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11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/23/2004 5:41:13 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/23/2004 5:47:05 PM EST by XxSLASHERxX]
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 5:42:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/23/2004 5:45:24 PM EST by Guns_N_Shizzle]
yes

Part of the problem with buying a used Wrangler is that they hold their value very well. A lot of time you are better off spending a few extra thousand and going new.


I can sell you a 04 Sport hard top 5 speed with dana 44's for $21,400

Or a 04 Rubicon hardtop auto for $25,400

Or a 04 X Soft top I-6 auto for $18,000
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 5:43:53 PM EST
This is a frequent question around here. The mantra is that some years are better than others, but none can be placed in the 'reliable' category, with some being real toads.

Great fun, but often frustrating failures and a horrible dealer network.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 5:43:57 PM EST
4.0L Standard thanks!

BigDozer66
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 5:44:44 PM EST
Minor point .... If you want a 4.0 V6 you'll have to buy an Explorer .

The Jeep is an I-6
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 5:46:50 PM EST
TJs are good stuff.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:36:16 PM EST
Jeeps are GREAT, they keep you home with your family (because they are always broke down). Ya need a full $35,000. set of snap on tools, a NAPA store across the street from your house and a good mechanic for a neighbor. also look into a Life time Family membership with your local towing service.
And fill the back up with white rags to hang out the window while its broke down along the road.Also a GOOD pair of walking shoes & a cell phone. If ya keep it long enough, youll need a Divorce lawyer too.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:52:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/23/2004 6:53:09 PM EST by DJbump]
If the consensus is that Jeep Wranglers are not mechanically reliable, what would you folks suggest as an alternative in the $5-6K range for a used vehicle of recent vintage--say less than ten years old?

I've wanted to pick up a used Wrangler for a while, so if the mechanical reliability is suspect, I need alternatives.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:56:01 PM EST

Originally Posted By DJbump:
If the consensus is that Jeep Wranglers are not mechanically reliable, what would you folks suggest as an alternative in the $5-6K range for a used vehicle of recent vintage--say less than ten years old?

I've wanted to pick up a used Wrangler for a while, so if the mechanical reliability is suspect, I need alternatives.



Wranglers are pretty good, adn there is a huge aftermarket for them. Any mechanical defficiency they have can and has been corrected by the aftermarket.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:59:29 PM EST
My '92 YJ is still going strong after 121k miles.
Link Posted: 8/23/2004 6:59:35 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:39:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 10:39:52 AM EST by Boomer]

Originally Posted By DJbump:
If the consensus is that Jeep Wranglers are not mechanically reliable, what would you folks suggest as an alternative in the $5-6K range for a used vehicle of recent vintage--say less than ten years old?

I've wanted to pick up a used Wrangler for a while, so if the mechanical reliability is suspect, I need alternatives.



What consensus? The consensus of one or two ARFcomers?

I personally wouldn't hesitate one bit to recommend a stock 10 year old Cherokee or Wrangler with average miles as a daily driver.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:42:31 AM EST

Originally Posted By Boomer:

Originally Posted By DJbump:
If the consensus is that Jeep Wranglers are not mechanically reliable, what would you folks suggest as an alternative in the $5-6K range for a used vehicle of recent vintage--say less than ten years old?

I've wanted to pick up a used Wrangler for a while, so if the mechanical reliability is suspect, I need alternatives.



What consensus? The consensus of one or two ARFcomers?

I personally wouldn't hesitate one bit to recommend a stock 10 year old Cherokee or Wrangler with average miles as a daily driver.



I just got rid of my '99 Wrangler a few months ago (child #3 - ran out of seatbelt spots) During the five years I owned it I had exactly 0 unscheduled mainenance stops. It ran like a top, and even got better than EPA sticker mileage.

I miss my Wrangler, and would recommend them to anyone who wants a fun vehicle.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:46:45 AM EST
I have a totally reliable 2000 Wrangler
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:49:07 AM EST
I have one for sale! (I love it, but I need more room)

Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:53:53 AM EST

Originally Posted By Boomer:

What consensus? The consensus of one or two ARFcomers?




I asked a similar question in the 2000-2001 time frame and over half of the respondents said 'Love it, but be prepared to spend some time at the dealership correcting manufacturing problems or parts failures.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:55:12 AM EST
I've had two Wranglers; actually recently sold my 2002 off...

The I-6 in the Wrangler is bulletproof. There are jeepers out there with 300k+ miles on their motors and they're still pulling strong. Don't worry about any type of engine-related problems. Yah, lemons happen, but nothing chronic with that I-6.

If you want a new-ish one, try to find a 2002 model; they have an improved ducting system (read: the AC flows a lot better). Other than that...major model year differences are purely options. Newer ones have subwoofers in the center console and different speakers on the soundbar over your head, etc. That's about it.

The 3-speed automatic in those years is...well, they're also pretty reliable, but they are REALLY pokey. You won't be able to get out of your own way if you need to. The manual is much better from what I gather (I've never driven a manual so I couldn't tell you for a fact)

The reason I sold mine: interior room. That, and it didn't have the Hemi my pickup now has I'm a big guy and after over 2 years...I just couldn't fit all the crap I wanted to fit, into it. (Going to the range was especially tight on space, not to mention if I needed to carry anything or move anything..)

Link Posted: 8/30/2004 10:57:51 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 10:58:20 AM EST by Sierra_Hombre]
wranglers are for high school girls and frat boys, ESPECIALLY automatics. get a cj with eight cylinders.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:00:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 11:00:34 AM EST by DriftPunch]

Originally Posted By Sierra_Hombre:
wranglers are for high school girls and frat boys, ESPECIALLY automatics. get a cj with eight cylinders.



AR15s are only for criminals too...
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:17:04 AM EST
I have a 2002 TJ. I don't know where the 'unreliable' stuff comes in. It's BS, plain an simple. If you are really worried about it, get a new one - they all come with 7 yr/70,000 miles on the powertrain, and there isn't much in a Wrangler that ISN'T powertrain

I've had 5 jeeps in my familty, a '02 TJ, an '94 ZJ, a '97 ZJ, a '97 XJ, and a '01 KJ. The only one that had ANY issues was the KJ (Liberty), and that was mostly first-model-year related(recalls, etc). The '02 ZJ was my dad's company car, the other ZJ (Old Grand Cherokee) was killed in an accident, the XJ (Cherokee) was ALMOST killed, never the same, and replaced by the KJ. The TJ runs like a top.

Jeeps DO hold there value (at least Wranglers (YJ and TJ), XJ's, and CJ's) very well. Grands don't hold their value as well. Don't know about Libertys. You'll never get 'upside down' in a Wrangler - you will always be able to sell it for more than you owe on it.

If you need a little more room, you can look at a Wrangler 'Unlimited', which is a stretched TJ.

I'd stay away from the 3 speed auto. It's 1985 tech., pure and simple. The 5 speed is bulletproof- that's what I have. Also, you are correct in wanting the 4.0. The 2.5 is fine at 'rock crawling' speed, but lacks on the expressway.

Your model options are basically X, Sport, and Rubicon. The more you pay, the more you get off road. Any of them will run circles around any other stock vehicle you can buy. I'm pre-rubicon, so I have a sport set up as well as you can. If you aren't going to be doing any 'Hard' off roading, an X will probably suit you just fine. Keep in mind that the Dana 44 axles (std front and rear in a rubicon, opt. rear (get it) on sport, N/A on X) are not compatible with ABS, so you can't get it.

Don't worry about what tires you get 'standard'. X's get smaller tires than Sports or Rubicons, but when I bought mine, they'd swap them for you, even if it wasn't an 'option' on the model you were looking at. You're dealer will probably do the same.

Hopefully you aren't stuck on the $5-6k range you listed later. You can't touch a Wrangler in good condition for that. Either get a mid-70'+ CJ, or use it as a down payment. Remember, because of the resale value, you'll never be 'upside down'.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:18:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:

Originally Posted By Sierra_Hombre:
wranglers are for high school girls and frat boys, ESPECIALLY automatics. get a cj with eight cylinders.



AR15s are only for criminals too...



geez, what a silly statement. how many people have used ar15s during crimes in the past five years?
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:22:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:

Originally Posted By Sierra_Hombre:
wranglers are for high school girls and frat boys, ESPECIALLY automatics. get a cj with eight cylinders.



AR15s are only for criminals too...



+1.

A stock YJ will run circles around a stock CJ, and a stock TJ will run circles around both.

However, it is easier to modify a CJ than a YJ or TJ. Well, maybe not easier, but cheaper. The 'swap a 350' in approach (There really aren't that many CJ's out there with factory 8's, the I-6 was always the big seller) can really defeat the reliability that this poster is looking for.

Though I must say, dropping a 454 (It will fit) in a TJ is one of the coolest things out there.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:29:37 AM EST
Mine is a 2001 4.0, 5 speed. I LOVE it. Bullet proof, fast enough for me, great off road, and I actually use it off road. Can't go ya no betta!

If you want any auto, get a 2003 or newer, its a 4 speed that is much much better. But get a STICK!
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:35:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By ASUsax:
Hopefully you aren't stuck on the $5-6k range you listed later. You can't touch a Wrangler in good condition for that. Either get a mid-70'+ CJ, or use it as a down payment. Remember, because of the resale value, you'll never be 'upside down'.



As much as I love CJs, especially my 82 Scrambler, I would probably be a little reluctant to recommend one as a daily driver. The newest CJ is now 18 years old and time and use are likely to have taken their toll. Mine is in the slow process of being restored/rebuilt/built up.

However, for $5-6k, I could find a 91-96 Cherokee XJ in very good condition to use as a daily driver. In that range you can even break into the slightly redesigned 97+ models.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:41:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By ASUsax:

Originally Posted By DriftPunch:

Originally Posted By Sierra_Hombre:
wranglers are for high school girls and frat boys, ESPECIALLY automatics. get a cj with eight cylinders.



AR15s are only for criminals too...



+1.

A stock YJ will run circles around a stock CJ, and a stock TJ will run circles around both.

However, it is easier to modify a CJ than a YJ or TJ. Well, maybe not easier, but cheaper. The 'swap a 350' in approach (There really aren't that many CJ's out there with factory 8's, the I-6 was always the big seller) can really defeat the reliability that this poster is looking for.

Though I must say, dropping a 454 (It will fit) in a TJ is one of the coolest things out there.



A 454 in a SWB Jeep is like a 20x scope on an M4. Might seem cool to some, but impractical to most. That being said, there's a 401 sitting in my garage....
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 11:55:17 AM EST
I took my '88 YJ on yet another road trip upstate to a friends house this weekend for some off road fun. As has been the case, she didn't let me down in the mud and got us home without issue. Original motor and 5 speed tranny w/160K miles. 85 mph on the highway with 33's. BTW, my friends house was hit by Charlie two weeks ago. That'll give you an idea of the water depth and mud regularity I delt with this weekend.

People who talk shit about Jeep CJ's, YJ's or TJ's obviously haven't off roaded them and are speaking without personal first hand experience.

The Rubicon is the way to go if you plan on using it for it's off road capabilities. Get the 5 speed!

The only problem with my Jeep is it has now become too small for my family, gear, and dog.
She's gonna become a trailer queen swamp machine. I haven't decided what to pull her with yet.

HS1
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 12:52:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 12:55:05 PM EST by TennVol]

The Rubicon is the way to go if you plan on using it for it's off road capabilities. Get the 5 speed!


I'll have to disagree with you on the 5 speed. You don't want to pop the clutch when you are trying to climb up an obstacle.

IMHO, the auto is the way to go.

Here is my baby at about 12,000 feet:



Edited to add: I forgot to add I have never had a mechanical problem with this Jeep. 2000 Wrangler TJ, 4.0L, 4" Skyjacker lift, 33x12.5x15 wheels.

Link Posted: 8/30/2004 1:42:35 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 1:44:49 PM EST by 7]
The ONLY drawback which led me to sell my TJ is.... not alot of storage space. I couldn't fit my AR50 in there.

When my jeep had 50 miles on it, I had already installed a 4½" RE lift, Winch, 33" Swampers and rocker guards.

Wish I had it back.

Link Posted: 8/30/2004 2:39:12 PM EST
Well if we're posting pics:



Link Posted: 8/30/2004 2:45:46 PM EST

originally posted by TennVol:
I'll have to disagree with you on the 5 speed. You don't want to pop the clutch when you are trying to climb up an obstacle.



I don't know how well the TJ is geared, but my YJ in 4-Low and 2nd gear is plenty to get me up and over an obstacle. I don't do any shifting in 4-Low, except to get into 2nd gear. If you need to shift gears while in 4-Low, something ain't right!

HS1
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 5:54:31 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 5:55:06 PM EST by 7]

Originally Posted By HighStrung1:

originally posted by TennVol:
I'll have to disagree with you on the 5 speed. You don't want to pop the clutch when you are trying to climb up an obstacle.



I don't know how well the TJ is geared, but my YJ in 4-Low and 2nd gear is plenty to get me up and over an obstacle. I don't do any shifting in 4-Low, except to get into 2nd gear. If you need to shift gears while in 4-Low, something ain't right!

HS1



Not true. With my (when I had my jeep.. sniff) 4.3 Atlas II I had a crawl ration of 80:1 and if I went with a better tranny it could easily have gone to 130:1. With a ratio like that you need 2nd and 3rd gear to go 3mph to get to the next rock.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 5:14:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By 7:

Originally Posted By HighStrung1:

originally posted by TennVol:
I'll have to disagree with you on the 5 speed. You don't want to pop the clutch when you are trying to climb up an obstacle.



I don't know how well the TJ is geared, but my YJ in 4-Low and 2nd gear is plenty to get me up and over an obstacle. I don't do any shifting in 4-Low, except to get into 2nd gear. If you need to shift gears while in 4-Low, something ain't right!

HS1



Not true. With my (when I had my jeep.. sniff) 4.3 Atlas II I had a crawl ration of 80:1 and if I went with a better tranny it could easily have gone to 130:1. With a ratio like that you need 2nd and 3rd gear to go 3mph to get to the next rock.



All are valid points, but the trails I tend to wheel on are generally between 9,000 and 13,000 feet in altitude. You tend to lose a little (actually, a lot) of power at that altitude. I always appreciate the fact I can step on the gas and not worry about what gear I needed to be in.
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