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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/5/2005 12:35:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/5/2005 2:50:28 PM EDT by TexRdnec]
rejoined the VFD not too long ago, yesterday we had this little gem



Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:37:12 PM EDT
That will definitely NOT buff out.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:42:06 PM EDT
heres some more





Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:43:17 PM EDT
Anyone make it out of that mess? Pretty sure I know the answer...
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:45:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By EPOCH96:
Anyone make it out of that mess? Pretty sure I know the answer...



motherfucker lived

even the FAA investigators couldn't believe it. burnt, but last i heard stable condition. way i understand it he was in the process of exiting said plane right as the 171 gallons of gas it had on board went up.

guy was from alaska, in the process of buying the plane, this was its test flight................made it 500 yards from the airport. no insurance on the plane.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:48:57 PM EDT
Doors are open. I'd say if there were 2 or fewer on board, they both made it out. Was that a Cessna 310?
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:52:17 PM EDT
Tag (NTSB database only updated through 8/1 - waiting for it to be posted)
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:52:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:

Originally Posted By EPOCH96:
Anyone make it out of that mess? Pretty sure I know the answer...



motherfucker lived

even the FAA investigators couldn't believe it. burnt, but last i heard stable condition. way i understand it he was in the process of exiting said plane right as the 171 gallons of gas it had on board went up.

guy was from alaska, in the process of buying the plane, this was its test flight................made it 500 yards from the airport. no insurance on the plane.



Doesn't the NTSB investigate that?
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:53:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Airwolf:
Tag (NTSB database only updated through 8/1 - waiting for it to be posted)

I looked for it on Landings but it has been bumped by 62,487 articles about the fatal midair in Renton.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 12:53:44 PM EDT
what a waste of a perfectly good aircraft
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:31:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By O-320:

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:

Originally Posted By EPOCH96:
Anyone make it out of that mess? Pretty sure I know the answer...



motherfucker lived

even the FAA investigators couldn't believe it. burnt, but last i heard stable condition. way i understand it he was in the process of exiting said plane right as the 171 gallons of gas it had on board went up.

guy was from alaska, in the process of buying the plane, this was its test flight................made it 500 yards from the airport. no insurance on the plane.



Doesn't the NTSB investigate that?



guys ID said FAA on it, damned if i know...............based in san antonio, also know that

apparently since this was his first flight in the thing he was having it videotaped, whole thing is on film..................said it was spitting and sputtering before he ever took off and don't know why the hell he did in the first place

also, apparently he had a running plane in alaska and borrowed parts off of it to make this one flyable...................he's out two planes

if i remember right they said the props from his other plane were on this one and right behind the drivers seat you might be able to make out an engine block.................that was for his other plane too
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 2:48:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/5/2005 2:53:42 PM EDT by TexRdnec]
even more pictures







Link Posted: 8/5/2005 3:11:52 PM EDT
We had one of our flight instructors ( awesome stick, great lady ) pancake a Beech Musketeer about 200 yards short just the other day at Rancho Murrietta.

They had been out the night before and stopped at her place at Eagles Nest to stay the night because we have no lights at Rancho.

Had to fly a whole 7 miles and ran out of gas on the way.

She ended up with a bad back injury and has to have a second operation on Monday, the 17year old female student broke her back also, and it appears that one operation will be enough for her. The CFIs daughter ( 7 yrs old ) got away with no serious injuries.

I'm still trying to figure out why they didn't switch tanks before leaving, one side empty ( side selected ) and one full to the top.

Sometimes even the best pilots do stupid things. ( sadly )

Link Posted: 8/5/2005 6:58:32 PM EDT
A little duck tape...

A little bailing wire...

GOOD AS NEW
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 7:03:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 7:07:02 PM EDT
Almost looks like an Aerostar
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 7:08:28 PM EDT
He'll make allright, just glad he was pic'd with a big ole dildo.
Link Posted: 8/5/2005 7:20:39 PM EDT
That's my guess.
Terrible glider by the looks of that Ted Smith wing...


Originally Posted By Austrian:
Almost looks like an Aerostar

Link Posted: 8/6/2005 2:10:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By flaperon:
That's my guess.
Terrible glider by the looks of that Ted Smith wing...


Originally Posted By Austrian:
Almost looks like an Aerostar




Tiny fin. Slope on the bottom of the nose. Long Pitot off the tail. Anti-ice on the tail...
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 2:20:14 AM EDT
i wasnt real fond of the areostar anyway
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 2:20:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:
rejoined the VFD not too long ago, yesterday we had this little gem





welcome back brother!
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 2:32:23 AM EDT
[mortal kombat]TOASSSST-EEEEEEEEEEE!!!!![/mortal kombat]
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 5:55:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Citabria7GCBC:

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:
rejoined the VFD not too long ago, yesterday we had this little gem





welcome back brother!



seemed like the thing to do at the time..................

heres a pic of my baby........................they can keep their pretty little pierce pumpers, i go straight for this one



315hp 855ci cummins, little eaton roadranger 9 sp, ugly as sin, my kinda truck
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:04:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
Doors are open. I'd say if there were 2 or fewer on board, they both made it out. Was that a Cessna 310?



from the looks of the engine\cowling its a 310.

i don't see the tell tale wing tanks though. so its just a guess.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:14:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Austrian:
Almost looks like an Aerostar

You mean DeathStar! With that goofy tank in the rear behind the cabin. There was a 310 that whoever owned it,must have forgotten it,as it sat so long that the windows turned yellow,the paint all peeled off,the tires rotted away,ect.......
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:17:49 AM EDT
That's an Aerostar, many doctors/lawyers have met their maker in that thing.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:19:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
what a waste of a perfectly good aircraft



Looks like an AeroStar (AeroScar)....No big loss.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 11:16:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rick-James:
That's an Aerostar, many doctors/lawyers have met their maker in that thing.



My sister has one. Bonanzas are worse for Doctors and Lawyers.

The thing with the Aerostar is just don't reach out to close the door if it opens in flight. Slipstream will take your left arm right into the left prop (as someone on here pointed out once).

Link Posted: 8/6/2005 11:38:49 AM EDT
Looks like a waste of a perfectly good plane (100% pilot error). How burnt was the pilot? any other injuries (eg, back)?

Looks to me like the plane fell almost straight down (ie, stalled out).
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 12:34:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Austrian:

Originally Posted By Rick-James:
That's an Aerostar, many doctors/lawyers have met their maker in that thing.



My sister has one. Bonanzas are worse for Doctors and Lawyers.

The thing with the Aerostar is just don't reach out to close the door if it opens in flight. Slipstream will take your left arm right into the left prop (as someone on here pointed out once).


Plus a fuel tank inside the fuselage,there was a rumor that someone made a turboprop AeroStar,between Aerostars and 310s,saw alot of them running cancelled checks.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 12:45:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MattyMattel:

Originally Posted By Austrian:

Originally Posted By Rick-James:
That's an Aerostar, many doctors/lawyers have met their maker in that thing.



My sister has one. Bonanzas are worse for Doctors and Lawyers.

The thing with the Aerostar is just don't reach out to close the door if it opens in flight. Slipstream will take your left arm right into the left prop (as someone on here pointed out once).


Plus a fuel tank inside the fuselage,there was a rumor that someone made a turboprop AeroStar,between Aerostars and 310s,saw alot of them running cancelled checks.



Yep. You can get the Superstar 700. www.aerostaraircraft.com/

The problem with a lot of the Aerostars is that they were used for all weather check running and though they are not as old as many airframes out there they have LOTS of hours and have often been run with limited maintainence reserves. The result is that a lot of people don't have the patience (or resources) to keep them up.

Aerostars, more so than most planes, are VERY unforgiving of small mistakes. They have NO glide ratio. They hate asymmetric thrust. That rudder is TINY. etc. etc.

Throw turbos in and suddenly you have a hangar queen.

Flying the 601P though, if it has been carefully nursed, is a wonderful thing. Plus, they just plain get you where you want to be really fricking fast.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 12:47:03 PM EDT
my most memorable call as a VFF was a plane crash, No sheet metal left. Pilot burnt so bad that as his muscle's contracted from the heat it broke every long bone in his body. He was code 7 obviously but his mouth was open like he was screaming, before we got there. witnesses said he was but they couldnt see him for the flames. It's been about 3 years and I still have nightmares hearing the guy scream.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 12:52:33 PM EDT
Looks like an Aerostar.

Never flown one, never wanted to.

Not long after I quit flying checks in the Beech Baron (a long time ago) a few companies started using Aerostars as freighters. All quite worn out looking. Always felt sorry for the kids who had to strap that on each night.

The Aerostar can be flown safely but it's not a good plane for a novice or non-profecient multi-engine pilot.

The turbo-prop I fly now is a King Air and it is much more forgiving than an Aerostar I'm sure.

Fly safe,

Flyer
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 1:08:15 PM EDT
Was on news lastnight here in San Antonio, they said it was an experemental plane.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:50:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:

Originally Posted By Citabria7GCBC:

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:
rejoined the VFD not too long ago, yesterday we had this little gem





welcome back brother!



seemed like the thing to do at the time..................

heres a pic of my baby........................they can keep their pretty little pierce pumpers, i go straight for this one

tinypic.com/a2em1u.jpg

315hp 855ci cummins, little eaton roadranger 9 sp, ugly as sin, my kinda truck



thats one hell of a truck! our 18wheeler carries our bull dozers! My Engine is a Peirce!
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:20:47 PM EDT
By the looks of the props, both engines were under power(prop tips bent rearward). Why would he fly a functioning airplane into the dirt?
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 9:41:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/7/2005 9:43:33 AM EDT by TexRdnec]

Originally Posted By Andreuha:
Looks like a waste of a perfectly good plane (100% pilot error). How burnt was the pilot? any other injuries (eg, back)?

Looks to me like the plane fell almost straight down (ie, stalled out).



what the EMT told me was that he had burns to one leg and his upper torso and arms, no other injuries that i heard of

he took out tree limbs for about 75-100 yards before coming to rest there

if you look to the left of the tail in this picture you can see some of the downed tree limbs

Link Posted: 8/7/2005 9:44:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Citabria7GCBC:

thats one hell of a truck! our 18wheeler carries our bull dozers! My Engine is a Peirce!



has a 460 ford running the pump in the back too
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:10:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By EMSflyer:
Looks like an Aerostar.

Never flown one, never wanted to.

Not long after I quit flying checks in the Beech Baron (a long time ago) a few companies started using Aerostars as freighters. All quite worn out looking. Always felt sorry for the kids who had to strap that on each night.

The Aerostar can be flown safely but it's not a good plane for a novice or non-profecient multi-engine pilot.

The turbo-prop I fly now is a King Air and it is much more forgiving than an Aerostar I'm sure.

Fly safe,

Flyer

Yeah,sure looks like an Aerostar,long nose and swept tail. Those poor checkrunners,their planes looked like junk! Had some friends who did for the hours,we had one who thought it would be fun to chase the lineman with a 310,the young and dumb pilot got kicked out of the FBO,and fired. Had a customer who had an Aerostar,he replaced it with a MU-2,another junker,and a pain in the ass to fuel. Nothing like a King Air,tough ass bird,just as tough as something Boeing would put out.
Link Posted: 8/7/2005 10:12:48 AM EDT

Mmmmmm AFFF Foam !


Nice job him ! No insurance either.... Dumbass.

Bet the selling owner is feeling about like an idiot right now.

Link Posted: 8/31/2005 10:05:03 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 10:10:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By OZ309:
That will definitely NOT buff out.



couple metal patches and a new coat of paint may be in order though!
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 10:20:26 AM EDT
Anybody ever see or get a registration number for this airplane? If it indeed was an Aerostar (which I now believe it to be), it has a paint scheme remarkably similar to one a company I know used to own. They sold it 10+ years ago, but I've seen photos of it, and it had the maroon/silver/maroon stripes like this accident aircraft.

Bueller?
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 10:24:06 AM EDT
Found it:

NTSB Link


On August 4, 2005, approximately 0800 central daylight time, a twin-engine Smith Aerostar 601P airplane, N15BA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain following a reported loss of engine power while attempting to take-off from the San Patricio County Airport (T69) near Sinton, Texas. The airline transport rated pilot , sole occupant of the airplane, sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by private individuals. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan was not filed for the maintenance check flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 10:34:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
Found it:

NTSB Link


On August 4, 2005, approximately 0800 central daylight time, a twin-engine Smith Aerostar 601P airplane, N15BA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain following a reported loss of engine power while attempting to take-off from the San Patricio County Airport (T69) near Sinton, Texas. The airline transport rated pilot , sole occupant of the airplane, sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by private individuals. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan was not filed for the maintenance check flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.



amazing what you can find on the internet..................

and no, TRG, we don't have a ladder truck. hell, the only thing in town bigger than 2 stories is the old rialto theatre and it's abandoned
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 10:37:23 AM EDT
damn, that first one was just the cliff's notes


DFW05CA201
On August 4, 2005, approximately 0800 central daylight time, a twin-engine Smith Aerostar 601P airplane, N15BA, was destroyed when it impacted terrain following a reported loss of engine power while attempting to take-off from the San Patricio County Airport (T69) near Sinton, Texas. The airline transport rated pilot , sole occupant of the airplane, sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by private individuals. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan was not filed for the maintenance check flight conducted under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The 7,200-hour pilot reported in the Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident Report (NTSB Form 6120.1/2) that he had recently purchased the airplane. He added that the airplane had not been flown in nearly four years due to a propeller strike requiring extensive maintenance to the left engine and the replacement of the right engine. The pilot, who is also a certificated airframe and powerplant mechanic, completed the airplane's maintenance inspection before beginning the maintenance check flight.

The pilot stated, prior to take-off, "[he] noticed the left engine manifold pressure [was] higher than the right engine, and the left engine revolutions per minute (RPM) was approximately 200 RPM lower than the right engine." The pilot further stated, "this should have been cause for aborting the takeoff run immediately," yet he elected to continue with the takeoff on Runway 32 (a 4,323 feet long by 55 feet wide runway). During the takeoff roll, "the RPM was rapidly compensated for by the increase in manifold pressure, but not entirely."

The pilot added that he made power adjustments "late in the takeoff roll (1/4 to 1/2 runway length), as the airplane's acceleration seemed acceptable at the time. However, after lift-off the climb was tepid. Sluggish!" The pilot added that "about 50 feet or so it did not want to climb." The airplane then began to descend into trees at the departure end of the runway where it impacted terrain, and slid approximately 300 yards before coming to rest. A post-impact fire ensued. The pilot added, "[the] flight should have been aborted until deficiencies were corrected for."

The reason for the loss of engine could not be determined.

At 0751, the automated surface observing system at the Corpus Christi International Airport (CRP), near Corpus Christi, Texas, located approximately 15 miles south of the accident site reported wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 1,900 feet, temperature 79 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point 73 degrees Fahrenheit, and a barometric pressure of 30.01 inches of Mercury.



Link Posted: 8/31/2005 10:53:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:
damn, that first one was just the cliff's notes



<snip>


Sounds like "Go Fever!" claimed another airframe. The accident pilot owns another Aerostar (1978 Piper) and a Cessna 185 as well.
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