on the reticle to use for holdover at various ranges?

I saw photos of a rifle someone had done this on recently and it didn't sound like a bad idea

I suppose it might not work the same on all magnifications though
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 5:38:04 AM EDT
[#1]
I have this on my SPR, on the inside of my flip cap.

I have windage and bullet drop yardage estimates.
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 5:38:23 AM EDT
[#2]
I print off a chart telling me how many MILs (in mils and tenths) to hold off at various ranges. I tape it to the comb of an AR, or the eyepiece of a riflescope....anywhere it's easily accessible in a hurry.

Link Posted: 7/5/2012 5:39:13 AM EDT
[#3]
Does a mil-dot allow more precise range estimation than plain old eyeball, or does the dot system come into play after you have a range?
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 5:41:12 AM EDT
[#4]
Quoted:
Does a mil-dot allow more precise range estimation than plain old eyeball, or does the dot system come into play after you have a range?


After you have a range, usually, but after you've got enough time behind a gun, you can just roll with it.

FWIW, I like to dial elevation and hold for wind.
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 5:42:37 AM EDT
[#5]
Quoted:
Does a mil-dot allow more precise range estimation than plain old eyeball, or does the dot system come into play after you have a range?


If used properly it allows one to very precisely range a target at an unknown distance. I'm not versed on how one does it (I don't have any optics, much less one with ranging reticles) but I know it works.
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 5:46:01 AM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Does a mil-dot allow more precise range estimation than plain old eyeball, or does the dot system come into play after you have a range?


If used properly it allows one to very precisely range a target at an unknown distance. I'm not versed on how one does it (I don't have any optics, much less one with ranging reticles) but I know it works.


There's a great little flash game for an intro to mildot usage at longer range.

I found that it was easier to open up an excel spreadsheet in a separate window and set up some formulas for calculations.

http://www.shooterready.com/lrsdemo.html
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 5:46:24 AM EDT
[#7]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Does a mil-dot allow more precise range estimation than plain old eyeball, or does the dot system come into play after you have a range?


If used properly it allows one to very precisely range a target at an unknown distance. I'm not versed on how one does it (I don't have any optics, much less one with ranging reticles) but I know it works.


Height of target in meters x 1000 / target height in mils
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 6:02:29 AM EDT
[#8]
I just discovered something I must have while looking at mil dot links on google...

anyone use the mil dot master?  looks amazing.
basically a sliderule that does mil dot math!
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 6:04:34 AM EDT
[#9]
A friend showed me a downloadable Ap for his smart phone that would tell you more than you wanted to know about windage, drop, etc.  
Almost made me want to go out and get a smart phone....but not quite.    

Notes in the lens cap protector sounds like a good application for me.

I also have the mildot master slide rule.  It is a handy tool for target shooting, or practicing with the www.shooterready.com computer game.

Some variable magnification scopes do not tell you what magnification is correct for mildotting.  I think the standard is 10X, but to be sure you can set up a measuring pole marked off in feet at a known distance (say 150 ft. or 300 ft) and backcheck for the correct mag setting on the scope.  Mark it indelible on the magnification ring.
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 6:35:37 AM EDT
[#10]
Quoted:
I just discovered something I must have while looking at mil dot links on google...

anyone use the mil dot master?  looks amazing.
basically a sliderule that does mil dot math!


Yes, it is,and it does it very well.

Link Posted: 7/5/2012 6:40:41 AM EDT
[#11]
I keep  laminated 4"X5" sheets with mil rads from 100 to 1200 in 50yd increments taped to my stock.



I have 4 which cover the different weight bullets I use.  They are also in my log book which contains a mildot master.




Taped to the inside of my rear lens cap is a picture of the U.S. Optics "mil gap" reticle I have for reference.







Link Posted: 7/5/2012 6:50:00 AM EDT
[#12]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Does a mil-dot allow more precise range estimation than plain old eyeball, or does the dot system come into play after you have a range?


If used properly it allows one to very precisely range a target at an unknown distance. I'm not versed on how one does it (I don't have any optics, much less one with ranging reticles) but I know it works.


Height of target in meters x 1000 / target height in mils


Except that anything I measure in a reticle measures better in inches.  Also, using mil relation is reasonably accurate depending on conditions, range and the size of the target, but I would never qualfy it as precise.

(Size of Target in Inches x 25.4)/ Size of Target in Mils = Range in Meters

(Size of Target in Inches x 27.77)/ Size of Target in Mils = Range in Yards
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 6:55:23 AM EDT
[#13]
Quoted:
Is is common practice for people to put a diagram of a mildot reticle on the inside of a flip up scope cap showing areas on the reticle to use for holdover at various ranges?

I saw photos of a rifle someone had done this on recently and it didn't sound like a bad idea


It's pretty common and I use the occular scope cap, myself, though mine just got washed out recently and it was laminated.  


I suppose it might not work the same on all magnifications though


It will only be correct if your optic is front focal.  For second focal variables the reticle will be correct at only one power setting.
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 7:00:25 AM EDT
[#14]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Does a mil-dot allow more precise range estimation than plain old eyeball, or does the dot system come into play after you have a range?


After you have a range, usually, but after you've got enough time behind a gun, you can just roll with it.

FWIW, I like to dial elevation and hold for wind.


As do I.  To expand on Zia's point, the mil hold-overs/unders are for expedient use, much like anatomy holds.  Using that technique one can leave an optic set with 300 or 500 y/m data and simply hold high or low to quiclky account for range.  The downside is that when you have to start holding for windage you are floating the target out in space instead of haveing a precise sight picture, but it can still be very useful.
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 2:06:54 PM EDT
[#15]
Quoted:


Some variable magnification scopes do not tell you what magnification is correct for mildotting.  I think the standard is 10X, but to be sure you can set up a measuring pole marked off in feet at a known distance (say 150 ft. or 300 ft) and backcheck for the correct mag setting on the scope.  Mark it indelible on the magnification ring.


FWIW, I have one scope that goes to 16x and I prefer to use 16x for anything over 100-yard shots, so I just recalculated my holdovers using a a factor of 10/16, which works out to roughly 22.5" per 1000 yards instead of 3' per 1000 per 'mil' graduation. Having a first focal plane reticle and mil/mil adjustments and reticle is certainly faster, but for target work, SFP reticles and MOA adjustments with MIL reticle is fine. You just have to learn to do math, which is generally a good thing for the average American.
Link Posted: 7/5/2012 4:12:30 PM EDT
[#16]
Quoted:
Quoted:


Some variable magnification scopes do not tell you what magnification is correct for mildotting.  I think the standard is 10X, but to be sure you can set up a measuring pole marked off in feet at a known distance (say 150 ft. or 300 ft) and backcheck for the correct mag setting on the scope.  Mark it indelible on the magnification ring.


FWIW, I have one scope that goes to 16x and I prefer to use 16x for anything over 100-yard shots, so I just recalculated my holdovers using a a factor of 10/16, which works out to roughly 22.5" per 1000 yards instead of 3' per 1000 per 'mil' graduation. Having a first focal plane reticle and mil/mil adjustments and reticle is certainly faster, but for target work, SFP reticles and MOA adjustments with MIL reticle is fine. You just have to learn to do math, which is generally a good thing for the average American.


This is certainly a technique that will work and it really is just a little basic math.  For the majority of shooters, for the majority of the time, it is good to go.  For some folks it is less than ideal and if the option to use a FFP optic exists then it is worth its weight in gold.  While that bit of math may not be incredibly difficult, it adds another moving part to the process and increases the opportunity for failure and as with many things, the LR and precision game is one of mistakes.  The fewer you make the more you accomplish.  It also increases the amount of time one potentially requires to calculate for engagements.  Time isn't much of an issue from the bench and if you have time to fill out a range card in any detail it may be mostly a moot point, but FFP is definitely a nice thing to have.

Again, for most folks this is more a matter of convenience.  However, it decreases the margin for error with others.  A couple examples are when increasing field of view by using reduced power for using over/under mil holds in rapid engagements on different targets at close to intermediate range and for improved target detection, especially with moving targets.  In these cases true mil holds are faster and more reliable and guesswork or additional calculations aren't desirable.  Then there's always the accuracy of the trigger nut and the effect of Murphy when setting magnification.  This is less of an issue day to day, but in tactical scenarios and matches it can be a detriment, and in even less common occasions it is helpful during low light conditions to not need to know exactly what magnification one has dialed in, especially when using a lower magnification in conjunction with night vision.   Just something to think about.
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