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Posted: 9/7/2004 7:56:13 AM EST
like, if I have an 802.11b router, can someone with a G model card browse using my network?
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 7:56:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/7/2004 7:56:47 AM EST by fight4yourrights]
YES
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 7:57:24 AM EST
Indeed they may, but they will obviously only get the speed of wireless B, aka your router.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:00:24 AM EST
Ok. I'm not getting 11Mbps from my cable connection anyway, so G seemed like a waste of money.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:02:43 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:04:23 AM EST
If you're using B and somebody nearby is using G (say you're in an aparment complex with a lot of wireless, I have atleast 6 unsecure networks I'm getting a good signal to at home) be sure to set up all your security options. WEP keys, MAC address specification and whatever else you have available. For some reason after wireless G started hitting the market I began having connectivity issues to my B router/AP. Setting up all my security options fixed it. Think I was running only WEP at 128bit before that I started getting problems. One of the options fixed it for me.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:06:20 AM EST
Yes....
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:25:16 AM EST
OK, got WEP enabled. What's MAC, and how do I configure it for max security?
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:31:25 AM EST
A MAC address is kindof like a serial number. It's printed somewhere on every single Network card, be it a PCI card or laptop PCMCIA card. It's a unique identifier.

You should have an option in your router/ap to only allow specified MAC addresses to access your your ap.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:35:12 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:36:26 AM EST
Router should have a MAC too.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:36:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By TheRicker:
QS, you running a Linksys box?



No, it's called Network Everywhere. I got it at wally world late last night, MarianLibrarian was pissing me off and not giving up the 'puter..so I went and bought this kit and put the PCMCIA card in this old shitty notebook I have laying around.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:37:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By Mauser101:
A MAC address is kindof like a serial number. It's printed somewhere on every single Network card, be it a PCI card or laptop PCMCIA card. It's a unique identifier.

You should have an option in your router/ap to only allow specified MAC addresses to access your your ap.



Oh, ok, so I need to look at the card and allow IT access only, then?
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 8:53:05 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/7/2004 8:53:21 AM EST by TheRicker]
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 9:01:38 AM EST
On my router's configuration page (get to it through a web browser, usually the address is 192.168.1.1) there is a tab for entering the mac addresses that I want to allow to access the router. Haven't looked at it for some time, but I'm pretty sure I had to type them in individually.

I'm using a linksys, so I'm sure your options and mine are differant.
Link Posted: 9/7/2004 9:38:12 AM EST
Jebus. And I thought my head was hurting before I opened this thread.
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