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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/16/2005 11:47:27 AM EDT
Anyone ever train in kajukenbo?

It is available near me and looks interesting, but wonder if anyone has any first hand experience?

Looking at it for a first selfdefense/martial arts training for myself and probably the kids.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 6:37:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/18/2005 6:40:03 AM EDT by DevL]
Its an excellent martial ART and better than normal McDojo stuff. Its not a true state of the art mixed martial art like they would have you believe. The stand up striking and defense is classic Kung Fu/Karate which means its crap. Top 3 choices for self defense are

1. American Boxing
2. Muay Thai Kickboxing
3. Brazilian Juijitsu

Taken in that order due to importance. Not many places for kids to box. Many MT gyms are too hardcore for children. BJJ is everywhere and they all have childrens classes.

If you want a hobby and to help build self esteem for your kids then Kajukenbo will be great for that. You want to learn to fight and to kick the shit out of people? Pass and go for the meat and potatoes.
Link Posted: 8/23/2005 11:32:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/24/2005 12:10:13 AM EDT by clubsoda22]
Realize, most importantly, we're not talking about self defense, but fighting. I don't consider any fighting instruction without a detailed use-of-force lesson to be a legitimate for self defense. Anyone can teach you how to fight well. But attention must be paid to the fact that various techniques will be viewed differently in court and you really haven't defended yourself if you kill someone with the "five point palm exploding heart technique" and end up as someones bitch for 7 years on manslaughter charges.

If you're looking for effective street fighting skills, you probably don't want to go just with Boxing or BJJ (depending on who's teaching the BJJ). Boxing teaches you to punch hard, but you're gonna need someone to work with you on kicks and clinch fighting (the kind of stuff that tends to f-up boxers). a lot of BJJ places focus nearly totally on groundfighting. This stuff is way overrated for actual street usage.

A lot of places teach both BJJ and MT. concentrate mainly on your stand up game and keep the ground stuff related to how to stand back up. For the adult classes, make sure the instructors are gonna teach you how to fight dirty, and not just prepare you for an octogon battle.

There's sport MMA and Street MMA. You want to concentrate on the latter. For an example of the latter, look at some of Bas Rutten's work (interestingly enough, he recommends krav maga as a good base for street MMA)

I think a good street MMA program will consist of MT & boxing (for your primary stand up game), BJJ (for getting yourself off the ground) and philipino martial arts (for stick and knife defense)

To get decent fighting skills fast, combatives are the way to go. Krav Maga, Fight Survival Training (FIST). Each of those programs takes about 6 months to master compared to a MMA program which can take years. Combatives is the basics, Martial arts is a PhD.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 8:56:52 AM EDT
What is the difference in street MMA and sport MMA? What techniques differ? I hear this occasionally and fail to see the difference. Any dumbass can learn eye gouges, fishhooks, small joint manmipulations and biting in about 5 minutes.
Link Posted: 8/24/2005 9:14:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DevL:
What is the difference in street MMA and sport MMA? What techniques differ? I hear this occasionally and fail to see the difference. Any dumbass can learn eye gouges, fishhooks, small joint manmipulations and biting in about 5 minutes.



Aside from adding all the dirty fighting, what seperates sport MMA from street MMA is the greater concentration on multiple opponents (less emphasis on the ground game) and a greater awareness of the fact that opponents will possibly be armed (the addition of filipino martial arts)
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