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Posted: 10/10/2005 12:05:18 PM EDT
Okay, our family dog, a Beagle who we have had for 2 1/2 years bit our 4 year old son in the face yesterday.  He has nipped at him in the past but this time he drew blood and our son needed stitches in his upper lip (they actually glued it).  Now the dog is not aggressive towards anyone else in the family.
 I believe this time it was unprovoked, I know in the past our boy would aggitate the dog but I don't believe he did this time.  Now my wifes reaction was to get rid of the dog, to the point where it is almost a he leaves or I leave scenario.  We have talked about obedience training, however it is a Beagle and I hear they aren't very trainible.  
I wanted to gather your thoughts and suggestions, would you get rid of the dog? How trainible are Beagles, does anyone here have experience with them.  If it were a more aggressive bread I wouldn't hesitate but the dog is loved by everyone and a member of the family.
thanks
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:07:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/10/2005 12:20:01 PM EDT by NimmerMehr]

Originally Posted By glk31:
Okay, our family dog, a Beagle who we have had for 2 1/2 years bit our 4 year old son in the face yesterday.  He has nipped at him in the past but this time he drew blood and our son needed stitches in his upper lip (they actually glued it).  Now the dog is not aggressive towards anyone else in the family.
 I believe this time it was unprovoked, I know in the past our boy would aggitate the dog but I don't believe he did this time.  Now my wifes reaction was to get rid of the dog, to the point where it is almost a he leaves or I leave scenario.  We have talked about obedience training, however it is a Beagle and I hear they aren't very trainible.  
I wanted to gather your thoughts and suggestions, would you get rid of the dog? How trainible are Beagles, does anyone here have experience with them.  If it were a more aggressive bread I wouldn't hesitate but the dog is loved by everyone and a member of the family.
thanks



In Before The a) "Shoot the dog" b) "It is the owners that make a dog bad"
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:08:38 PM EDT
It's a chance one takes with ANY dog, since no matter how trained and/or small they are, they continue to have a wild instinct buried deep inside them.

That said, the dog has proven it's propensity for dangerous behavior. Next time it could be worse, do you want to tell you wife "He could have been trained." over your sons hospital bed?

SSS
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:08:48 PM EDT
sss
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:08:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By glk31:
Okay, our family dog, a Beagle who we have had for 2 1/2 years bit our 4 year old son in the face yesterday.  He has nipped at him in the past but this time he drew blood and our son needed stitches in his upper lip (they actually glued it).  Now the dog is not aggressive towards anyone else in the family.
 I believe this time it was unprovoked, I know in the past our boy would aggitate the dog but I don't believe he did this time.  Now my wifes reaction was to get rid of the dog, to the point where it is almost a he leaves or I leave scenario.  We have talked about obedience training, however it is a Beagle and I hear they aren't very trainible.  
I wanted to gather your thoughts and suggestions, would you get rid of the dog? How trainible are Beagles, does anyone here have experience with them.  If it were a more aggressive bread I wouldn't hesitate but the dog is loved by everyone and a member of the family.
thanks



In Before The a) "Shoot the dog" b) "It is the owners that make a dog bad"


HUH?
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:10:40 PM EDT
Looks like th dog sees your son as a threat or competition.  

He's confused about his place in the back.

Not a dog I'd have around.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:11:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By glk31:

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By glk31:
Okay, our family dog, a Beagle who we have had for 2 1/2 years bit our 4 year old son in the face yesterday.  He has nipped at him in the past but this time he drew blood and our son needed stitches in his upper lip (they actually glued it).  Now the dog is not aggressive towards anyone else in the family.
 I believe this time it was unprovoked, I know in the past our boy would aggitate the dog but I don't believe he did this time.  Now my wifes reaction was to get rid of the dog, to the point where it is almost a he leaves or I leave scenario.  We have talked about obedience training, however it is a Beagle and I hear they aren't very trainible.  
I wanted to gather your thoughts and suggestions, would you get rid of the dog? How trainible are Beagles, does anyone here have experience with them.  If it were a more aggressive bread I wouldn't hesitate but the dog is loved by everyone and a member of the family.
thanks



In Before The a) "Shoot the dog" b) "It is the owners that make a dog bad"


HUH?



He is saying that this will go 15 pages and have a mix of people saying Shoot the dog, and people saying your a bad owner and thats why the dog did it.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:13:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:

Originally Posted By glk31:

Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By glk31:
Okay, our family dog, a Beagle who we have had for 2 1/2 years bit our 4 year old son in the face yesterday.  He has nipped at him in the past but this time he drew blood and our son needed stitches in his upper lip (they actually glued it).  Now the dog is not aggressive towards anyone else in the family.
 I believe this time it was unprovoked, I know in the past our boy would aggitate the dog but I don't believe he did this time.  Now my wifes reaction was to get rid of the dog, to the point where it is almost a he leaves or I leave scenario.  We have talked about obedience training, however it is a Beagle and I hear they aren't very trainible.  
I wanted to gather your thoughts and suggestions, would you get rid of the dog? How trainible are Beagles, does anyone here have experience with them.  If it were a more aggressive bread I wouldn't hesitate but the dog is loved by everyone and a member of the family.
thanks



In Before The a) "Shoot the dog" b) "It is the owners that make a dog bad"


HUH?



He is saying that this will go 15 pages and have a mix of people saying Shoot the dog, and people saying your a bad owner and thats why the dog did it.

gotcha
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:13:15 PM EDT
Get rid of the dog.

If he bites another family member, perhaps causing permanent scarring or vision loss, you will never forgive yourself.

If he bites a stranger, your hospital bill from getting your son's lip glued back together will be evidence of your knowledge of the dog's propensity to viciousness and you'll lose everything you own.

The last dog bite case my law office did was horrific.  Little girl actually had an eyeball punctured, lost sight, and permanant scarring.

Settlement negotiations started at a quarter of a million dollars, and that was their offer not our demand.  

Get rid of the dog.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:14:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/10/2005 12:18:07 PM EDT by MST2]

Originally Posted By glk31:
Okay, our family dog, a Beagle who we have had for 2 1/2 years bit our 4 year old son in the face yesterday.  He has nipped at him in the past but this time he drew blood and our son needed stitches in his upper lip (they actually glued it).  Now the dog is not aggressive towards anyone else in the family.
 I believe this time it was unprovoked, I know in the past our boy would aggitate the dog but I don't believe he did this time.  Now my wifes reaction was to get rid of the dog, to the point where it is almost a he leaves or I leave scenario.  We have talked about obedience training, however it is a Beagle and I hear they aren't very trainible.  
I wanted to gather your thoughts and suggestions, would you get rid of the dog? How trainible are Beagles, does anyone here have experience with them.  If it were a more aggressive bread I wouldn't hesitate but the dog is loved by everyone and a member of the family.
thanks




What the fuck is wrong with you?!!!!!   I would have broke that dogs fucking neck with my bare hands ASAP!!!


My family German Shepard got away from me the other day, and bit a neighbor boy, since I live on a military base, it was all I could do not to take it out back and put a bullet in her head. Luckily a friend took her off my hands. The little boy wasnt hurt. Just a real good pinch mark, barely drew blood. But there was no damn reason for my dog to do that.

What if it had been your childs eye or it permanently scarred your child? You shouldnt even be questioning yourself on this.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:15:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/10/2005 12:16:22 PM EDT by sgthoskins]

Originally Posted By mcculver5:
Looks like th dog sees your son as a threat or competition.  

He's confused about his place in the back.

Not a dog I'd have around.



+1 He probably is jealous of the attention your son gets, and is trying to stake his claim in the pecking order with your son.

ETA: The behavior probably won't change.  Look for a new home for the pooch.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:17:55 PM EDT
When it comes to the family, if the dog bites it dies.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:18:40 PM EDT
My parents had a beagle that acted like that towards my wife.  The thing would actually act that way towards women in general.  I told them that when we came to visit the dog was gonna live outside.  They had another beagle that was a gentle as can be.  Neither one graduated obedience school.  In fact the nice one was not able to finish.  The nice one died of old age the mean one ran away and was run over.  Long story short, As much as I love my dog, I'd get rid of it.  They don't get better.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:21:57 PM EDT
Lose the dog.

As others have said, dogs are a pack animal.  They need to know their place in the pack, yours doesn't.  And it he's nipped your son before, for ANY reason, he certainly doesn't know his place.  Family members of the owner./master do NOT earn nips by messing with the dog, it needs to know its place.

This bite proves all dogs MAY bite at one time or another, as others have also said, training is good, but can't erase the fact that 10,000 generation ago, they were wolves/predators.  

I've handled a handful of dog bite legal cases.  You want to know the one common denominator?

EVERY one, every single owner said the same thing:  I didn't think he would ever bite anyone.  He never bit anyone before.  

I have always had dogs, big ones, Rotts, Weimaraeners (SP spasm).  I don't trust dogs.  I don't fear them, either, but I don't trust them.  Especially with little kids.

Yours has earned your distrust.  It WILL bite again, probably your son.

Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:22:07 PM EDT
I have trained a few different breeds and here it is. A jealous issue and a dominance issue. Not the kids fault ,not your fault, not the dogs fault. They are wired like that. Find him a good home with a great family and get another puppy.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:22:55 PM EDT
Some dogs have trouble with small children. Whenever we have family bring over their kids, our dog gets put in the garage. We had a close call one time when my 4yo cousin ran up to our lab/german shepard and put his arms around her midsection, this startled the dog and it freaked as it was unaccustomed to that type of contact. Small children do not know the danger a dog can be to them, and do not know how far they can go before they get bit. Keep medium and big dogs away from kids, its that simple. Of course, some little inbred, psychotic toy dog rat could bite the hell out of a kid too
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:24:34 PM EDT
I have seen the same pattern in other Beagles. IMO, they are not the smartest breed and not the best with kids. Smaller than average dogs in general are not the best for kids, IMO.

If it was just you and the wife and the dog had drawn blood on you then I would go with sticking it out and going to training.

If the dog draws blood on a child that is not an accident or extreme circumstances, then the dog goes. If it happened once, it will happen again before you get it under control.

If I were you, I would start over with another dog perhaps from another breed. If you have small kids then "good with kids" should be at the top of your requirements.

Personally, I have never owned a dog that would bite a child. Our family dogs would always take pretty much unlimited abuse from small children without fighting back. From what I saw, the dogs regarded themselves as family members and had the same attitudes toward small children that the adults did. In some cases, it was very clear that some of the dogs regarded some babies as "their" baby and would go through all the motions of parental babysitting. They didn't care what abuse they took from kids, they loved the kids and were willing to lay down their lives for them, if need be. Besides, overall, they really loved most of what the kids did to them. They enjoyed the interaction, even if they got poked in the eye or their tail stepped on once in a while.

That's the attitude I look for in a dog.

Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:26:43 PM EDT
shoot the dog before your wife shoots you.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:27:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jcncc:
I have trained a few different breeds and here it is. A jealous issue and a dominance issue. Not the kids fault ,not your fault, not the dogs fault. They are wired like that. Find him a good home with a great family and get another puppy.



Agreed!
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:27:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:27:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/10/2005 12:28:14 PM EDT by Alien]
You'd do best to get rid of the dog. It's better safe than sorry, both physically for your son or another child and your wallet.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:33:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/10/2005 12:35:30 PM EDT by MST2]
If you keep that dog, you sir, will be a fucking moron.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:34:00 PM EDT
Find the dog a good home.  You will never forgiveyourself if something happens to your kids.  Find another dog to replace this one.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:34:35 PM EDT
your kid or the dog?

sounds like an easy choice to me
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:35:32 PM EDT
I love dogs man...but why are you even posting this?

Dump the pooch. Trainable or not...he don't like kids and you can't fix that unless you're an animal behaviourist...which I'm sure you're not.

I know it's hard to do, and you want to believe the best about the dog...but is it worth then next bite when your child loses an eye? Or the dog bites one of the kids friends and now you get sued off the planet?

Search the internet for Beagle rescue and give him up that way. Humane society has a very low tolerance for biters so that's a death sentence.

This sucks...but maybe a different breed dog will be better for you guys once thoe pooch is gone. A nice golden Retriever or something that loves kids.

Sorry man...but what's more important...the dog or your family?

Kurt "Been there...done that" Austin
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:38:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/10/2005 12:39:01 PM EDT by jimtash9]
The dog bit your son in the face because that's how dogs establish dominance over one another and it also might have percieved your son as doing something wrong and "punished" it so to speak. He doesn't do it to anyone else because he know his place but your son is still considered to be below him and he will keep biting until you show your dog that he's the low man on the totem pole in your family. Next time he tries it, grab him by the snout and tell him no and keep repeating it and clamp down hard. You'll see the fear in those eyes and he won't do it again. And don't worry about the biting because it's just a natural instinct and once you show that your son is above him, that should cure it of it's tendency to do it.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:40:15 PM EDT
It is far too late for obedience school to make a difference.

We had a dog that attempted to push my toddler down the steps behind our house.  Not playing around.

Smart little mutt figured he could get rid of the competition.

Sold him off and he is happy with someone who has grown children.

Considering adopting a greyhound, though.  Just gotta get the fence installed.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:41:26 PM EDT
Dogs are teh suck. I don't understand their appeal.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:42:25 PM EDT
It's given you its warning already.

The dog isn't a friend.  It isn't a family member.  It is an animal with thousands of years of instincts.  Never forget that.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:43:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By glk31:
Okay, our family dog, a Beagle who we have had for 2 1/2 years bit our 4 year old son in the face yesterday.  He has nipped at him in the past but this time he drew blood and our son needed stitches in his upper lip (they actually glued it).  Now the dog is not aggressive towards anyone else in the family.
 I believe this time it was unprovoked, I know in the past our boy would aggitate the dog but I don't believe he did this time.  Now my wifes reaction was to get rid of the dog, to the point where it is almost a he leaves or I leave scenario.  We have talked about obedience training, however it is a Beagle and I hear they aren't very trainible.  
I wanted to gather your thoughts and suggestions, would you get rid of the dog? How trainible are Beagles, does anyone here have experience with them.  If it were a more aggressive bread I wouldn't hesitate but the dog is loved by everyone and a member of the family.
thanks



Dog is not the problem here.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:43:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jimtash9:
The dog bit your son in the face because that's how dogs establish dominance over one another and it also might have percieved your son as doing something wrong and "punished" it so to speak. He doesn't do it to anyone else because he know his place but your son is still considered to be below him and he will keep biting until you show your dog that he's the low man on the totem pole in your family. Next time he tries it, grab him by the snout and tell him no and keep repeating it and clamp down hard. You'll see the fear in those eyes and he won't do it again. And don't worry about the biting because it's just a natural instinct and once you show that your son is above him, that should cure it of it's tendency to do it.



A VOICE OF REASON.  

at last.  it's a dog.  you have to teach it how to do a lot of things including socialize it with the family.  don't dump it the first time it makes a mistake.  this is a dog not a running chainsaw.
if you don't teach this dog you will have to teach the next one.  
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:49:03 PM EDT
+
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 12:49:43 PM EDT
Kids agitate dogs.  They are small and can be misclassified as subordinates by dogs.

Dogs need to be trained.  I'd put some time towards proper PROFESSIONAL training.  I would then see if the dog regresses.  If you "test" him and he still snips at your son, then the dog goes to the SPCA.

A dog can be trained at any age.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:00:10 PM EDT
yeah, keep the dog, if it takes out your kids eyes during the "training period", you can always go get new ones at the local eye store.
Not a big deal, if your kid does not mind being blind for the rest of his life.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:01:03 PM EDT
Pooch dies.  
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:02:46 PM EDT
dogs have an incredible memory.  Anyone who has ever abused a dog the dog will never fully trust.  This is one reason if you have an animal.  ALL animals are wild no matter how tame you think they are.  If humans are not in control and masters all the time bad things can happen.

Sounds like your dog took advantage of a situation.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:03:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hk940:

Originally Posted By jimtash9:
The dog bit your son in the face because that's how dogs establish dominance over one another and it also might have percieved your son as doing something wrong and "punished" it so to speak. He doesn't do it to anyone else because he know his place but your son is still considered to be below him and he will keep biting until you show your dog that he's the low man on the totem pole in your family. Next time he tries it, grab him by the snout and tell him no and keep repeating it and clamp down hard. You'll see the fear in those eyes and he won't do it again. And don't worry about the biting because it's just a natural instinct and once you show that your son is above him, that should cure it of it's tendency to do it.



A VOICE OF REASON.  

at last.  it's a dog.  you have to teach it how to do a lot of things including socialize it with the family.  don't dump it the first time it makes a mistake.  this is a dog not a running chainsaw.
if you don't teach this dog you will have to teach the next one.  



If the dog is over two years old and hasn't learned that by now, then it has earned the ticket to the exit in my house. I am not teaching stuff that basic at this late date.

I really don't understand a lot of this talk about needing to establish dominance over family dogs. I have never done any special dominance training over dogs and never had any dominance problems. Quite the contrary. My dogs will take orders from a two-year-old.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:04:40 PM EDT
If it were me, I'd take the old fella out back and put him down easy.

It's a shitty thing to do, but you're screwed both ways.  Can't keep it, but you don't want to loose him.  

Bottom line: It could be worse, and it can get much worse if he sticks around.  Get rid of him somehow.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:07:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/10/2005 1:09:00 PM EDT by FortyFiveAutomatic]

Originally Posted By hk940:

Originally Posted By jimtash9:
The dog bit your son in the face because that's how dogs establish dominance over one another and it also might have percieved your son as doing something wrong and "punished" it so to speak. He doesn't do it to anyone else because he know his place but your son is still considered to be below him and he will keep biting until you show your dog that he's the low man on the totem pole in your family. Next time he tries it, grab him by the snout and tell him no and keep repeating it and clamp down hard. You'll see the fear in those eyes and he won't do it again. And don't worry about the biting because it's just a natural instinct and once you show that your son is above him, that should cure it of it's tendency to do it.



A VOICE OF REASON.  

at last.  it's a dog.  you have to teach it how to do a lot of things including socialize it with the family.  don't dump it the first time it makes a mistake.  this is a dog not a running chainsaw.
if you don't teach this dog you will have to teach the next one.  



No disrespect, but that's not reason, that's pretty retarded.  "Next time he tries it"?  Next time he can permanently disfigure your boy.  The dog may not be too old to teach, but why take the risk?  

Better to teach the next one, early this time, rather than take the risk of recidivism on the dog's part.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:10:52 PM EDT
Any dog that bites my kid and draws blood will cease to live. And we do have a dog. She has been trained from a pup to be around the kids.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:12:57 PM EDT
I think everyone is telling you that the real title of this thread ought to be "What dog should I get next?"

I can think of two that are known to be good with kids. Black Russian Terrier and Shiloh Shepherd. Both may be bigger than what you want.

Other suggestions?
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:13:35 PM EDT
You should have got rid of it the first time he "nipped".


  SSS
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:13:35 PM EDT
Was the kid teasing the dog? I've seen so many dogs bite due to kids teasing them.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:16:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gsiebrecht:
yeah, keep the dog, if it takes out your kids eyes during the "training period", you can always go get new ones at the local eye store.
Not a big deal, if your kid does not mind being blind for the rest of his life.



Heaven forbid you act like an adult and supervise your child....right?



Maybe you aren't capable of thinking through a solution, but you can always keep the dog away from the child while it's being trained / re-trained.

My reaction may have been different had the dog viciously attacked the kid and ripped his scalp off, and pulled his eyes out, and bit of his tongue.  However, that didn't happen.

The dog sounds like it reacted with a nip.  Dogs teeth are harder than child's skin.  Child's skin loses.

We attempt to train dog.  With a make shift quarantine.

If dog fails follow-up testing, dog is gone.

Look!  An adult plan, with adult goals and objectives.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:17:41 PM EDT
Sounds like the dog has to go - the problem you're currently having is happening because you didn't beat the dog's ass the FIRST time he showed ANY agressive behavior towards a member of your family - ESPECIALLY a small child...



 - georgestrings
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:19:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FortyFiveAutomatic:

Originally Posted By hk940:

Originally Posted By jimtash9:
The dog bit your son in the face because that's how dogs establish dominance over one another and it also might have percieved your son as doing something wrong and "punished" it so to speak. He doesn't do it to anyone else because he know his place but your son is still considered to be below him and he will keep biting until you show your dog that he's the low man on the totem pole in your family. Next time he tries it, grab him by the snout and tell him no and keep repeating it and clamp down hard. You'll see the fear in those eyes and he won't do it again. And don't worry about the biting because it's just a natural instinct and once you show that your son is above him, that should cure it of it's tendency to do it.



A VOICE OF REASON.  

at last.  it's a dog.  you have to teach it how to do a lot of things including socialize it with the family.  don't dump it the first time it makes a mistake.  this is a dog not a running chainsaw.
if you don't teach this dog you will have to teach the next one.  



No disrespect, but that's not reason, that's pretty retarded.  "Next time he tries it"?  Next time he can permanently disfigure your boy.  The dog may not be too old to teach, but why take the risk?  

Better to teach the next one, early this time, rather than take the risk of recidivism on the dog's part.



you know a cat can scratch the shit out of a child and most folks say it's just a cat.
a dog nipps at you and your ready to sell it off or gas it.  he could not have trained the dog before as there was no child before.  the dog was the child.  now the dog is confused and just needs a little more training.  and yes.  you can train a 2 year old dog.  will he nip the boy again?  i don't know.  will a new puppy nip the boy.  yes.  i can guarantee it will and those milk teeth are a lot sharper than a big dog.  plus you have to retrain the new dog everything.  the dog you have just needs a little "adjustment"  not a full engine rebuild.  
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:19:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KWB52:
Was the kid teasing the dog? I've seen so many dogs bite due to kids teasing them.



Absolutely no excuse. The dog should know better. My dogs have let kids whack them, poke them, jump on their ribs, and everything else without doing anything but getting out of the way.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:21:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By wolfman97:

Originally Posted By KWB52:
Was the kid teasing the dog? I've seen so many dogs bite due to kids teasing them.



Absolutely no excuse. The dog should know better. My dogs have let kids whack them, poke them, jump on their ribs, and everything else without doing anything but getting out of the way.


Sucks to be one of your dogs



Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:22:00 PM EDT
"I believe this time it was unprovoked, I know in the past our boy would aggitate the dog but I don't believe he did this time."


It also sounds like you need to teach your child not to be mean to animals, now that I think of it...



   - georgestrings
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:22:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SHIVAN:

Heaven forbid you act like an adult and supervise your child....right?



Because trying to provoke the mutt into nipping the kid again is such a great idea aswell.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:22:58 PM EDT
It amazes me how many people are ready to execute the family pet over a minor nip.

When I was about ten years old, my beagle nipped my arm in a moment of confusion a left a small scar. Not once did my family consider taking him out back and shooting him. The dog was punished and never again bit anyone. He did however chase a neighbor child out of the path of a car and was hit himself in the process. He also fought off a stray chow twice his size that tried to attack my little sister.

That little guy was my best friend until he died last year at 16 years old.

If all people and all dogs were shot when they made a mistake, there would be a hell of a lot more dogs than people on this planet.
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