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Posted: 7/3/2013 6:12:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2013 11:34:21 AM EST by gmtech825]
so I currently hate my profession and don't see it getting any better. I have always wanted to be an engineering but just really hate school and haven't had the money for it anyways. I'm coming up on 25 next month and am thinking that it's now or never if I'm going to do this. i guess my plan would be to try and find a program that allows me to attend online or at night (like i said i'm poor and need to keep working to pay bills)

is this a good field to get in to? (I know it's a broad question) Is it secure and can it pay well? any online programs out there you can recommend? I'm nervous as hell to get this ball rolling for the fear of investing money with out it paying off. I just can't imagine working on cars for the rest of my life.

thanks for any input at all, and...

FBHO



update for those who missed my other post: I've decided to go to school full time for engineering next fall and work on some math classes before that.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:17:47 PM EST

The company I work for has been hiring young engineers left and right...
It has great opportunities but they spend more time doing project management than actual engineering.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:18:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/3/2013 6:20:14 PM EST by Bushamster21]
It takes a lot of work to get there and an aptitude for it. As for job security, I wouldn't worry too much about it, it's in pretty high demand.

FWIW I'm still a student, but I am an intern for a company and we build forends, barrels, and a couple different accessories. It isn't too bad. Boring sometimes but otherwise it's cool seeing something go from start to finish and knowing you had a hand in it.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:19:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/3/2013 6:22:21 PM EST by M4tty]
I am in somewhat of a similar predicament and I find this intriguing but like you I haven't made any leaps yet.

In for info and opinions.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:23:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bushamster21:
It takes a lot of work to get there and an aptitude for it. As for job security, I wouldn't worry too much about it, it's in pretty high demand.

FWIW I'm still a student, but I am an intern for a company and we build forends, barrels, and a couple different accessories. It isn't too bad. Boring sometimes but otherwise it's cool seeing something go from start to finish and knowing you had a hand in it.


i have the drive and brain power, just not the financial security to do it. the only good thing about my job right now is that its pretty recession-proof. I may have times where i make much less money, but i won't be laid off.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:24:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
really hate school


Giant red flag. It's endless problem sets. If you can't put up with that you'l be miserable.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:25:02 PM EST

People don’t make it through E-school because they were looking for something better. It chews up & spits out very intelligent individuals that ‘always wanted to be an Engineer’. Just a caution. Decide what you truly wish to do with your life, and then put a plan together to make it happen.

Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:25:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By Hollands1:

The company I work for has been hiring young engineers left and right...
It has great opportunities but they spend more time doing project management than actual engineering.


I agree with this. It seems like lately I have been doing more and more pm work. I actually look forward to the middle of the night change control windows now. Today we had one of our more "critical" access switches go belly up and we ended up having the majority of the senior engineers on site helping swap hardware. They all said that it was a nice change compared to sitting in the cubical all day.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:26:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By mcgredo:
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
really hate school


Giant red flag. It's endless problem sets. If you can't put up with that you'l be miserable.


+1

College could be a pain in the ass sometimes, but I always enjoyed it because of the challenges and my drive to learn. As an engineer, those two things are really the only things that keep me going.

Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:28:14 PM EST
Originally Posted By sbl23:
Originally Posted By Hollands1:

The company I work for has been hiring young engineers left and right...
It has great opportunities but they spend more time doing project management than actual engineering.


I agree with this. It seems like lately I have been doing more and more pm work. I actually look forward to the middle of the night change control windows now. Today we had one of our more "critical" access switches go belly up and we ended up having the majority of the senior engineers on site helping swap hardware. They all said that it was a nice change compared to sitting in the cubical all day.


I would LOVE to do both engineering and physical work. I grew up busting my ass in construction. Now I sit in a cube all day. If I could get a job where I did both it'd be pretty sweet.

Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:28:30 PM EST
Don't think it's certain that you'll be doing engineering work......as mentioned above, chances are you'll be managing projects and the business while software does the engineering.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:28:57 PM EST
You need to be good at Math. Bottom line. If you suck at it right now, start working at it. As far as job outlook, it's fucking great, but mainly if you learn a CAD program like autocad, solidworks, unigraphics, inventor, etc.

There are online training programs for just those cad programs, and certifications to help you stand out. Also, go to a two year tech school for your desired field. Online only schools are garbage. Take night classes. You may have a class here or there that just won't fit. Usually prof will let you do those online. But you'll need hands on instruction in person.

Salary depends on location really. Also, if you're a mechanic, you know cars. Get into an auto mfg factory as a line worker while doing your eng degree. Once you're done they will likely promote you to a better position and can work as an assistant to experienced engineers.

Also, don't be a douche. Can't stand douchey engineers.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:30:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/3/2013 6:31:10 PM EST by tcrpe]
Originally Posted By mcgredo:
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
really hate school


Giant red flag. It's endless problem sets. If you can't put up with that you'l be miserable.


I agree with this. A lot of abstract mathematics.

Been there, done that.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:30:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By mcgredo:
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
really hate school


Giant red flag. It's endless problem sets. If you can't put up with that you'l be miserable.


i don't like school. but I'm good at it. i received an associates degree with a 3.9 GPA. without to much stress. that doesn't sound fun though
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:31:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By 245PDG:

People don’t make it through E-school because they were looking for something better. It chews up & spits out very intelligent individuals that ‘always wanted to be an Engineer’. Just a caution. Decide what you truly wish to do with your life, and then put a plan together to make it happen.



I am one of the spat out.


Are you good at math, OP? Like read calculus books for fun and to correct mistakes good?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:32:25 PM EST
Some tips

1.) If your haven't done math in 6-7 years is would be best to brush up on it. You will most likely take a placement exam if you didn't do well that's fine better to grind your way to the calc/diff eq then to think your great and fall on your face in calc.

2.) Khan Academy is the bomb

3.) You will either learn math like your a cram school Chinese student or you will have to GRIND it out and spend 2+ hours per class day to study.

4.) If your working full time or math is just hard better to take 1-2 classes and FOCUS on them then take 4 and fail 50%

/fin
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:33:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By mp9fan:
You need to be good at Math. Bottom line. If you suck at it right now, start working at it. As far as job outlook, it's fucking great, but mainly if you learn a CAD program like autocad, solidworks, unigraphics, inventor, etc.

There are online training programs for just those cad programs, and certifications to help you stand out. Also, go to a two year tech school for your desired field. Online only schools are garbage. Take night classes. You may have a class here or there that just won't fit. Usually prof will let you do those online. But you'll need hands on instruction in person.

Salary depends on location really. Also, if you're a mechanic, you know cars. Get into an auto mfg factory as a line worker while doing your eng degree. Once you're done they will likely promote you to a better position and can work as an assistant to experienced engineers.

Also, don't be a douche. Can't stand douchey engineers.


heh, me either. some think they know EVERYTHING about ANYTHING
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:34:18 PM EST
In genera,l it's a good field. In general, engineering pays well and is secure. Better answers could be given if you specify a specific field of study and the region in which you plan to seek employment.

Look into community or junior college for basic course work. It will be cheaper. I'd also recommend finding a program you like and figuring out a way to transfer into it after some time at community college. You'll learn a lot more actually being in class. I know computer simulations are great these days but it isn't a substitute for actually being in a lab and putting your hands on the instruments.

It's tough but it's doable. I decided to go back for a EE degree at 30. In a few weeks I'll finally graduate. I was lucky, UM-St. Louis has an evening engineering program, otherwise I'd never have been able to pull it off. I could keep advancing in my current career and the company has even paid for most of it.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:34:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By Rustler:
Originally Posted By sbl23:
Originally Posted By Hollands1:

The company I work for has been hiring young engineers left and right...
It has great opportunities but they spend more time doing project management than actual engineering.


I agree with this. It seems like lately I have been doing more and more pm work. I actually look forward to the middle of the night change control windows now. Today we had one of our more "critical" access switches go belly up and we ended up having the majority of the senior engineers on site helping swap hardware. They all said that it was a nice change compared to sitting in the cubical all day.


I would LOVE to do both engineering and physical work. I grew up busting my ass in construction. Now I sit in a cube all day. If I could get a job where I did both it'd be pretty sweet.



Early in my career I got to do both design work & manufacturing/testing support in the aircraft industry. It could be tough at times but I had a lot of fun getting hands on with problems and actually seeing my designs manufactured. Sitting in airports & meetings sucks a big one.

Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:35:30 PM EST
Are you Indian or some Asian heritage?

Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:35:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By KillerTux:
Some tips

1.) If your haven't done math in 6-7 years is would be best to brush up on it. You will most likely take a placement exam if you didn't do well that's fine better to grind your way to the calc/diff eq then to think your great and fall on your face in calc.

2.) Khan Academy is the bomb

3.) You will either learn math like your a cram school Chinese student or you will have to GRIND it out and spend 2+ hours per class day to study.

4.) If your working full time or math is just hard better to take 1-2 classes and FOCUS on them then take 4 and fail 50%

/fin


well i was thinking of stretching it out over 4 or 5 years so could focus and do better, thanks

Originally Posted By MoparMike:
Originally Posted By 245PDG:

People don’t make it through E-school because they were looking for something better. It chews up & spits out very intelligent individuals that ‘always wanted to be an Engineer’. Just a caution. Decide what you truly wish to do with your life, and then put a plan together to make it happen.



I am one of the spat out.


Are you good at math, OP? Like read calculus books for fun and to correct mistakes good?

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


damn, definitely not that good at math.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:35:51 PM EST
Take Trig & Calc classes at your local community college. If you can stomach that and get good grades, transfer your credits to a university. While you're at the CC, might as well save a few bucks and get all the bullshit classes out of the way like Health 101, some language, misc. useless bullshit you took in high school, and as many math classes the university you want to attend will allow. Not a bad idea to take a CAD class or learn your way around a machine shop. Knowing how to weld, CNC, and other special skills will put you a couple steps a head of other grads who have no skills...only grades.

If you fuck up, no big deal; you're out a couple hundred bucks. Fuck up a year at a university and you pissed away $10 grand.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:36:34 PM EST
Originally Posted By mp9fan:
You need to be good at Math. Bottom line. If you suck at it right now, start working at it. As far as job outlook, it's fucking great, but mainly if you learn a CAD program like autocad, solidworks, unigraphics, inventor, etc.

There are online training programs for just those cad programs, and certifications to help you stand out. Also, go to a two year tech school for your desired field. Online only schools are garbage. Take night classes. You may have a class here or there that just won't fit. Usually prof will let you do those online. But you'll need hands on instruction in person.

Salary depends on location really. Also, if you're a mechanic, you know cars. Get into an auto mfg factory as a line worker while doing your eng degree. Once you're done they will likely promote you to a better position and can work as an assistant to experienced engineers.

Also, don't be a douche. Can't stand douchey engineers.


My boss taught himself how to use solidworks and OneCNC purely by using the tutorials they offer with the program. No certifications. Nothing. He has experienced machinists handle any sort of bugs once they reach a sort of final prototype phase.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:37:34 PM EST
Originally Posted By Danner130:
Are you Indian or some Asian heritage?



part feather Indian but you wouldn't know it by looking at my skin color
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:40:37 PM EST
What kind of engineer do you want to be? The curriculum varies widely depending on the major.

ME is heavy on math. ChemE is obviously heavy on the the chemistry. EE is full of a bunch of made up nonsense. MinE requires crayons and a bionic liver.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:41:18 PM EST
We are hiring.

As you can see there are 33 engineering jobs available externally. Also, we pay for school... there are some requirements, but we pay for it.

http://dtna.jobs/

I guess it depends if you want to relocate.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:41:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By bngracing:
Take Trig & Calc classes at your local community college. If you can stomach that and get good grades, transfer your credits to a university. While you're at the CC, might as well save a few bucks and get all the bullshit classes out of the way like Health 101, some language, misc. useless bullshit you took in high school, and as many math classes the university you want to attend will allow. Not a bad idea to take a CAD class or learn your way around a machine shop. Knowing how to weld, CNC, and other special skills will put you a couple steps a head of other grads who have no skills...only grades.

If you fuck up, no big deal; you're out a couple hundred bucks. Fuck up a year at a university and you pissed away $10 grand.


this sounds like good advice, thank you. if i remember correctly most classes at the local CC are $500-$700
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:43:29 PM EST
Originally Posted By sd_norske:
What kind of engineer do you want to be? The curriculum varies widely depending on the major.

ME is heavy on math. ChemE is obviously heavy on the the chemistry. EE is full of a bunch of made up nonsense. MinE requires crayons and a bionic liver.


i was thinking ME or EE. any examples of this made up nonsense?
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:43:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/3/2013 6:46:20 PM EST by Erick123]
My cousin is a petroleum engineer.

He is making some CASH for a 27 year old. He made over 120k a year out of college. He does travel a lot! He is working on rigs on the ocean for months at a time.

If you have the brain for it, do it.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:45:16 PM EST
I got a BSME. It's a fucking hard road, but worth it. There's all kinds of ball buster courses, but if you make sure you understand all of the homework assigned and do the textbook readings you'll come out okay. Probably the hardest part about the problems are setting them up. Like creating equations from the problem statement. Then you'll make sure the number of equations is equal to the number of unknowns and go from there. I'd recommend that you take a few FEA (FEM) classes. I'd also recommend getting a few Solidworks certs (I'm assuming you're wanting to go mechanical). As far as getting internships goes, it really helps if you have "connections". My uncle basically handed me one (he was an executive of an oil company) and I made damn good money. After college, I got hired at a mega corp, but then within two weeks I was transferred to stress analysis, my job title was "Stress Analyst", it wasn't doing any design work, but I was basically dicking around doing Solidworks simulations 7 hours a day until my eyes bled. I did that for two years, until I got a job doing HVAC work in my current state. With it, I started doing design stuff, but my "new found" charisma has lead to me doing more of sales stuff. I make pretty good money now. You'll make damn good money after getting a BS. I got 4 job offers after graduation, and my GPA was below a 3.00, but my job offers were in the $60,000+ a year range, with all kinds of crazy ass benefits. As a general rule of thumb, you'll be making $100k+ a year after 5 years.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:46:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/3/2013 6:47:19 PM EST by Sturmgeist]
Originally Posted By Erick123:
My cousin is a petroleum engineer.

He is making some CASH for a 27 year old. He made over 120k a year out of college. He does travel a lot! He is working on rigs on the ocean for months at a time.

If you have the brain for it, do it.


My uncle made over $8500 a day, before retiring with his petroleum engineering degree.
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:48:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By Rustler:
Originally Posted By sbl23:
Originally Posted By Hollands1:

The company I work for has been hiring young engineers left and right...
It has great opportunities but they spend more time doing project management than actual engineering.


I agree with this. It seems like lately I have been doing more and more pm work. I actually look forward to the middle of the night change control windows now. Today we had one of our more "critical" access switches go belly up and we ended up having the majority of the senior engineers on site helping swap hardware. They all said that it was a nice change compared to sitting in the cubical all day.


I would LOVE to do both engineering and physical work. I grew up busting my ass in construction. Now I sit in a cube all day. If I could get a job where I did both it'd be pretty sweet.

The Truth, here it is.

Unless you can get into petroleum engineering or something like it that will let you go out in the field, it's just another desk job with better pay.

Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:50:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
damn, definitely not that good at math.


I think most engineers take 5 yrs with full class loads. As in 14-16 hours of no bs, kick your ass engineering classes. Part time will take more than a decade of beating your balls with a rock after working a full day at your regular job. I’m a Mechanical Engineer, I could not go back and complete school that way – nope, not even close.

If you want to dip your toe in, go and complete Calculus I-III. Once you are done with that you will know if you want to continue or not so much.

Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:51:26 PM EST
Petroleum engineering. Mucho dinero.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:54:35 PM EST
Originally Posted By Sturmgeist:
Originally Posted By Erick123:
My cousin is a petroleum engineer.

He is making some CASH for a 27 year old. He made over 120k a year out of college. He does travel a lot! He is working on rigs on the ocean for months at a time.

If you have the brain for it, do it.


My uncle made over $8500 a day, before retiring with his petroleum engineering degree.


That is insane!

That had to be awesome!
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 6:59:15 PM EST
well shit, my brain hurts now just from thinking about this stuff.
thanks for the input everyone, it has definitely helped
Link Posted: 7/3/2013 7:15:41 PM EST
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
Originally Posted By sd_norske:
What kind of engineer do you want to be? The curriculum varies widely depending on the major.

ME is heavy on math. ChemE is obviously heavy on the the chemistry. EE is full of a bunch of made up nonsense. MinE requires crayons and a bionic liver.


i was thinking ME or EE. any examples of this made up nonsense?


Electrons and holes. With some things you think about electrons moving through wires. In other things you have to think about holes moving in substances instead. Then there is the imaginary stuff called fields, like electric and magnetic fields.

The letter "i" is generally used for imaginary numbers, but the EEs use the letter "j" instead.

Link Posted: 7/3/2013 9:35:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
Originally Posted By sd_norske:
What kind of engineer do you want to be? The curriculum varies widely depending on the major.

ME is heavy on math. ChemE is obviously heavy on the the chemistry. EE is full of a bunch of made up nonsense. MinE requires crayons and a bionic liver.


i was thinking ME or EE. any examples of this made up nonsense?


Imaginary numbers! The square root of negative one!

Link Posted: 7/6/2013 4:57:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By mcgredo:
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
Originally Posted By sd_norske:
What kind of engineer do you want to be? The curriculum varies widely depending on the major.

ME is heavy on math. ChemE is obviously heavy on the the chemistry. EE is full of a bunch of made up nonsense. MinE requires crayons and a bionic liver.


i was thinking ME or EE. any examples of this made up nonsense?


Imaginary numbers! The square root of negative one!

http://assets.amuniversal.com/7ce483005e08012ee3bf00163e41dd5b


ahh it all makes sense now.
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 5:18:22 AM EST
i am a civil engineer BSCE'81. Engineers get plenty of job offers when the graduate. I dont even do engineering anymore, i am a sr manager at a consulting co. its just a stepping stone
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 5:25:10 AM EST
so what happens when engineers don't want to be engineers anymore?
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 5:33:29 AM EST
I graduated 4th in my HS class of over 500 kids.

When I went to Georgia Tech my first quarter I made a 2.2 - all C's and a B. I was pretty humbling.

But from there on, I looked at it as a challenge and I said I am going to whip this thing.

What you have to do is "learn" how to learn the engineering way. Calculus is embedded in every course. So you have to get that shit down pat early on.

Once you got that part figured out, its just a matter of doing the work - going to class, doing the homework and taking all the damn tests.

you basically cant slide / get by in engineering school - you will fail and get weeded out
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 5:35:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By staringback05:
so what happens when engineers don't want to be engineers anymore?



engineering is a stepping stone to many different occupations. many managers of divisions, companies, etc..are engineers.

you need to have a blend of technical know how and ability to write and communicate to really move up though. take some communication courses and look at Dale Carnegie etc...
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 6:02:46 AM EST
No, the first step is to make sure the classes WILL actually transfer to the school you're planning on attending later.

Originally Posted By bngracing:
Take Trig & Calc classes at your local community college. If you can stomach that and get good grades, transfer your credits to a university. While you're at the CC, might as well save a few bucks and get all the bullshit classes out of the way like Health 101, some language, misc. useless bullshit you took in high school, and as many math classes the university you want to attend will allow. Not a bad idea to take a CAD class or learn your way around a machine shop. Knowing how to weld, CNC, and other special skills will put you a couple steps a head of other grads who have no skills...only grades.

If you fuck up, no big deal; you're out a couple hundred bucks. Fuck up a year at a university and you pissed away $10 grand.


Link Posted: 7/6/2013 6:14:06 AM EST
Maintain consistent study habits -- copy down everything the prof writes on the board, pay attention, attend every class, do your homework assignments.
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 6:47:40 AM EST
Originally Posted By Rustler:


I would LOVE to do both engineering and physical work. I grew up busting my ass in construction. Now I sit in a cube all day. If I could get a job where I did both it'd be pretty sweet.




That's my current job. (ME) I work for the local power company at a large coal-fired generating station. Here engineers mostly manage projects and provide technical support. I support piping, boilers, boiler inspection, performance tuning, and handle any welding and/or inspection issues that come up. I also manage capital projects and large O&M projects and love interfacing with contractors in the field. It's just above freezing in the winter and 120 to 140 in the summer. Our biggest problem is trying to find hands on engineers that are motivated and don't mind getting dirty. I did the corporate gig for a while in a cubicle and it's not for me.


Personally, I hated school, at least until we got out of the weed-out courses. I saw a lot of people smarter than myself quit for stupid reasons. Usually it was a weedout course or a dislike for a couple of classes. Newsflash: most of us don't sit in a cube all day performing solving calculus and differential equations. The ME field is broad enough one shouldn't have a hard time finding a job they enjoy.

My number one recommendation is find a co-operative internship with the company you are interested in working for or in your field. You will learn just as much there as you will at school and it will set you apart from other new engineers. I review a lot of resumes for co-ops and new engineers, for the most part they look the same. What sets people apart is their work experience and/or co-op/internship and interests/activities. For my line of work a prospective intern that works on cars as a hobby is more likely to succeed than one that reads the huffington post and listens to poetry at the coffee shop.
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 6:47:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/6/2013 6:51:28 AM EST by Tombstone88]
I went back to school in spring '12. I've been getting my generals out if the way (mostly math) at the community college. I'm taking Calc I this semester. (note: DON"T TAKE CALC I DURING SUMMER SEMESTER!) Up until this semester I've been able to get by with night classes and work my 40 hours during the day. Far from fun, but not impossible. I'm at a crossroads now of how to proceed. I know the day is coming soon when I will have to go to school full time and will not have much to live on. Financial aid is a no go for me since I get up in the morning and actually work (I cannot figure out how so many people get .gov checks all time when they sit on their ass and do nothing and I ask for just a couple hundred bucks to help me better my life after working 60-80 hrs a week and they tell me to FO) Off the soapbox, I am. Would appreciate some input on this from some people who've been there. Don't wanna hijack OP's thread but I think it would be relevant to things he'll need to be thinking about as well. Options I see:

1 - Take out loans to cover school and cost of living. Risky and would negate a few years of the the whole reason I'm going back
2 - Find an internship that might help cover some of the cost and have money from it to survive. I'm just not sure if I have enough schooling under my belt to accomplish this

The wifee has a fairly decent income (abt 50K) so that will help a lot towards things but it won't cover near everything. So what says the engineering hive?!

eta: 3 - Have applied for scholarships. Am currently waiting to hear back
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 6:57:42 AM EST
Here's some questions to ask yourself before going into engineering school.

Do you love math? If someone writes a complicated second order differential equation on a cocktail napkin at a bar, is it your idea of fun to try to solve it without looking up any reference material? If not, perhaps engineering isn't for you.

Do you enjoy school? Would you enroll in extra, unnecessary classes just because "hey, that looks interesting. I'd like to know more about that."? If not, perhaps engineering isn't for you.

Can you work your way through school, or otherwise avoid student loans? Engineering school is likely to be 5 years, and engineering school isn't cheap. $15k/year is reasonable for one of the less expensive public schools. That's a $75,000 debt before you even get a job. Plus living expenses for five years - can you live in a tiny roach-ridden apartment with three roommates for five years? If not, you're going to be spending an awful lot more. You're rapidly approaching the level of debt that you will never be able to repay. If you can't consolidate your loans, the minimum monthly payments from all the providers may add up to more than a new engineer's take home pay.
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 7:24:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By Hollands1:

The company I work for has been hiring young engineers left and right...
It has great opportunities but they spend more time doing project management than actual engineering.


+1

I am an RF engineer for a telecommunications company (Point-to-Point, 2way radio, WLAN, etc). Engineers are always in high demand in my line of work due to the type of work we do. Most of my work is project management after the design has been completed and accepted. Getting the degree can be expensive and it will be challenging. You want to make sure whatever school you go to is ABET accredited. Also keep in mind depending what engineering route you take you may have to earn your PE before you start making good money. As an RF engineer I don't gain much for getting my PE. None of my work has to be sealed so having a PE won't do much for my income. Had I gone into civil or one of the many other options that would not have been the case
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 7:32:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By ArimoDave:
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
Originally Posted By sd_norske:
What kind of engineer do you want to be? The curriculum varies widely depending on the major.

ME is heavy on math. ChemE is obviously heavy on the the chemistry. EE is full of a bunch of made up nonsense. MinE requires crayons and a bionic liver.


i was thinking ME or EE. any examples of this made up nonsense?


Electrons and holes. With some things you think about electrons moving through wires. In other things you have to think about holes moving in substances instead. Then there is the imaginary stuff called fields, like electric and magnetic fields.

The letter "i" is generally used for imaginary numbers, but the EEs use the letter "j" instead.



Because we have to deal with current and it is classically already using 'i'?

And electric and magnetic fields are pretty damn far from 'imaginary.'

EE math gets very hard about your senior year.

Conformal mapping, the Z transform.

The MEs stopped after taking differential equations.
EEs still had more than 2 years to go.
Link Posted: 7/6/2013 7:34:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By ArimoDave:
Originally Posted By gmtech825:
Originally Posted By sd_norske:
What kind of engineer do you want to be? The curriculum varies widely depending on the major.

ME is heavy on math. ChemE is obviously heavy on the the chemistry. EE is full of a bunch of made up nonsense. MinE requires crayons and a bionic liver.


i was thinking ME or EE. any examples of this made up nonsense?


Electrons and holes. With some things you think about electrons moving through wires. In other things you have to think about holes moving in substances instead. Then there is the imaginary stuff called fields, like electric and magnetic fields.

The letter "i" is generally used for imaginary numbers, but the EEs use the letter "j" instead.



Because we have to deal with current and it is classically already using 'i'?

And electric and magnetic fields are pretty damn far from 'imaginary.'

EE math gets very hard about your senior year.

Conformal mapping, the Z transform.

The MEs stopped after taking differential equations.
EEs still had more than 2 years to go.


All that shit's done with software now.
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