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Posted: 12/17/2016 12:43:14 PM EST
Just as a thought exercise, say I have a sheet of .063 4037. Bending it by, (clamp and mallet, no brake) to 45 degrees.

Think it will have less chance of cracking if it's heated?

Anyone who says bend against the grain will be ignored.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 12:46:48 PM EST
Heat it tell red hot.. should bend easy peesy
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 12:48:10 PM EST
What kind of heat treatment?
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 12:48:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2016 12:49:59 PM EST by AeroE]
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 12:49:28 PM EST
Depending on the composition of the aluminum heat it to about 1200°f (660°C) and it should be real easy to bend.
I'd recommend gloves and a crucible just to be safe...
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 12:52:56 PM EST
Your minimum bend radius is somewhere near 0.25.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 12:54:17 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Gingerbreadman:
What kind of heat treatment?
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After bending? none
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 12:58:54 PM EST
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Originally Posted By katrina24:
Heat it tell red hot.. should bend easy peesy
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That will make it interesting


No reason to heat thin aluminum sheeting for a simple bend. Make sure you look at the grain and make sure the bend is not in the same direction as the grain.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 12:59:53 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:00:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/17/2016 1:03:35 PM EST by maggiethecat]
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Originally Posted By AeroE:
You have 2024 aluminum alloy made to AMS 4037.

A billion pounds of that material have been bent without heat. Since you might not know the heat treat condition, bend it with a minimum 0.125 bend radius. Don't scribe the bend set back lines.

If you get it hot, it's going to age harden toward a -T3 and then -T81 state, so the bend radius required will be greater than in the annealed condition. Heating is nothing but down side.

You are wrong about bending this material against the grain, if you know what you're doing. About a billion pounds have been bent that way, too.
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I know what I have including the T. Says right here on the sheet. and I know it can be bent against the grain.

While I haven't bent billions of pounds of it, it'd easily say thousand of bends.

See, this is a thought exercise, not a "should I do it?"
While i'm not an engineer, by school or trade, we work in the same industry.

Edited to fix auto-incorrect
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:02:54 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AeroE:
You have 2024 aluminum alloy made to AMS 4037.

A billion pounds of that material have been bent without heat. Since you might not know the heat treat condition, bend it with a minimum 0.125 bend radius. Don't scribe the bend set back lines.

If you get it hot, it's going to age harden toward a -T3 and then -T81 state, so the bend radius required will be greater than in the annealed condition. Heating is nothing but down side.

You are wrong about bending this material against the grain, if you know what you're doing. About a billion pounds have been bent that way, too.
View Quote

This, but I'd use more than a 2T bend radius if doing it the way the OP talks about.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:05:32 PM EST
Uh yea I would say NO
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:06:17 PM EST
Just get a sheet of O metal, and then do anything you want to it, then you heat treat it. Or you could pick up a book and do things the right way instead of making up your own shade tree mechanic rules.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:12:31 PM EST
In this thread it is easy to tell who knows what they are talking about and who doesn't
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:16:30 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Palm:
In this thread it is easy to tell who knows what they are talking about and who doesn't
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I have no idea what any of you said, I am here for the post count.  Interesting information though.  
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:20:06 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 1:23:41 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 2:59:12 PM EST
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Originally Posted By AeroE:


What you should do is cut some strips and make a few bends to find out how it goes. Bending in a vise ranges from "that's too tight and it broke" to "should have controlled the bend better, that's too large and it ain't gonna fit".

The post photos of the experiment. Make one bend with layout lines scribed in the material.
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Scribe the bend lines you say????


Ok, just for giggles I'll get a peice of it in strips and we'll try bends every 15 degrees, with and without heat. 105 will probably be my max, due to clamp setup. This will give me something to do tomorrow after work I guess.
Link Posted: 12/17/2016 3:03:20 PM EST
Originally Posted By maggiethecat:
Just as a thought exercise, say I have a sheet of .063 4037. Bending it by, (clamp and mallet, no brake) to 45 degrees.

Think it will have less chance of cracking if it's heated?

Anyone who says bend against the grain will be ignored.
View Quote


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