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Posted: 4/18/2017 8:36:20 PM EDT
sawyer advise welcome

I have a Jonsered 630. it used to throw chains after 5-10 min of cutting (i.e. loosen quite badly). now it seems that I'm not throwing chains but if I cut for several minutes straight the chain tensioning screw breaks. what am I doing wrong and what do I need to do to fix it? it runs like a top otherwise. the most recent one broke after I was doing very controlled, vertical cuts on a big stump.

I'm doing homeowner type work + I use it for milling timbers with a log jig--a few a year.

if I replace it with a new saw; I remember reading the threads here, but can't find em on the search re: husky/stihl and good models. I would like some recommendations on this too please. I would happily pay for high quality stuff as I tend to beat the crap out of my tools and don't mind rebuilding them.

thanks all
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 8:42:14 PM EDT
i like my echo cs400. Would putting loctite on the tension screw be a bad idea?
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 8:44:00 PM EDT
Hmmm. Not sure why you're breaking the tensioning screw. Maybe try a new bar? Make sure all the other hardware is tight.

I do know you should be using a rip chain for milling.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 8:51:42 PM EDT
Once the bar nuts are tightened after tensioning you might try backing off the adjusting screw a bit. I've never had this problem, but it seems like once the bar was locked down it wouldn't be a problem to destress the adjuster.

Since you know it is a problem in either direction, check your chain tension frequently in use.

For Stihl or Husqvarna just figure out how many cubic centimeters you need, then buy the pro model of that volume.

Best of luck.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 8:55:08 PM EDT
Sounds like a bent bar or maybe a nose sprocket goin bad maybe even a bent drive link or two. With bar nuts tight there shouldn't be a lot of pressure on tensioner. Keep us posted
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 8:56:07 PM EDT
Stihl is what you seek.


Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:00:18 PM EDT
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damn that's sexy!!! I agree go with the professional series in Stihl if you decide to retire your saw. But I wouldn't retire it just yet it just needs some tlc
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:01:47 PM EDT
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Quoted:
i like my echo cs400. Would putting loctite on the tension screw be a bad idea?
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Yes. The point is to be able to use it to tension the chain.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 9:04:00 PM EDT
Have you successfully used this saw in the past, or is it used and always been an issue?  I have no idea off hand.

If  you are replacing, go with a pro model in the CC you think you need.  Any of the big names will treat you well.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:33:41 PM EDT
saw worked great for a few years. then it started throwing chains. the shop I bring it to said bar was fine. for some reason now I'm running through the tensioning screws now--Loctite is NOT an option. instead of the chain coming loose the screws break. the sprocket on the front of the bar seems to run fine. I may just try replacing it and see what happens. the engine on the saw runs great and it would be a damn shame to not get it running properly.

There's really nothing worsen than throwing a chain when you're 9/10ths through felling a tree.

the guy that sharpens my chains and supplies parts is a stihl dealer. I have to pickup some chains soon so I will look at pro model saws. he does all the chainsaw contract work for a major metro FD so I am inclined to trust his opinions. he does custom grind ripping chains for me for timbers.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:36:49 PM EDT
How's the oiler working and how is the sprocket at the tip of the bar?  What kind of wood, how sharp is chain?

When you have re-set the bar, is the chain somewhat slack (but not REALLY slack), or is it tight against the bar?

If you want to replace it...how long of a bar do you want to use on it and what style of chain do you use (full skip, yada)....and I can give you a suggestion for a Stihl that I'd buy for that application (if I were going to do that job).
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 10:56:16 PM EDT
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Quoted:
How's the oiler working and how is the sprocket at the tip of the bar?  What kind of wood, how sharp is chain?

When you have re-set the bar, is the chain somewhat slack (but not REALLY slack), or is it tight against the bar?

If you want to replace it...how long of a bar do you want to use on it and what style of chain do you use (full skip, yada)....and I can give you a suggestion for a Stihl that I'd buy for that application (if I were going to do that job).
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the oiler at the bar tip "seems" to be ok. I wouldn't know if it were a problem unless it didn't spin freely or was seized.

chain always tightened with slack--roughly 3/8"

18"bar. I rarely use that much bar but it is nice to have from time to time.

I uses non-skip chains. the last 2 tensioning screws I broke were doing some work on a big maple. maybe for that I should use full or half skip chains?
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:04:13 PM EDT
On a 18" bar why run any skip chains? I could be wrong but I'm guessing either tensioner is not being installed correctly or bar/chain is bent or front sprocket, if you replace bar get chain and drive sprocket as well.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:15:40 PM EDT
Try a new bar, typically after tightening the bar nuts the chain gets a little tighter.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:15:50 PM EDT
I had a saw that kept throwing chains. Couldnt get more than about 15 minutes of cutting and I had to stop and tighten it. I replaced the bar and the problem went away. Original and replacement bar were both made by Oregon.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 11:45:27 PM EDT
I do a lotta chain saw work.  If you do a lotta chain saw work, get a serious chain saw.  I don't mean a Stihl or Husky, I mean a Dolmar.  Dolmar is made in Germany.  They sell chain saws to the US Forest Service and make chain saws for the Japanese tool company Makita.  Their saws are blue and Dolmar's are orange/red but that is about the only difference.  I bought a pre-ban, yes they had a ban too, in 2005 and it is still running strong.  The ban was a smog ban so mine can be turned manually.  It is a small one, Dolmar 104 but it has taken tons of hard work and abuse.  Next time, I'm going out there for the biggest one I can find in the $600.00-$800.00 rage.  Believe it or not my wife is cool with this because she has seen how hard it works and how easily other inferior chain saws break down.  This saw cuts the wood which warms us in the winter.  This chain saw is central to my existence and so I think this is good advice.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 8:53:19 AM EDT
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Quoted:
I do a lotta chain saw work.  If you do a lotta chain saw work, get a serious chain saw.  I don't mean a Stihl or Husky, I mean a Dolmar.  Dolmar is made in Germany.  They sell chain saws to the US Forest Service and make chain saws for the Japanese tool company Makita.  Their saws are blue and Dolmar's are orange/red but that is about the only difference.  I bought a pre-ban, yes they had a ban too, in 2005 and it is still running strong.  The ban was a smog ban so mine can be turned manually.  It is a small one, Dolmar 104 but it has taken tons of hard work and abuse.  Next time, I'm going out there for the biggest one I can find in the $600.00-$800.00 rage.  Believe it or not my wife is cool with this because she has seen how hard it works and how easily other inferior chain saws break down.  This saw cuts the wood which warms us in the winter.  This chain saw is central to my existence and so I think this is good advice.
View Quote
I have a Dolmar 7910, 3 Stihls and 2 Husqvarnas. They all do a good job, and they all have their little quirks. I've seen nothing to show one brand is vastly superior to another.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 9:07:36 AM EDT
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Quoted:
I have a Dolmar 7910, 3 Stihls and 2 Husqvarnas. They all do a good job, and they all have their little quirks. I've seen nothing to show one brand is vastly superior to another.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I do a lotta chain saw work.  If you do a lotta chain saw work, get a serious chain saw.  I don't mean a Stihl or Husky, I mean a Dolmar.  Dolmar is made in Germany.  They sell chain saws to the US Forest Service and make chain saws for the Japanese tool company Makita.  Their saws are blue and Dolmar's are orange/red but that is about the only difference.  I bought a pre-ban, yes they had a ban too, in 2005 and it is still running strong.  The ban was a smog ban so mine can be turned manually.  It is a small one, Dolmar 104 but it has taken tons of hard work and abuse.  Next time, I'm going out there for the biggest one I can find in the $600.00-$800.00 rage.  Believe it or not my wife is cool with this because she has seen how hard it works and how easily other inferior chain saws break down.  This saw cuts the wood which warms us in the winter.  This chain saw is central to my existence and so I think this is good advice.
I have a Dolmar 7910, 3 Stihls and 2 Husqvarnas. They all do a good job, and they all have their little quirks. I've seen nothing to show one brand is vastly superior to another.
I'll add Echo to this list.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 10:39:56 AM EDT
Attachment Attached File


Small, medium, and large.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 10:48:37 AM EDT
sounds like the bar is loose somehow, can't see what else would cause it.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 10:58:28 AM EDT
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Quoted:



the oiler at the bar tip "seems" to be ok. I wouldn't know if it were a problem unless it didn't spin freely or was seized.

chain always tightened with slack--roughly 3/8"

18"bar. I rarely use that much bar but it is nice to have from time to time.

I uses non-skip chains. the last 2 tensioning screws I broke were doing some work on a big maple. maybe for that I should use full or half skip chains?
View Quote
What do you mean by 3/8" slack?  Like the chain hangs 3/8" below the bar or you can pull it away from the bar 3/8"?

Also what does your chain sprocket look like. STIHL recommends a new sprocket every 2 worn out chains. So every other chain you need to buy that you should also buy a sprocket.
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