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Posted: 4/24/2014 9:31:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2014 10:26:27 AM EDT by LinkedM4]
im still in awe at the scale in which they build those huge buildings, domes, and pillars. and this was back in ANTIQUITY. I found a B&B right next to a supermarket and within walking distance to metro station. so we cooked dinner/breakfast and made some awesome sammaches to backpack out with.

Protip: The trick on seeing everything on your own time and w/o paying $ to a tour company and dealing with smelly people is to get a metro & bus pass for your trips duration and, the night before each day's activities, research beforehand all the site locations you plan on seeing, using google maps directions on laptop at hotel/BnB (using public transit method and options for less walking) Basically find out which metro station's local bus stops take you closest to your site, so you''ll know which metro stations to travel to, and then which bus station to go to, and then which bus to get on. Also plan how to get either back to the metro, or, if you are lucky as I was a few times, which bus stop at the site that happens to take you by bus directly to next site you want to go. BE SURE YOU CHECK THE BUS TO MAKE SURE ITS NOT ON THE RETURN ROUTE OPPOSITE THE DIRECTION YOU WANT TO GO! Their bus stops are AWESOME, they tell you exactly which buses stop there, and the stops along their route.

If you dont want to get a local SIM phone card, keep phone in airplane mode and while at hotel/BnB the night before, turn wifi on and cache every site offline on your phone. cache with the satellite and transit overlays activated.

Heres just a tiny bit of the sites I went to



















Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:33:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:35:55 AM EDT
I thought this was going to be a thread about the HBO series: Rome.



Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:39:45 AM EDT
Originally Posted By LinkedM4:

Protip: Keep an eye on your wallet and stay away from the gypsies.
View Quote


FIFY.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:40:14 AM EDT
Rome is amazing, we walked nearly everywhere there.

Don't forget to buy some horse meat while at the grocery store.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:41:35 AM EDT
Make sure to see the Vatican. It is awesome in the actual sense of the word.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:41:47 AM EDT
Get a pretty good buzz going, then take a taxi ride through the city center at rush hour. It's a more enjoyable ride than anything Disney World can ever offer.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:42:22 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:43:48 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By AR4U:
Make sure to see the Vatican. It is awesome in the actual sense of the word.
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+1000
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:48:57 AM EDT
Spent almost a month in Italy several years ago. It was great. But still loved coming home to the good old USA. I was dying for some American fast food. I didn't eat pasta or tomatoes for a month. We did eat at one place that cooked a side of beef over a open pit fire and brought massive plates of sliced off meat to your table. It was great. That and the gallons of wine were fantastic.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 9:49:31 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By raysheen:


FIFY.
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Originally Posted By raysheen:
Originally Posted By LinkedM4:

Protip: Keep an eye on your wallet and stay away from the gypsies.


FIFY.


If your group makes it through without witnessing or being the actual victim of pickpocketing, it will be the first group I've heard of not to get ripped off.

The Vatican is amazing - although after the first six or so rooms, my mind just stops taking in new input and I start to get a bit blase about the whole thing.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:03:29 AM EDT


I've been to Rome a dozen times or so. To me, the most impressive thing I saw there was the Pantheon. We were walking through some of the small side streets when we came across it. Turned a corner and boom, there is a nearly 2000 year old concrete building and it is FUCKING HUGE. Extremely impressive.


I think it's most impressive to me because it's still intact. Incredible engineering. I could only imagine what the Flavian looked like when it was in one piece.



Beautiful, beautiful city.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:03:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:04:28 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By rhane71:
Spent almost a month in Italy several years ago. It was great. But still loved coming home to the good old USA. I was dying for some American fast food. I didn't eat pasta or tomatoes for a month. We did eat at one place that cooked a side of beef over a open pit fire and brought massive plates of sliced off meat to your table. It was great. That and the gallons of wine were fantastic.
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You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:05:19 AM EDT
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It's a shame there are hardly any good pictures of Rome on the net.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:07:01 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Patriot328:




You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?
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Originally Posted By Patriot328:
Originally Posted By rhane71:
Spent almost a month in Italy several years ago. It was great. But still loved coming home to the good old USA. I was dying for some American fast food. I didn't eat pasta or tomatoes for a month. We did eat at one place that cooked a side of beef over a open pit fire and brought massive plates of sliced off meat to your table. It was great. That and the gallons of wine were fantastic.




You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?
One of the best things about traveling is it really makes you appreciate what you enjoy about home. McDonalds was never one of those things for me.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:14:54 AM EDT
yes it is, I just got back myself,

If you get a chance eat here http://kilorestaurant.it/
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:17:43 AM EDT
I'm assuming you are not talking about Rome, GA.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:24:06 AM EDT
As awesome as the vatican is, the thing that stands out in my mind about my visit is the hot chick that was walking up the steps right in front of me. Dirtiest f'ing feet I have ever seen. And this chick was hot, probably greek. I noticed because we were packed in like cattle and she was right in front of me going up the steps, so her feet were coming up to about chest height on me.

Some of those europeans can be downright nasty.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:24:42 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By georgiagun:
I'm assuming you are not talking about Rome, GA.
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No the series. I didn't see any buses though .
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:26:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2014 10:28:17 AM EDT by S-28]
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Originally Posted By Patriot328:


I've been to Rome a dozen times or so. To me, the most impressive thing I saw there was the Pantheon. We were walking through some of the small side streets when we came across it. Turned a corner and boom, there is a nearly 2000 year old concrete building and it is FUCKING HUGE. Extremely impressive.


I think it's most impressive to me because it's still intact. Incredible engineering. I could only imagine what the Flavian looked like when it was in one piece.



Beautiful, beautiful city.
View Quote


Yep.
The Pantheon is one of those things that should not be, but is right there with it's ass in everyones face in defiance.

The engineering and building techniques that were "lost" until the late 1800's, and materials that weren't "Rediscovered" until the last 50 years or so.

Then when you're standing there eyeballing the frescoe brilliance a thought creeps in. "Why havn't we done anything this fucking awesome, with all of our advances?"
Then the ground rumbles a bit, and you remember the place gets hit with earthquakes on par with those that have destroyed our modern buildings, and has forever....yet the Coloseum, Pantheon, and ancient buildings still stand.

The Coloseum is pretty awesome when taken in visually, but it gets downright mind blowing when you narrow the focus a bit and start eyeballing the details of the structure that make it possible.
Simple, elegant details that overcome herculean challenges. The tapered Iron alloy tensioning pins, in the compression straps on every column, that allow gravity to reinforce the structure rather than fight it, while giving flexibility for seismic movement....and concrete that is stronger than anything we had developed, until it was directly replicated several years back.

We SUCK at bieng Roman.

A quick trip to Ostia just blows the mind, and it's too hard to take in without a couple days to get comfy with the reality of it.
If Rome hadn't fallen, where would we be now? Space age atomic Romans with electricity, by the 1,400's? earlier?



Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:28:05 AM EDT
It's the same in Florence or Venice to some extent............I learned from another traveler the benefits of a "throwdown" wallet while keeping your real wallet hidden


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Originally Posted By raysheen:


FIFY.
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Originally Posted By raysheen:
Originally Posted By LinkedM4:

Protip: Keep an eye on your wallet and stay away from the gypsies.


FIFY.

Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:28:10 AM EDT
pics in ops of just a few of the sites I went to
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:28:53 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By raysheen:


FIFY.
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Originally Posted By raysheen:
Originally Posted By LinkedM4:

Protip: Keep an eye on your wallet and stay away from the gypsies.


FIFY.
This. I got by camera bag pick-pocketed while looking at a Michaelangelo sculpture in a church. Later in the week I had to punch a gypsy who was starting to cross the line between pick pocketing and straight up robbery. The Caribineri were nearby and getting quite a laugh out of it. One of them told me they weren't going to let the guy get away with it but somehow they thought my response was going to be more entertaining.

Rome is one of those cities that has just a perfect pace of life.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:29:20 AM EDT
Tag for when my wife and I go there on the honeymoon we never had.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:30:38 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By jerrwhy01:
Get a pretty good buzz going, then take a taxi ride through the city center at rush hour. It's a more enjoyable ride than anything Disney World can ever offer.
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Tell your driver that Italians are good drivers but the greatest one who ever lived was a Brazilian. He'll take that as a personal challenge.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:34:51 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By S-28:


Yep.
The Pantheon is one of those things that should not be, but is right there with it's ass in everyones face in defiance.

The engineering and building techniques that were "lost" until the late 1800's, and materials that weren't "Rediscovered" until the last 50 years or so.

Then when you're standing there eyeballing the frescoe brilliance a thought creeps in. "Why havn't we done anything this fucking awesome, with all of our advances?"
Then the ground rumbles a bit, and you remember the place gets hit with earthquakes on par with those that have destroyed our modern buildings, and has forever....yet the Coloseum, Pantheon, and ancient buildings still stand.

The Coloseum is pretty awesome when taken in visually, but it gets downright mind blowing when you narrow the focus a bit and start eyeballing the details of the structure that make it possible.
Simple, elegant details that overcome herculean challenges. The tapered Iron alloy tensioning pins, in the compression straps on every column, that allow gravity to reinforce the structure rather than fight it, while giving flexibility for seismic movement....and concrete that is stronger than anything we had developed, until it was directly replicated several years back.

We SUCK at bieng Roman.

A quick trip to Ostia just blows the mind, and it's too hard to take in without a couple days to get comfy with the reality of it.
If Rome hadn't fallen, where would we be now? Space age atomic Romans with electricity, by the 1,400's? earlier?



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Originally Posted By S-28:
Originally Posted By Patriot328:


I've been to Rome a dozen times or so. To me, the most impressive thing I saw there was the Pantheon. We were walking through some of the small side streets when we came across it. Turned a corner and boom, there is a nearly 2000 year old concrete building and it is FUCKING HUGE. Extremely impressive.


I think it's most impressive to me because it's still intact. Incredible engineering. I could only imagine what the Flavian looked like when it was in one piece.



Beautiful, beautiful city.


Yep.
The Pantheon is one of those things that should not be, but is right there with it's ass in everyones face in defiance.

The engineering and building techniques that were "lost" until the late 1800's, and materials that weren't "Rediscovered" until the last 50 years or so.

Then when you're standing there eyeballing the frescoe brilliance a thought creeps in. "Why havn't we done anything this fucking awesome, with all of our advances?"
Then the ground rumbles a bit, and you remember the place gets hit with earthquakes on par with those that have destroyed our modern buildings, and has forever....yet the Coloseum, Pantheon, and ancient buildings still stand.

The Coloseum is pretty awesome when taken in visually, but it gets downright mind blowing when you narrow the focus a bit and start eyeballing the details of the structure that make it possible.
Simple, elegant details that overcome herculean challenges. The tapered Iron alloy tensioning pins, in the compression straps on every column, that allow gravity to reinforce the structure rather than fight it, while giving flexibility for seismic movement....and concrete that is stronger than anything we had developed, until it was directly replicated several years back.

We SUCK at bieng Roman.

A quick trip to Ostia just blows the mind, and it's too hard to take in without a couple days to get comfy with the reality of it.
If Rome hadn't fallen, where would we be now? Space age atomic Romans with electricity, by the 1,400's? earlier?






agree 100%, the pantheon is what floored me the most as well. and what is it with the germans and turks?? not only was jointly screwing up east/west empires not enough for them, but they had to start 2 world wars as well.

and I never new they still use the term SPQR to this day.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:35:47 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cyclone:
It's the same in Florence or Venice to some extent............I learned from another traveler the benefits of a "throwdown" wallet while keeping your real wallet hidden



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Originally Posted By cyclone:
It's the same in Florence or Venice to some extent............I learned from another traveler the benefits of a "throwdown" wallet while keeping your real wallet hidden


Originally Posted By raysheen:
Originally Posted By LinkedM4:

Protip: Keep an eye on your wallet and stay away from the gypsies.


FIFY.



I actually dropped the wallet in a Roman cab. Was freaking out in the hotel trying to cancel the cards, when the desk called to notify me to come to the desk.

There was the Cabbie with my wallet. A passenger found it, and gave it to him.

Everything was there including 200E, so I handed the cash to the guy and thanked him profusely. It would have taken 87X that much in PITA value, to replace all the shit in the wallet.

The damn Gypsies and algerians are the problem, no doubt. I have a different impression of the avg Roman folks though.



Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:38:45 AM EDT
How do you go on vacation to a place like Rome and consciously decide to cook your own meals and pack your own sandwiches? Part of experiencing the local culture is enjoying the local food. Preparation is key when it comes to food, which means the locals need to prepare it too. I can understand the occasional fare from an open air market or supermarket and I agree with avoiding corporate chains, but the majority of your meals should come from small restaurants on the local economy. It doesn't have to break the budget, but you should plan to spend some money to make the most of the experience.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:40:31 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By S-28:


Yep.
The Pantheon is one of those things that should not be, but is right there with it's ass in everyones face in defiance.

The engineering and building techniques that were "lost" until the late 1800's, and materials that weren't "Rediscovered" until the last 50 years or so.

Then when you're standing there eyeballing the frescoe brilliance a thought creeps in. "Why havn't we done anything this fucking awesome, with all of our advances?"
Then the ground rumbles a bit, and you remember the place gets hit with earthquakes on par with those that have destroyed our modern buildings, and has forever....yet the Coloseum, Pantheon, and ancient buildings still stand.

The Coloseum is pretty awesome when taken in visually, but it gets downright mind blowing when you narrow the focus a bit and start eyeballing the details of the structure that make it possible.
Simple, elegant details that overcome herculean challenges. The tapered Iron alloy tensioning pins, in the compression straps on every column, that allow gravity to reinforce the structure rather than fight it, while giving flexibility for seismic movement....and concrete that is stronger than anything we had developed, until it was directly replicated several years back.

We SUCK at bieng Roman.

A quick trip to Ostia just blows the mind, and it's too hard to take in without a couple days to get comfy with the reality of it.
If Rome hadn't fallen, where would we be now? Space age atomic Romans with electricity, by the 1,400's? earlier?



View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By S-28:
Originally Posted By Patriot328:


I've been to Rome a dozen times or so. To me, the most impressive thing I saw there was the Pantheon. We were walking through some of the small side streets when we came across it. Turned a corner and boom, there is a nearly 2000 year old concrete building and it is FUCKING HUGE. Extremely impressive.


I think it's most impressive to me because it's still intact. Incredible engineering. I could only imagine what the Flavian looked like when it was in one piece.



Beautiful, beautiful city.


Yep.
The Pantheon is one of those things that should not be, but is right there with it's ass in everyones face in defiance.

The engineering and building techniques that were "lost" until the late 1800's, and materials that weren't "Rediscovered" until the last 50 years or so.

Then when you're standing there eyeballing the frescoe brilliance a thought creeps in. "Why havn't we done anything this fucking awesome, with all of our advances?"
Then the ground rumbles a bit, and you remember the place gets hit with earthquakes on par with those that have destroyed our modern buildings, and has forever....yet the Coloseum, Pantheon, and ancient buildings still stand.

The Coloseum is pretty awesome when taken in visually, but it gets downright mind blowing when you narrow the focus a bit and start eyeballing the details of the structure that make it possible.
Simple, elegant details that overcome herculean challenges. The tapered Iron alloy tensioning pins, in the compression straps on every column, that allow gravity to reinforce the structure rather than fight it, while giving flexibility for seismic movement....and concrete that is stronger than anything we had developed, until it was directly replicated several years back.

We SUCK at bieng Roman.

A quick trip to Ostia just blows the mind, and it's too hard to take in without a couple days to get comfy with the reality of it.
If Rome hadn't fallen, where would we be now? Space age atomic Romans with electricity, by the 1,400's? earlier?





I sometimes think that if they had just put the Greel aeolipile to use, and then discovered what turning a magnet in a coil of copper does, not only would the Empire still exist, but every possible planet in the solar system would be colonized.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:44:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2014 10:46:51 AM EDT by S-28]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LinkedM4:



agree 100%, the pantheon is what floored me the most as well. and what is it with the germans and turks?? not only was jointly screwing up east/west empires not enough for them, but they had to start 2 world wars as well.

and I never new they still use the term SPQR to this day.
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Originally Posted By LinkedM4:
Originally Posted By S-28:
Originally Posted By Patriot328:


I've been to Rome a dozen times or so. To me, the most impressive thing I saw there was the Pantheon. We were walking through some of the small side streets when we came across it. Turned a corner and boom, there is a nearly 2000 year old concrete building and it is FUCKING HUGE. Extremely impressive.


I think it's most impressive to me because it's still intact. Incredible engineering. I could only imagine what the Flavian looked like when it was in one piece.



Beautiful, beautiful city.


Yep.
The Pantheon is one of those things that should not be, but is right there with it's ass in everyones face in defiance.

The engineering and building techniques that were "lost" until the late 1800's, and materials that weren't "Rediscovered" until the last 50 years or so.

Then when you're standing there eyeballing the frescoe brilliance a thought creeps in. "Why havn't we done anything this fucking awesome, with all of our advances?"
Then the ground rumbles a bit, and you remember the place gets hit with earthquakes on par with those that have destroyed our modern buildings, and has forever....yet the Coloseum, Pantheon, and ancient buildings still stand.

The Coloseum is pretty awesome when taken in visually, but it gets downright mind blowing when you narrow the focus a bit and start eyeballing the details of the structure that make it possible.
Simple, elegant details that overcome herculean challenges. The tapered Iron alloy tensioning pins, in the compression straps on every column, that allow gravity to reinforce the structure rather than fight it, while giving flexibility for seismic movement....and concrete that is stronger than anything we had developed, until it was directly replicated several years back.

We SUCK at bieng Roman.

A quick trip to Ostia just blows the mind, and it's too hard to take in without a couple days to get comfy with the reality of it.
If Rome hadn't fallen, where would we be now? Space age atomic Romans with electricity, by the 1,400's? earlier?






agree 100%, the pantheon is what floored me the most as well. and what is it with the germans and turks?? not only was jointly screwing up east/west empires not enough for them, but they had to start 2 world wars as well.

and I never new they still use the term SPQR to this day.



"Sono Pazzi Questi Romani"

It's not like they adhere to the principles of a representative Govt...so it's gotta be a mockery in contempt of the concept these days.





Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:44:47 AM EDT
We had a few locals who told us who to watch out for and who to stay away from at the hotel...............thankfully I never got pickpocketed, but they tried it on a few of the group I was with. The locals were very friendly though, especially in Venice...........

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Originally Posted By S-28:


I actually dropped the wallet in a Roman cab. Was freaking out in the hotel trying to cancel the cards, when the desk called to notify me to come to the desk.

There was the Cabbie with my wallet. A passenger found it, and gave it to him.

Everything was there including 200E, so I handed the cash to the guy and thanked him profusely. It would have taken 87X that much in PITA value, to replace all the shit in the wallet.

The damn Gypsies and algerians are the problem, no doubt. I have a different impression of the avg Roman folks though.



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Originally Posted By S-28:
Originally Posted By cyclone:
It's the same in Florence or Venice to some extent............I learned from another traveler the benefits of a "throwdown" wallet while keeping your real wallet hidden


Originally Posted By raysheen:
Originally Posted By LinkedM4:

Protip: Keep an eye on your wallet and stay away from the gypsies.


FIFY.



I actually dropped the wallet in a Roman cab. Was freaking out in the hotel trying to cancel the cards, when the desk called to notify me to come to the desk.

There was the Cabbie with my wallet. A passenger found it, and gave it to him.

Everything was there including 200E, so I handed the cash to the guy and thanked him profusely. It would have taken 87X that much in PITA value, to replace all the shit in the wallet.

The damn Gypsies and algerians are the problem, no doubt. I have a different impression of the avg Roman folks though.




Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:46:05 AM EDT
I have not been to Rome in years. Going back in June and I keep spotting these threads and holy crap I can not get any work done.

I just found you can do night tours of the Colosseum and its basement. I dont normally pay for tours, but I am for that one unless someone can talk me out of it.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:46:42 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By RescueGunner:
How do you go on vacation to a place like Rome and consciously decide to cook your own meals and pack your own sandwiches? Part of experiencing the local culture is enjoying the local food. Preparation is key when it comes to food, which means the locals need to prepare it too. I can understand the occasional fare from an open air market or supermarket and I agree with avoiding corporate chains, but the majority of your meals should come from small restaurants on the local economy. It doesn't have to break the budget, but you should plan to spend some money to make the most of the experience.
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Eh...when I went to Rome,most of the food was mediocre at best. Of course, I was in the touristy area and I couldn't pick a decent place to save my life. Later on, some Italian friends showed me some good restaurants, which were pretty amazing; but there is no shortage of shitty, expensive, high-end dining in Rome.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:47:14 AM EDT
They have McDonalds but 8 euros for a regular cheese burger meal was outrageous and finding an American fast food place was a pain in the ass. In my opinion Italian food is bland compared to Texas/Louisiana food. I am not saying it wasn't good. I loved eating there. I just missed home food. But I guess that is normal.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:50:58 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Patriot328:




You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?
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Originally Posted By Patriot328:
Originally Posted By rhane71:
Spent almost a month in Italy several years ago. It was great. But still loved coming home to the good old USA. I was dying for some American fast food. I didn't eat pasta or tomatoes for a month. We did eat at one place that cooked a side of beef over a open pit fire and brought massive plates of sliced off meat to your table. It was great. That and the gallons of wine were fantastic.




You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?


Would you pull a face if he said he was missing carrying his gun? No? Why would McDonald's be any different?


Fuck yeah!

If I am on a long stay I crave something 'MERICAN. Hard Rock cafes are usually the "do it" for me. McDonalds in foreign countries can be a good experience too since their local culture really influences the menu items with an American twist.

Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:52:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2014 10:53:42 AM EDT by Luchs]
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Originally Posted By TacticalHeater:


Would you pull a face if he said he was missing carrying his gun? No? Why would McDonald's be any different?


Fuck yeah!

If I am on a long stay I crave something 'MERICAN. Hard Rock cafes are usually the "do it" for me. McDonalds in foreign countries can be a good experience too since their local culture really influences the menu items with an American twist.

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Originally Posted By TacticalHeater:
Originally Posted By Patriot328:
Originally Posted By rhane71:
Spent almost a month in Italy several years ago. It was great. But still loved coming home to the good old USA. I was dying for some American fast food. I didn't eat pasta or tomatoes for a month. We did eat at one place that cooked a side of beef over a open pit fire and brought massive plates of sliced off meat to your table. It was great. That and the gallons of wine were fantastic.




You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?


Would you pull a face if he said he was missing carrying his gun? No? Why would McDonald's be any different?


Fuck yeah!

If I am on a long stay I crave something 'MERICAN. Hard Rock cafes are usually the "do it" for me. McDonalds in foreign countries can be a good experience too since their local culture really influences the menu items with an American twist.




It's more amusing that Burger King in Australia is Hungry Jacks, all marketing. The whole prison colony thing has them slightly soured on monarchy.

Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:53:48 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bartholomew_Roberts:


Eh...when I went to Rome,most of the food was mediocre at best. Of course, I was in the touristy area and I couldn't pick a decent place to save my life. Later on, some Italian friends showed me some good restaurants, which were pretty amazing; but there is no shortage of shitty, expensive, high-end dining in Rome.
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Originally Posted By Bartholomew_Roberts:
Originally Posted By RescueGunner:
How do you go on vacation to a place like Rome and consciously decide to cook your own meals and pack your own sandwiches? Part of experiencing the local culture is enjoying the local food. Preparation is key when it comes to food, which means the locals need to prepare it too. I can understand the occasional fare from an open air market or supermarket and I agree with avoiding corporate chains, but the majority of your meals should come from small restaurants on the local economy. It doesn't have to break the budget, but you should plan to spend some money to make the most of the experience.


Eh...when I went to Rome,most of the food was mediocre at best. Of course, I was in the touristy area and I couldn't pick a decent place to save my life. Later on, some Italian friends showed me some good restaurants, which were pretty amazing; but there is no shortage of shitty, expensive, high-end dining in Rome.
Yeah. I didn't realize just how ho-hum some Roman food was until I got to Florence. Now those are some people who take eating to a whole different level.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 10:56:32 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bartholomew_Roberts:


Eh...when I went to Rome,most of the food was mediocre at best. Of course, I was in the touristy area and I couldn't pick a decent place to save my life. Later on, some Italian friends showed me some good restaurants, which were pretty amazing; but there is no shortage of shitty, expensive, high-end dining in Rome.
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Originally Posted By Bartholomew_Roberts:
Originally Posted By RescueGunner:
How do you go on vacation to a place like Rome and consciously decide to cook your own meals and pack your own sandwiches? Part of experiencing the local culture is enjoying the local food. Preparation is key when it comes to food, which means the locals need to prepare it too. I can understand the occasional fare from an open air market or supermarket and I agree with avoiding corporate chains, but the majority of your meals should come from small restaurants on the local economy. It doesn't have to break the budget, but you should plan to spend some money to make the most of the experience.


Eh...when I went to Rome,most of the food was mediocre at best. Of course, I was in the touristy area and I couldn't pick a decent place to save my life. Later on, some Italian friends showed me some good restaurants, which were pretty amazing; but there is no shortage of shitty, expensive, high-end dining in Rome.


Side streets.

Everything on the main pathways is high rent and high tax, so only high turnover low input outfits can survive there on tourists.

The little cart sized side streets that join blocks are where the avg. Roman folks open a proper Trattoria, for the local clientelle.
If the gal or guy that meets you at the door dosn't speak english....ya found a good one.
Usually, there is no Menu, just a meal of the day with a couple options, and it's best to take all of them.

It's the same in Bologna, Napoli, Venice, and all the other larger tourist areas.
Hit the smaller towns and finding outstanding chow is like falling off a log. Just pay attention to where the locals are heading and follow them.
Shit...the greasy pizza bar around the corner from the Bus stop in Borgo Panigale, would rate 3 Michelin stars if it weren't for the owner constantly chasing off the street urchins.


Link Posted: 4/24/2014 11:07:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/24/2014 11:10:49 AM EDT by LinkedM4]
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Originally Posted By RescueGunner:
How do you go on vacation to a place like Rome and consciously decide to cook your own meals and pack your own sandwiches? Part of experiencing the local culture is enjoying the local food. Preparation is key when it comes to food, which means the locals need to prepare it too. I can understand the occasional fare from an open air market or supermarket and I agree with avoiding corporate chains, but the majority of your meals should come from small restaurants on the local economy. It doesn't have to break the budget, but you should plan to spend some money to make the most of the experience.
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we did 1 sit in $$$ dinner. it was meh except for the appetizer which was some uncooked thin slices of some meat that was really good. my last day, i did eat out 2 lunches, got some decent local grub then, plus a 9% beer. beer and wine there are cheaper than water. oh and all the walking i did allowed me to really put away some gelato, like 3x per day.

plus their ham and salami and cheeses in the markets there are insanely good/spicy
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 11:10:53 AM EDT
That's kinda funny..............I remember being in Nuremburg, Germany and going to a Burger King and seeing a "Hawaiian King" on the menu. Not knowing what it was I ordered it, and found it was a Whopper with pineapple on it. Lots of weird stuff there, but they have beer in the BK and McDonalds


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Originally Posted By Luchs:



It's more amusing that Burger King in Australia is Hungry Jacks, all marketing. The whole prison colony thing has them slightly soured on monarchy.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/b/b1/Hungry_Jack's.svg/120px-Hungry_Jack's.svg.png
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Originally Posted By Luchs:
Originally Posted By TacticalHeater:
Originally Posted By Patriot328:
Originally Posted By rhane71:
Spent almost a month in Italy several years ago. It was great. But still loved coming home to the good old USA. I was dying for some American fast food. I didn't eat pasta or tomatoes for a month. We did eat at one place that cooked a side of beef over a open pit fire and brought massive plates of sliced off meat to your table. It was great. That and the gallons of wine were fantastic.




You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?


Would you pull a face if he said he was missing carrying his gun? No? Why would McDonald's be any different?


Fuck yeah!

If I am on a long stay I crave something 'MERICAN. Hard Rock cafes are usually the "do it" for me. McDonalds in foreign countries can be a good experience too since their local culture really influences the menu items with an American twist.




It's more amusing that Burger King in Australia is Hungry Jacks, all marketing. The whole prison colony thing has them slightly soured on monarchy.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/b/b1/Hungry_Jack's.svg/120px-Hungry_Jack's.svg.png

Link Posted: 4/24/2014 11:11:08 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By jeepnstein:
Yeah. I didn't realize just how ho-hum some Roman food was until I got to Florence. Now those are some people who take eating to a whole different level.
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Originally Posted By jeepnstein:
Originally Posted By Bartholomew_Roberts:
Originally Posted By RescueGunner:
How do you go on vacation to a place like Rome and consciously decide to cook your own meals and pack your own sandwiches? Part of experiencing the local culture is enjoying the local food. Preparation is key when it comes to food, which means the locals need to prepare it too. I can understand the occasional fare from an open air market or supermarket and I agree with avoiding corporate chains, but the majority of your meals should come from small restaurants on the local economy. It doesn't have to break the budget, but you should plan to spend some money to make the most of the experience.


Eh...when I went to Rome,most of the food was mediocre at best. Of course, I was in the touristy area and I couldn't pick a decent place to save my life. Later on, some Italian friends showed me some good restaurants, which were pretty amazing; but there is no shortage of shitty, expensive, high-end dining in Rome.
Yeah. I didn't realize just how ho-hum some Roman food was until I got to Florence. Now those are some people who take eating to a whole different level.


Firenzie is known for rustic chow..it's awesome. If you want elaborate and artfull with multi layers of flavor and a mind blowing experience, head north. Emilia-Romagna has thier very own style of chow, like every region, but is especially artfull about taking everything to the next level as the norm. The grocery stores in the region ( COOP) are akin to gourmet restaraunt supply centers....it's mind blowing.

There really is no such thing as "Italian food". The traditions and dishes were established regionally, and long before Garibaldi unified what is known as Italy now.
Crap, Sieneese chow is distinctly different than Chiusi chow, thanks to a couple thousand years of bieng distinct and seperate.

Take the bickering and differences between Texas and Carolina BBQ and magnify it 87 billion times.
It's part of the reason it takes a lifetime to understand the whole place. The Romans did not demand a homogeneous culture, and simply built upon the strengths of each that were conquered, so thousands of years
of distinct cultures are still evident regionally, and even down to the specific campanile.

A month in Italy is like 10min in the Smithsonian.



Link Posted: 4/24/2014 11:13:36 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By S-28:


Side streets.

Everything on the main pathways is high rent and high tax, so only high turnover low input outfits can survive there on tourists.

The little cart sized side streets that join blocks are where the avg. Roman folks open a proper Trattoria, for the local clientelle.
If the gal or guy that meets you at the door dosn't speak english....ya found a good one.
Usually, there is no Menu, just a meal of the day with a couple options, and it's best to take all of them.

It's the same in Bologna, Napoli, Venice, and all the other larger tourist areas.
Hit the smaller towns and finding outstanding chow is like falling off a log. Just pay attention to where the locals are heading and follow them.
Shit...the greasy pizza bar around the corner from the Bus stop in Borgo Panigale, would rate 3 Michelin stars if it weren't for the owner constantly chasing off the street urchins.


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Originally Posted By S-28:
Originally Posted By Bartholomew_Roberts:
Originally Posted By RescueGunner:
How do you go on vacation to a place like Rome and consciously decide to cook your own meals and pack your own sandwiches? Part of experiencing the local culture is enjoying the local food. Preparation is key when it comes to food, which means the locals need to prepare it too. I can understand the occasional fare from an open air market or supermarket and I agree with avoiding corporate chains, but the majority of your meals should come from small restaurants on the local economy. It doesn't have to break the budget, but you should plan to spend some money to make the most of the experience.


Eh...when I went to Rome,most of the food was mediocre at best. Of course, I was in the touristy area and I couldn't pick a decent place to save my life. Later on, some Italian friends showed me some good restaurants, which were pretty amazing; but there is no shortage of shitty, expensive, high-end dining in Rome.


Side streets.

Everything on the main pathways is high rent and high tax, so only high turnover low input outfits can survive there on tourists.

The little cart sized side streets that join blocks are where the avg. Roman folks open a proper Trattoria, for the local clientelle.
If the gal or guy that meets you at the door dosn't speak english....ya found a good one.
Usually, there is no Menu, just a meal of the day with a couple options, and it's best to take all of them.

It's the same in Bologna, Napoli, Venice, and all the other larger tourist areas.
Hit the smaller towns and finding outstanding chow is like falling off a log. Just pay attention to where the locals are heading and follow them.
Shit...the greasy pizza bar around the corner from the Bus stop in Borgo Panigale, would rate 3 Michelin stars if it weren't for the owner constantly chasing off the street urchins.


We hit one place especially like that in Rome. We were wandering in the general vicinity of the Trevi Fountain. It looked like a nice place and the guy at the door looked us over and invited us in. We made it clear from the beginning we were in it for the long haul. Wonderful and attentive service, food that was just perfection, and we had to chase them down for our check at the end because they planned on keeping us there with them all night. The locals who were there mostly were very well-dressed young men who would go into the back and chat with a very serious looking Italian gentleman for a minute before they sat down to eat. The atmosphere was quiet and dignified. Since we were well-dressed we kind of blended in except for everyone noticing my wife's red hair and smile. I can be pretty sure we were the only Americans there.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 11:18:47 AM EDT


Here is a tip;

If you are in the coliseum and you want to step up a stone plying to get a better picture, don't do it.



While there was a "language" barrier between me and the grounds keepers / guards we had no problem communicating. I clearly understood "get down from there or you are getting you ass kicked" through body language and hand gestures. I am sharp like that...

The bad thing about Rome was we were constantly getting hustled. People would spot us and drive up and try to sell us shit. leather jackets, trinkets, Levi's (WTF?) shoes, all kinds of stuff.

the history was amazing though.



Link Posted: 4/24/2014 11:21:58 AM EDT
I dont think I ever ate a bad meal the whole time I was in Florence or Venice.................some day I will see Rome though
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 12:37:02 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By S-28:

Side streets.

Everything on the main pathways is high rent and high tax, so only high turnover low input outfits can survive there on tourists.

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Yeah, I tried side streets, main streets, etc. During my time there, I walked most of the time - Spanish Steps, Vatican City, the Forum, Circus Maximus... I just didn't have much luck finding good places to eat. As someone else noted, a lot of the food was really bland. I tried places where they spoke no English, etc. The one place that I really liked and remember was way out of the way. We ended up taking a taxi to it and were probably the only Americans there.

I guess it is like everywhere else I've traveled - the better the view, the worse the food is
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 12:44:40 PM EDT
I've spent the last two summers in Rome and to a lesser extent the rest of Italy. I find Rome to be the most beautiful city in the world. I hope to return within the next few years. If you know what you're doing, you can spend over a month in-country for less than $10,000 for two people, including airfare.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 12:47:14 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Patriot328:




You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?
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Originally Posted By Patriot328:
Originally Posted By rhane71:
Spent almost a month in Italy several years ago. It was great. But still loved coming home to the good old USA. I was dying for some American fast food. I didn't eat pasta or tomatoes for a month. We did eat at one place that cooked a side of beef over a open pit fire and brought massive plates of sliced off meat to your table. It was great. That and the gallons of wine were fantastic.




You were in Italy and missing McDonalds?


After about a month I started missing some American foods. The McDonald's in Rome is actually really good, as are the Burger King and Subway. They actually use quality food.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 12:48:51 PM EDT
The best calamari and fish I ever had was in Burano and Florence had the best risotto. We had great wild boar in Tuscany at a wine vineyard. But if you ask my wife, the best food in the whole country is the gelato in every city and town. We could not pass a stand or shop without buying some. I say would say "it's the leaning tower and she would say, hey there's a gelato place". It was kinda funny. I have hundreds of pictures. Milan was a shocker. I was surprised to see so many hookers showing off the goods right in front of some of the hotels at night. You would drive by and they would open their coats and they would be bare underneath. It was crazy. The have some crazy wild clubs as well.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 12:49:41 PM EDT
Get a guide. I recommend milesandmiles.it. They are like family to me, mostly because they stole my sister.
Link Posted: 4/24/2014 12:49:44 PM EDT
Thanks for the pictures OP. I was born in Italy. I've always wanted to go back to visit.
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