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Posted: 9/21/2004 6:19:28 PM EST
i am looking at buying one and want to know if anyone has one here and what they think?
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:22:54 PM EST
Never tried one. I have gotten hooked up with a tricked out Dillion 550 !!

It cranks out rounds by the THOUSANDS!!!!!
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:24:35 PM EST
I have a Loadmaster, it's great.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:30:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 6:31:07 PM EST by meltdown]
The only Lee products I own are their tape-crimp dies.
I personally prefer RCBS for single stage and Dillion for progressive

-edited for speeling
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:34:14 PM EST
Work Great, Last A Long Time
With proper care and maintenance.
Just takes a little longer
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:37:35 PM EST
I've got one each Lee Pro 1000 for 9mm and 45ACP. They're cheap enough that it doesn't pay to acquire all the parts to convert calibers. I've got a quick-change press mounting plate on the bench. That way each press stays set up all the time. I'm happy with the performance of the units. Once set up; they will feed cases, primers, powder and even bullets with the optional feeder. All one has to do is work the handle and monitor the operation.

I've also got a Lee turret press that I use for 44 Spec. and 38/357. I don't load those in any volume and it's a good thing because the turret works only when it feels like it.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:43:57 PM EST
I made the mistake of buying some Lee reloading products when I was a new reloader, the classic temptation of low price, let me say this as gently as possible, LEE is CHEAP CRAP! It is built down to a price point, not for performance, only for price. Over the years I replaced every single Lee item I had bought, the experience was so bad I almost quit reloading, thank goodness I decided to try better quality products and found out that good products actually work. Save your money, get a decent quality product from a good brand, RCBS, Dillon, Lyman, any of those are good choices.

Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:45:29 PM EST
I have a lee turrent press that I have loaded over 10k rnds,the autoindex feature on it was a little tempermental,but I removed it and just manualy index it,works great.If speed and a large volume is needed get a dillion 550 though.the lee turrent is easy to change calibers on as your dies are in a turrent,similar to the dillon,but the turrents are much cheaper for the lee.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:48:30 PM EST
I have the Lee turret press, and it works just fine. I took the auto index thing out. The press is kinda chintsy, but the dies are as good as any other brand.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 6:50:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 6:51:31 PM EST by Hoppy]
Either people love Lee or they hate it. Not much middle ground here.

I have one of their least expensive kits and have loaded thousands of very accurate rounds with it without any problems. I still use it. There are additional items to purchase before you can really load much, but overall I have found Lee equipment to work great for me. I would say that eventually, as pieces get worn, I will replace them with higher quality items, but don't anticipate that happening for quite a while yet.

Is there better? Sure. Is there better equipment for the price? I don't think so. Can you load better ammo with something else? Again, I don't think so.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 7:34:54 PM EST
I have used Lee dies and reloaders. They always did what the advertise them to do. No problems here.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 7:39:06 PM EST
Still using my Lee kit. Use a ultrasonic tumbler to clean. Prefer Lee factory crimp dies. Planerench out.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 7:44:50 PM EST
i think ill get the lee for now to get started right now its only for reloading an odd caliber that costs me way to much to feed and is a pain in the ass to find in gun shops i usually only see like one 20rnd box at the gunshow.so i figure i can save some bucks on that plus load all my .223 and .45 brass
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 8:22:44 PM EST

Originally Posted By meltdown:
The only Lee products I own are their tape-crimp dies.
I personally prefer RCBS for single stage and Dillion for progressive

-edited for speeling



+1 on the RCBS and Dillon.
I actually prefer Lee dies to RCBS dies. I think the Lees are machined to a tighter tolerance.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 10:26:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2004 10:27:03 PM EST by Troy]
Link Posted: 9/22/2004 4:28:43 AM EST
They are good for the money.

I got a Lee when I was in H.S. The other products are build a little better (subjective I know), but my Lee Challenger single stage works well enough after 15,000 + rounds I can't justify buying another until I can afford the Dillon.

Kent
Link Posted: 9/22/2004 4:36:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By Hoppy:
Either people love Lee or they hate it. Not much middle ground here.

I have one of their least expensive kits and have loaded thousands of very accurate rounds with it without any problems. I still use it. There are additional items to purchase before you can really load much, but overall I have found Lee equipment to work great for me. I would say that eventually, as pieces get worn, I will replace them with higher quality items, but don't anticipate that happening for quite a while yet.

Is there better? Sure. Is there better equipment for the price? I don't think so. Can you load better ammo with something else? Again, I don't think so.



My experience too. I am still loading all my ammo on the cheap Lee kit I bought years ago (I did add a digital powder scale), and it works just fine. The stuff I load for my .30-06 deer rifle averages under .75 MOA, so you can definitely load very accurate ammo with Lee presses and dies.

If you load tons of ammo, go with a Dillon progressive.
Link Posted: 9/22/2004 4:42:41 AM EST
JUNK!

My Pro1000 was the biggest POS I've ever reloaded with:
1. Crappy materials: Cheap aluminum/pot metal. Every screw in the turret bored themselves out and needed to be retapped (repeatedly).
2. Lousy primer system: The Pro1000 has a "system" which senses a case and only releases a primer when a case is ready in the previous stage. As a result, many primers fail to stage. With my Dillon, you get a primer EVERY time, even when you don't want it (but it sweeps away unused primers for re-use).
3. The disc powder system: PITA.

Get a single-stage of good quality (if you don't already have one).
Then, get a Dillon or other quality progressive press.

Lee makes some good tools and dies, but their presses SUCK!
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