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Posted: 6/2/2009 5:58:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 2:07:02 PM EST by NimmerMehr]
anyone does that? will imaging a scsi disk from a unix system (unix partition, probably BSD style and unix file system) be successful if the imaging is performed on a win32 system?

I thinking there might be c/h/s/, ext c/h/s or lba translation issues, but i donno for certain.

Edit:

I imaged to a larger drive with a ubuntu live cd. Then in windows, with a disk editor, looked over random sectors and they are the same, so the image seemed to have worked, but the unix box won't boot from the target drive, but it will the source drive.
Link Posted: 6/2/2009 7:17:13 PM EST
It doesn't matter what system you do the imaging on as long as it is a raw bit for bit image. The host operating system does not have to be able to read the imaged file system, it only has to be able to recognize the hard drive correctly so that it can read the info of the hard drive to make an exact copy of the image .... ie 10001110101010101101010101 etc....
Link Posted: 6/3/2009 11:52:21 AM EST
Yeah, I know that.

Disk A works in system.

Disk A is imaged to Disk B.

Disk B does not work in system.


If disks were different sizes that might be a problem, no? Then the imaging software WOULD have to know about the MBR and file systems, etc?
Link Posted: 6/4/2009 8:07:13 AM EST
How are you currently imaging the disk?
Link Posted: 6/4/2009 1:47:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/4/2009 1:47:38 PM EST by NimmerMehr]
Ghost, but i think that is part of the problem as Ghost might be too Windows centric, even in a raw mode.
Link Posted: 6/4/2009 1:50:56 PM EST
What, exactly, are you trying to do?

You can use Linux to easily make an image using the dd tool. You can even mount said image while it is a file.

If you are trying to move the image to a larger disk I hear it can be done, but I wouldn't trust doing it that way. I'd just format a new drive and use rsync to copy the old over to the new.

Link Posted: 6/4/2009 1:54:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By libertynews:
What, exactly, are you trying to do?

You can use Linux to easily make an image using the dd tool. You can even mount said image while it is a file.

If you are trying to move the image to a larger disk I hear it can be done, but I wouldn't trust doing it that way. I'd just format a new drive and use rsync to copy the old over to the new.



this is perfect.

dd if=/dev/hdX of=/dev/hdY bs=(blocksize)

that's the easiest way to do it... and you can image to a larger drive, i've done it in solaris and concurrent powermax OS, i'd have to dig through my old notes...
Link Posted: 6/4/2009 2:18:13 PM EST
You can image to a larger drive, but you'd typically lose the excess disk space on a larger disk - the size info in the disk header will get dd'd over to the new disk and it'll just report itself as being the same size. Probably better to create your partitions on the new disk, then move the fs data over using tar, cpio, dd, etc.
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 2:04:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/15/2009 2:06:10 PM EST by NimmerMehr]
update in op
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 2:36:29 PM EST
You need to update the MBR on the new disk. Ubuntu uses Grub.

See the 2nd post here

Link Posted: 6/15/2009 4:01:48 PM EST

Originally Posted By libertynews:
You need to update the MBR on the new disk. Ubuntu uses Grub.

See the 2nd post here


that works on a risc/unix system?
Link Posted: 6/15/2009 8:03:07 PM EST
Originally Posted By NimmerMehr:

Originally Posted By libertynews:
You need to update the MBR on the new disk. Ubuntu uses Grub.

See the 2nd post here


that works on a risc/unix system?


Oh, sorry, thought it was a Ubuntu system.

Depends on what the OS is and how you restore it's Master Boot Record (MBR).
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