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Posted: 1/28/2014 11:33:59 AM EDT
Where better to ask than arfcom?

1)  I know the U571 discussion probably already happened but I want to ask - Could the US crew that boarded the German boat really be able to maneuver it and do all the shit they did?  I get into my wife's car and can't figure out how to plug in the fucking iPod and get the back wiper to turn on.

2)  How do they keep a waterproof seal on the prop shaft from leaking, especially in the new subs?
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 11:36:53 AM EDT
1. Don't know
2. Circumference of prop shaft it stuffed with packing similar to a valve stem. There may still be leakage but a small amount is ok. Bilge pumps will keep up with that.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 11:37:34 AM EDT
1.  No.  At least not well.

2.  Prop glands.Ships have used them for eons.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 11:39:48 AM EDT
1. no

2. shaft seals (not the ball juggling fish eating kind)
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 11:40:42 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Ameshawki:
1.  No.  At least not well.

2.  Prop glands.Ships have used them for eons.
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Please elaborate.  I'm constantly changing and tightening the plumbing in my business.  The faucets are always leaking and that got me wondering - how the F do they do it on a sub under 800 feet of water?  
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 12:01:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2014 12:04:37 PM EDT by Dino]
1)  yes, assuming they can read German.   Valves are valves and diesel engines are diesel engines.  









2) shaft seals










eta:







http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/03-html/3-8.html  for a better explanation and some history.







hope that helps.


 
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 12:15:56 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Dino:
1)  yes, assuming they can read German.   Valves are valves and diesel engines are diesel engines.  

2) shaft seals

eta:

http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/03-html/3-8.html  for a better explanation and some history.

hope that helps.
 
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thanks guys!
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 12:28:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 12:28:39 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dino:
1)  yes, assuming they can read German.   Valves are valves and diesel engines are diesel engines.  

2) shaft seals

eta:

http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/03-html/3-8.html  for a better explanation and some history.

hope that helps.
 
View Quote



1   It isn't always righy tighty lefty loosy.  As an example on German aircraft the throttle is pulled back to increase, pushed forward to slow.  British and American aircraft were the opposite.  Numbering system could be off as well.  On German ships compartments are numbered from the stern forward.  It's the opposite in American ships.  Is ballast tank one in the bow or stern?  Kind of important to know.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 12:32:18 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dino:
1)  yes, assuming they can read German.   Valves are valves and diesel engines are diesel engines.  

2) shaft seals

eta:

http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/03-html/3-8.html  for a better explanation and some history.

hope that helps.
 
View Quote


You qualified in submarines? 'Cause you sure as hell couldn't do that just going from one class of boat to another. Never mind from a foreign country!
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 12:48:27 PM EDT


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Ameshawki:
1   It isn't always righy tighty lefty loosy.  As an example on German aircraft the throttle is pulled back to increase, pushed forward to slow.  British and American aircraft were the opposite.  Numbering system could be off as well.  On German ships compartments are numbered from the stern forward.  It's the opposite in American ships.  Is ballast tank one in the bow or stern?  Kind of important to know.
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Originally Posted By Ameshawki:





Originally Posted By Dino:


1)  yes, assuming they can read German.   Valves are valves and diesel engines are diesel engines.  





2) shaft seals





eta:





http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/03-html/3-8.html  for a better explanation and some history.





hope that helps.


 

1   It isn't always righy tighty lefty loosy.  As an example on German aircraft the throttle is pulled back to increase, pushed forward to slow.  British and American aircraft were the opposite.  Numbering system could be off as well.  On German ships compartments are numbered from the stern forward.  It's the opposite in American ships.  Is ballast tank one in the bow or stern?  Kind of important to know.





 

All of which gets figured out during familiarization.  







Again:  Diesel engines are diesel engines.   If you can run one, you can figure out another.   Valves are valves.  How you open and close them may be different, but either way you know how it functions.  







Unless someone has built in some sort of "push this button and the sub implodes" as a weird security measure, any competent submarine crew would figure it out quickly.







On 4 June 1944, a hunter-killer group of the United States Navy captured the German submarine U-505. This event marked the first time a U.S. Navy vessel had captured an enemy vessel at sea since the nineteenth century. The action took place in the Atlantic Ocean, at Latitude 21-30N, Longitude 19-20W, about 150 miles off the coast of Rio De Oro, Africa. The American force was commanded by Captain Daniel V. Gallery, USN, and comprised the escort Carrier Guadalcanal (CVE-60) and five escort vessels under Commander Frederick S. Hall, USN: Pillsbury (DE-133) Pope DE-134), Flaherty (DE-135), Chatelain (DE-149), and Jenks (DE-665). As a result of the American attack on U-505, the German crew abandoned the boat after setting scuttling charges and pulling plugs to sink the submarine. Then Pillsbury sent its motor whaleboat to the circling submarine where Lieutenant (junior grade) Albert L. David, USN, led an eight-man party on board. Despite the probability of U-505 sinking or blowing up at any minute and not knowing what form of resistance they might meet below, David and his men clambered up the conning tower and then down the hatches into the boat itself. After a quick examination proved the U-boat was completely deserted (except for one dead man on deck - the only fatality of the action), the boarders set about bundling up charts, code books, and papers, disconnecting demolition charges, closing valves, and plugging leaks. By the time the flood of water had been stopped, the U-boat was low in the water and down by the stern. Lieutenant David was awarded a Medal of Honor for his role in this operation







The British also captured a u-boat and recommissioned it in British service.







Subs overall are very complex machines, but they only work because each of the systems is very simple and robust.  

 
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 12:53:47 PM EDT

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Originally Posted By subcomunic8r:
You qualified in submarines? 'Cause you sure as hell couldn't do that just going from one class of boat to another. Never mind from a foreign country!

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Originally Posted By subcomunic8r:



Originally Posted By Dino:

1)  yes, assuming they can read German.   Valves are valves and diesel engines are diesel engines.  



2) shaft seals



eta:



http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/03-html/3-8.html  for a better explanation and some history.



hope that helps.

 




You qualified in submarines? 'Cause you sure as hell couldn't do that just going from one class of boat to another. Never mind from a foreign country!





 
Yes, I qualified on an Ethan Allen class.   If I had gone to another boat I would have been fully qualified within a few weeks.  




I would not have been allowed to do it without re-qualling, but I could have done it.  




Were you a coner or a nuke?




The nuclear quals would have taken longer than the sub quals.   I'm speaking of basic operation of the sub.




The biggest problem with a foreign sub is the language difference.   I'd bet I could qual on an sub from any English speaking country in a few weeks as well.




It isn't rocket science.  
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 1:01:24 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Dino:

  Yes, I qualified on an Ethan Allen class.   If I had gone to another boat I would have been fully qualified within a few weeks.  

I would not have been allowed to do it without re-qualling, but I could have done it.  

Were you a coner or a nuke?

The nuclear quals would have taken longer than the sub quals.   I'm speaking of basic operation of the sub.

The biggest problem with a foreign sub is the language difference.   I'd bet I could qual on an sub from any English speaking country in a few weeks as well.

It isn't rocket science.  
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Originally Posted By Dino:
Originally Posted By subcomunic8r:
Originally Posted By Dino:
1)  yes, assuming they can read German.   Valves are valves and diesel engines are diesel engines.  

2) shaft seals

eta:

http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/03-html/3-8.html  for a better explanation and some history.

hope that helps.
 


You qualified in submarines? 'Cause you sure as hell couldn't do that just going from one class of boat to another. Never mind from a foreign country!

  Yes, I qualified on an Ethan Allen class.   If I had gone to another boat I would have been fully qualified within a few weeks.  

I would not have been allowed to do it without re-qualling, but I could have done it.  

Were you a coner or a nuke?

The nuclear quals would have taken longer than the sub quals.   I'm speaking of basic operation of the sub.

The biggest problem with a foreign sub is the language difference.   I'd bet I could qual on an sub from any English speaking country in a few weeks as well.

It isn't rocket science.  


Coner. Qualified Lafayette, Sturgeon and Los Angeles class. Of course it could be done, just not in the timeframe of the movie.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 1:20:38 PM EDT
U505 was taken to sea by the USN after it was captured - in order to assess technology.  Edward L Beach was the skipper.  My father was the Chief Torpedoman.  May they both Rest in Peace.
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 1:22:40 PM EDT
OP's wife pics failed to load.

We have rules
Link Posted: 1/28/2014 1:36:02 PM EDT
Maybe they could if some people that worked on them prewar fled to the US since the main u-boat model of the war was from 1936-
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