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Posted: 4/18/2016 11:54:31 PM EDT
I want to buy a 2500 HD Denali...but if they are going to update that thing I'll wait,  if not I'll get a Dodge Brodozer 3500
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 12:00:32 AM EDT
[#1]
They tell me there is an all new fuel system coming for the '17 model year. Should come with a pretty good power increase
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 12:08:51 AM EDT
[#2]
Heard  rumors about a new turbo from a different manufacturer but thats it, wonder if the truck will get a facelift like the 1500 Denali.

 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 12:14:55 AM EDT
[#3]
I was talking to an engineer and he was telling me about the new fuel system, wouldn't spill the beans on anything else though.
I'm sure if they turn it up it will have a different turbocharger also.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:15:20 AM EDT
[#4]
2017 will have a different turbo - no idea what the other changes will be.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 12:57:26 PM EDT
[#5]
The only reason to change the charger is to support more power.   The Dmax won't fall behind, GM is still selling the shit out of them and GM knows the power wars are what sells trucks.  The Dmax of 2016 is less different from the original than the other 2 engines, it's a solid design....and people say "it's an Isuzu" like that's bad hahaha.



The original Dmax could support 500 horse (at the tire) with stock engine parts and be reliable, emissions would be the only thing preventing the dmax from making a nickle today.  Emissions and turbos go hand in hand.   Run them hot enough to burn the soot and you just have to kill the Nox with SCR and DEF....gotta do that anyway.  VGT's and pilot injection really help an engine make power cleanly these days, but the kitty pee and filters are here to stay.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:35:11 PM EDT
[#6]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
The only reason to change the charger is to support more power.   The Dmax won't fall behind, GM is still selling the shit out of them and GM knows the power wars are what sells trucks.  The Dmax of 2016 is less different from the original than the other 2 engines, it's a solid design....and people say "it's an Isuzu" like that's bad hahaha.

The original Dmax could support 500 horse (at the tire) with stock engine parts and be reliable, emissions would be the only thing preventing the dmax from making a nickle today.  Emissions and turbos go hand in hand.   Run them hot enough to burn the soot and you just have to kill the Nox with SCR and DEF....gotta do that anyway.  VGT's and pilot injection really help an engine make power cleanly these days, but the kitty pee and filters are here to stay.
View Quote


Not always true.  Reducing component cost (read turbo) is a driver more often than not.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:47:24 PM EDT
[#7]
Quoted:
I want to buy a 2500 HD Denali...but if they are going to update that thing I'll wait,  if not I'll get a Dodge Brodozer 3500
View Quote


Neighbor just bought a 3500 Cummins 6.7  He's hauling a huge camper.  He said the torque is insane.  
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 11:58:58 PM EDT
[#8]
They shouldn't do anything but beef the trans and brakes further. The truck is already no slouch despite being 200ftlbs down from the ford offerings.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 1:38:05 AM EDT
[#9]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
They shouldn't do anything but beef the trans and brakes further. The truck is already no slouch despite being 200ftlbs down from the ford offerings.
View Quote


We can tell how much pull you have with DMax & GM
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 2:18:50 AM EDT
[#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


We can tell how much pull you have with DMax & GM
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
They shouldn't do anything but beef the trans and brakes further. The truck is already no slouch despite being 200ftlbs down from the ford offerings.


We can tell how much pull you have with DMax & GM


It's between zilch and nada, to be specific.  Apparently buying lots of used GM pickups doesn't get you on the board of directors, who knew?

The industry is gravitating away from 100% duty cycle capable engines and adding more complexity, this nets more power, but reduces capacity.  The early Duramax, 6BT, and 7.3 PSD are all just as complex as they needed to be.  Thanks to emissions and the ever-evolving horsepower war, which are at odds with each other, we get more "civilized" diesels that fail to perform at the same levels, as far as duty cycle is concerned, then their senior counterparts.

There's always a sweet spot, and I think that LDDs have passed theirs, and largely due to emissions and efficiency/fleet standards.

Link Posted: 4/20/2016 8:21:50 AM EDT
[#11]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
It's between zilch and nada, to be specific.  Apparently buying lots of used GM pickups doesn't get you on the board of directors, who knew?



The industry is gravitating away from 100% duty cycle capable engines and adding more complexity, this nets more power, but reduces capacity.  The early Duramax, 6BT, and 7.3 PSD are all just as complex as they needed to be.  Thanks to emissions and the ever-evolving horsepower war, which are at odds with each other, we get more "civilized" diesels that fail to perform at the same levels, as far as duty cycle is concerned, then their senior counterparts.



There's always a sweet spot, and I think that LDDs have passed theirs, and largely due to emissions and efficiency/fleet standards.



View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

They shouldn't do anything but beef the trans and brakes further. The truck is already no slouch despite being 200ftlbs down from the ford offerings.




We can tell how much pull you have with DMax & GM





It's between zilch and nada, to be specific.  Apparently buying lots of used GM pickups doesn't get you on the board of directors, who knew?



The industry is gravitating away from 100% duty cycle capable engines and adding more complexity, this nets more power, but reduces capacity.  The early Duramax, 6BT, and 7.3 PSD are all just as complex as they needed to be.  Thanks to emissions and the ever-evolving horsepower war, which are at odds with each other, we get more "civilized" diesels that fail to perform at the same levels, as far as duty cycle is concerned, then their senior counterparts.



There's always a sweet spot, and I think that LDDs have passed theirs, and largely due to emissions and efficiency/fleet standards.



Nah, it's just the adoption of new tech in the form of emission equipment that causes reliability and "capacity" issues.  As someone that studies the details of GM engines for work I can tell you that the engineering changes have done nothing but added to the capacity.

 
The emissions tech has been refined as well, GM used to provide the needed excess fuel to the particulate filter regeneration via multiple injection events late in the cycle. This caused lots of fuel consumption and fuel dilution of the engine oil. Now they placed a separate injector in the exhaust system to provide fuel directly. Piezo electric injectors..internally balanced cranks..higher ratio counts in the trans... Improvements will continue. I still drive a tuned LB7 with 260k on it but the new trucks are far more capable.  If they ran loaded with 20k at highway speeds uphill they would be happier and live longer than the high heat cycle life that most of them live.  




I believe the VGT on the duramax has been largely unchanged since 2004.5.  The part number may have changed but the inducer size has been consistent i think. It's an airflow issue, I'd bet money it's getting larger.




Ldd are now producing power and torque that was once only found in rigs. Everyone now sells a light duty truck that could require a CDL licence to operate at rated capacity....that's nutty.  The allison 1000 is the same trans as the allison 2400 that was meant for transit busses and dump trucks. They just changed the ratios.   They have gotten more complex due to emissions but since the adoption of common rail direct injection they haven't been simple by any means.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 10:10:43 AM EDT
[#12]
Id suspect they will up the power.  Even though it has less than the ford n ram its still an awesome hauling beast.
Link Posted: 4/20/2016 11:40:49 PM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Nah, it's just the adoption of new tech in the form of emission equipment that causes reliability and "capacity" issues.  As someone that studies the details of GM engines for work I can tell you that the engineering changes have done nothing but added to the capacity.    The emissions tech has been refined as well, GM used to provide the needed excess fuel to the particulate filter regeneration via multiple injection events late in the cycle. This caused lots of fuel consumption and fuel dilution of the engine oil. Now they placed a separate injector in the exhaust system to provide fuel directly. Piezo electric injectors..internally balanced cranks..higher ratio counts in the trans... Improvements will continue. I still drive a tuned LB7 with 260k on it but the new trucks are far more capable.  If they ran loaded with 20k at highway speeds uphill they would be happier and live longer than the high heat cycle life that most of them live.  


I believe the VGT on the duramax has been largely unchanged since 2004.5.  The part number may have changed but the inducer size has been consistent i think. It's an airflow issue, I'd bet money it's getting larger.


Ldd are now producing power and torque that was once only found in rigs. Everyone now sells a light duty truck that could require a CDL licence to operate at rated capacity....that's nutty.  The allison 1000 is the same trans as the allison 2400 that was meant for transit busses and dump trucks. They just changed the ratios.   They have gotten more complex due to emissions but since the adoption of common rail direct injection they haven't been simple by any means.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
They shouldn't do anything but beef the trans and brakes further. The truck is already no slouch despite being 200ftlbs down from the ford offerings.


We can tell how much pull you have with DMax & GM


It's between zilch and nada, to be specific.  Apparently buying lots of used GM pickups doesn't get you on the board of directors, who knew?

The industry is gravitating away from 100% duty cycle capable engines and adding more complexity, this nets more power, but reduces capacity.  The early Duramax, 6BT, and 7.3 PSD are all just as complex as they needed to be.  Thanks to emissions and the ever-evolving horsepower war, which are at odds with each other, we get more "civilized" diesels that fail to perform at the same levels, as far as duty cycle is concerned, then their senior counterparts.

There's always a sweet spot, and I think that LDDs have passed theirs, and largely due to emissions and efficiency/fleet standards.

Nah, it's just the adoption of new tech in the form of emission equipment that causes reliability and "capacity" issues.  As someone that studies the details of GM engines for work I can tell you that the engineering changes have done nothing but added to the capacity.    The emissions tech has been refined as well, GM used to provide the needed excess fuel to the particulate filter regeneration via multiple injection events late in the cycle. This caused lots of fuel consumption and fuel dilution of the engine oil. Now they placed a separate injector in the exhaust system to provide fuel directly. Piezo electric injectors..internally balanced cranks..higher ratio counts in the trans... Improvements will continue. I still drive a tuned LB7 with 260k on it but the new trucks are far more capable.  If they ran loaded with 20k at highway speeds uphill they would be happier and live longer than the high heat cycle life that most of them live.  


I believe the VGT on the duramax has been largely unchanged since 2004.5.  The part number may have changed but the inducer size has been consistent i think. It's an airflow issue, I'd bet money it's getting larger.


Ldd are now producing power and torque that was once only found in rigs. Everyone now sells a light duty truck that could require a CDL licence to operate at rated capacity....that's nutty.  The allison 1000 is the same trans as the allison 2400 that was meant for transit busses and dump trucks. They just changed the ratios.   They have gotten more complex due to emissions but since the adoption of common rail direct injection they haven't been simple by any means.

Piezo injectors are going away, they are going back to solenoid injectors. Also I believe denso will making the fuel system now instead of Bosch
Link Posted: 4/21/2016 12:37:48 AM EDT
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Nah, it's just the adoption of new tech in the form of emission equipment that causes reliability and "capacity" issues.  As someone that studies the details of GM engines for work I can tell you that the engineering changes have done nothing but added to the capacity.    The emissions tech has been refined as well, GM used to provide the needed excess fuel to the particulate filter regeneration via multiple injection events late in the cycle. This caused lots of fuel consumption and fuel dilution of the engine oil. Now they placed a separate injector in the exhaust system to provide fuel directly. Piezo electric injectors..internally balanced cranks..higher ratio counts in the trans... Improvements will continue. I still drive a tuned LB7 with 260k on it but the new trucks are far more capable.  If they ran loaded with 20k at highway speeds uphill they would be happier and live longer than the high heat cycle life that most of them live.  


I believe the VGT on the duramax has been largely unchanged since 2004.5.  The part number may have changed but the inducer size has been consistent i think. It's an airflow issue, I'd bet money it's getting larger.


Ldd are now producing power and torque that was once only found in rigs. Everyone now sells a light duty truck that could require a CDL licence to operate at rated capacity....that's nutty.  The allison 1000 is the same trans as the allison 2400 that was meant for transit busses and dump trucks. They just changed the ratios.   They have gotten more complex due to emissions but since the adoption of common rail direct injection they haven't been simple by any means.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
They shouldn't do anything but beef the trans and brakes further. The truck is already no slouch despite being 200ftlbs down from the ford offerings.


We can tell how much pull you have with DMax & GM


It's between zilch and nada, to be specific.  Apparently buying lots of used GM pickups doesn't get you on the board of directors, who knew?

The industry is gravitating away from 100% duty cycle capable engines and adding more complexity, this nets more power, but reduces capacity.  The early Duramax, 6BT, and 7.3 PSD are all just as complex as they needed to be.  Thanks to emissions and the ever-evolving horsepower war, which are at odds with each other, we get more "civilized" diesels that fail to perform at the same levels, as far as duty cycle is concerned, then their senior counterparts.

There's always a sweet spot, and I think that LDDs have passed theirs, and largely due to emissions and efficiency/fleet standards.

Nah, it's just the adoption of new tech in the form of emission equipment that causes reliability and "capacity" issues.  As someone that studies the details of GM engines for work I can tell you that the engineering changes have done nothing but added to the capacity.    The emissions tech has been refined as well, GM used to provide the needed excess fuel to the particulate filter regeneration via multiple injection events late in the cycle. This caused lots of fuel consumption and fuel dilution of the engine oil. Now they placed a separate injector in the exhaust system to provide fuel directly. Piezo electric injectors..internally balanced cranks..higher ratio counts in the trans... Improvements will continue. I still drive a tuned LB7 with 260k on it but the new trucks are far more capable.  If they ran loaded with 20k at highway speeds uphill they would be happier and live longer than the high heat cycle life that most of them live.  


I believe the VGT on the duramax has been largely unchanged since 2004.5.  The part number may have changed but the inducer size has been consistent i think. It's an airflow issue, I'd bet money it's getting larger.


Ldd are now producing power and torque that was once only found in rigs. Everyone now sells a light duty truck that could require a CDL licence to operate at rated capacity....that's nutty.  The allison 1000 is the same trans as the allison 2400 that was meant for transit busses and dump trucks. They just changed the ratios.   They have gotten more complex due to emissions but since the adoption of common rail direct injection they haven't been simple by any means.


Turbo is going to a different supplier for 2017.
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