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Posted: 11/28/2007 6:02:00 AM EDT
Does anyone know of a standard or accepted practices for Ethernet cable colors.
I'm not talking about the pinouts but the jacket color of the cable.
For example:
Yellow=Routers
Orange=Crossover
Blue=Data
White=Phone
something like that.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 6:37:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/28/2007 2:02:40 PM EDT by dizza]
I don't believe there is any standard for that. In all of the installs I've done, we just get whatever colors we want and go for it. We use our nifty little labeler to mark the ones going to servers and network devices.

-d
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 6:49:30 AM EDT
if there is a standard i would love to know about it, but we just choose whatever blows our skirt up on that particular job
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 6:49:31 AM EDT
Just agree on a color scheme that makes sense to your organization and go with that.

Labeler's are standard practice but it's nice to be able to look at the backs of racks and inside IDF/MDF's and just know which cables are servicing which devices.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 6:53:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/29/2007 9:57:54 AM EDT by millsusaf]
tag, I have a nice jpeg that will help you out with this!


http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h176/millsusaf/Misc/rad5F2E2_crossover.jpg
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 6:57:15 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 7:03:10 AM EDT
No standard but some places will choose colors based on what network, traffic, or systems are hooked to it. Red can mean network backbones, blue are servers, yellow workstations, etc. Use whatever you like to identify the different aspects of your network. I haven't really run into many places that actually color code like that.

-Foxxz
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 7:05:50 AM EDT
No common standards, just make an enterprise standard and stick to it.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 7:06:08 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 7:09:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By millsusaf:
tag, I have a nice jpeg that will help you out with this!



CHRIS
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 7:15:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Cixelsyd:

Originally Posted By millsusaf:
tag, I have a nice jpeg that will help you out with this!

img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/Chrissopher/yellow_wall.jpg

CHRIS


Looks like the Merrifield VA post office patch rack.

This is what I use:

RED - Critical connections - Routers Servers Gateways

Yellow - Critical Network Segment Connections - hubs switches, by floor or building

Blue - workstation patch cords - 10-15-20 ft

Link Posted: 11/28/2007 7:20:12 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 7:26:34 AM EDT
I got that in an email a while back.

In the Army we used red for SIPR and blue for EVERYTHING else. I think that's the only Black-box part #'s supply knew.

In Afghanistan with ITT it was similar. Red for secure, white for foreign national stuff, and blue for all else.

CHRIS
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 2:59:25 PM EDT

ive never been able to find any type of universally accepted standard. the enterprise/organization usually defines its own..or not. personally, i tend to match the intensity of the color to the cable's significance and class of connection. currently, i have red, yellow, green, white, blue and then purple for phone/voip. i tend to be a more visual person, so i like being able to look at an installation and know almost instantly what is going on. i've also found having some type of color code is quite helpful when giving instructions to "outsiders" or for troubleshooting - especially if i need to do so remotely. for that same reason, i also assign every cable a unique identifier and have that identifier taped at each end.

the only thing i don't like about this is that it theoretically could make it easier for someone to maliciously disrupt the system. i guess everyone has to decide their own level of comfort with such things.

Link Posted: 11/28/2007 4:04:26 PM EDT
There is no standard which designates jacket color, as many have noted. The closest notion is that of color coding for cross-connect fields, per ANSI/TIA/EIA-606-A, Administrative Standard for Commercial Telecommunications Infrastructure. These are:

-Orange - Demarcation points
-Green - Network Connections
-Purple - Common equipment (connections to PBX)
-White - First level backbone
-Gray - Second-level backbone
-Blue - Horizontal cabling (cabling distributed to the outlet)
-Brown - Interbuilding backbone
-Yellow - Miscellaneous (alarm, security)
-Red - future use

Acceptable methods for color coding cross-connect fields include the use of colored backboards, connections, covers or labels.


(Source: Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual, 10th Ed. BICSI Press, 2004.)


-Blake
BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designer
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 4:23:35 PM EDT
The color thats costs less is what gets used.
Link Posted: 11/28/2007 4:55:48 PM EDT
We use the following.

Green - Servers
Yellow - Infrastructure Switches and Routers
Blue - Workstations (patch panels and in the walls)
Putty - Outdoor rated gel filled (nasty stuff) usually running to microwave links

No real standard but it works for us.
Link Posted: 11/29/2007 7:08:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Cixelsyd:

img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/Chrissopher/yellow_wall.jpg

CHRIS


Holy Crap!

Thanks for the pic. I just sent it to one of our Data Comm guys at work. Thank goodness they don't do work like that!
Link Posted: 11/29/2007 7:17:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Cixelsyd:

Originally Posted By millsusaf:
tag, I have a nice jpeg that will help you out with this!

img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/Chrissopher/yellow_wall.jpg

CHRIS


I've seen fiber patch panels that look nearly that bad, and they were in major telephone company buildings.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 1:53:44 PM EDT
When it comes to the bulk box stuff, the common colors I've experienced were blue for data and white for phone. I hated doing projects at smaller places that used whatever color the electrician had at the time when they installed wall jacks. They'd be blue in one room, orange in another, or a variety, and you couldn't tell if it was data or phone unless it was live and patched in.

The places that needed the most help didn't have the money to fix the problem, otherwise they would've been more organized and done it right.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 2:25:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/3/2007 2:37:53 PM EDT by bchapman]
Originally Posted By Moondog:
When it comes to the bulk box stuff, the common colors I've experienced were blue for data and white for phone. I hated doing projects at smaller places that used whatever color the electrician had at the time when they installed wall jacks. They'd be blue in one room, orange in another, or a variety, and you couldn't tell if it was data or phone unless it was live and patched in.

The places that needed the most help didn't have the money to fix the problem, otherwise they would've been more organized and done it right.

----------


Bingo. When contracting an electrician or a datacom firm, specify the material to use. If it's a plenum environment, tell them. If it's a Cat5e network, don't allow for any portion to be of lesser grade, ex: "Cat 5" jacks, patch panels, etc. Specify exactly what you want - like "Superior Essex Cat5e riser cabling in blue, Leviton Cat5e jacks in light almond". Furthermore, insist your circuits are certified. This can quickly reduce variables in what's wrong with your network. Saving a few dollars with the low-ball firm WILL cost more than doing it right the first time.
Link Posted: 12/3/2007 2:40:41 PM EDT
We had one guy bring a bunch of young pup apprentices on a wiring job, and had him promise if they screwed anything up, he'd personally fix it himself. After the first day he replaced half of the guys on the crew with more seasoned guys. After awhile he became very skiddish whenever we approached him, expecting us to point out another mistake by his guys. I'd let him know that we did appreciate him backing up his guys work though.
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