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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 9/20/2009 6:15:25 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2009 6:19:55 PM EST by NimmerMehr]
Article claims that it is ok that cursive writing is dying. so be it.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090919/ap_on_re_us/us_cursive_angst

my question is how does that work for speeding tickets, credit card, car titles,etc.

if i print where it says print and print where it says sign, is it any less valid?
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:17:34 PM EST
Your title is a little fucked up.


My signature is about half print, half cursive, and half squiggle mark.



Yes I know that is 1 1/2
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:19:53 PM EST
I worked with a kid whose "signature" was him scrawling his name in large block letters. We gave him shit about it constantly.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:19:54 PM EST
My signature isn't cursive.

It's more something from the depths of hell.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:22:41 PM EST
Originally Posted By poke4570:


My signature is about half print, half cursive, and half squiggle mark.



Yes I know that is 1 1/2




this
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:31:09 PM EST
I don't think it's written anywhere that a signature has to be in cursive. Heck you could scrawl a big X on the line and that would probably work if you had been using it consistently. I didn't have a "signature" for a long time and just printed my name on the line...it's still my handwriting and I couldn't give a crap about whether anyone approves of my penmanship.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:35:13 PM EST
Somebody is saying it's "OK" probably because a significant number of gov. school scholars can only print.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:37:12 PM EST

Originally Posted By BatcaveSouth:
Somebody is saying it's "OK" probably because a significant number of gov. school scholars can only print.

And about 75% of people who write everything in cursive shouldn't because noone including the writer can read the scribbles. This includes older generations
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:40:12 PM EST
I had a guy try to tell me that a lower case signature is not legal script, as in you don't believe what you are signing.(this went into extremely blurry conversation.)

We were both quite drunk.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:42:10 PM EST
My signature is a scribble that would be impossible to duplicate as it is never the same twice.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 6:43:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By BatcaveSouth:
Somebody is saying it's "OK" probably because a significant number of gov. school scholars can only print.

Which is truly ironic, since cursive was originally invented because people wanted a quicker way to write script.

cursive=the original lazy script
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 7:36:45 PM EST
I've lived in Alaska most of my life.

I've seen people print their names as their signature.

I saw one Native man in Nome back in 1991 sign with an X because he had not been to school a day in his life.

Link Posted: 9/20/2009 7:46:47 PM EST
Cursive is not taught in many schools these days.

My signature varies from reasonable cursive on gov't forms to swirls and gibberish on CC reciepts etc.

I wouldn't want to try to read Arfcom if it were written in every poster's cursive.Well,the 5 threads a day about the proper way to make a Q or G would kick the shit out of any Glock vs 1911 threads of hate.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:09:33 PM EST
My signature is two humpy squiggles. Nothing that even resembles a letter in there. Just a couple lines.


I have gotten into agruments with min wage clerks a time or two about it. I tell them I could draw a smilie face if I wanted and it would be legal. You signature can look like whatever the hell you want it to.


Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:10:51 PM EST
I believe Florida law (and many other states and the common law, generally) allow for a "mark" in the place of a spelled name even.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:14:24 PM EST
Rurruto?
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:15:59 PM EST
Mine has a legible first letter of my name, printed, then some squiggles, then my middle initial, printed, then the first letter of my last name, printed and finally some squiggles. Anybody who tells me how to sign my name can kiss my ass. A signature is what the signator says it is.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:16:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2009 8:18:44 PM EST by JoshAston]


Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:16:59 PM EST
My writing has evolved (devolved?) into a hybrid of cursive and print. I can read it and, for the most part, that's all that matters. I do get thrown off a bit and have to concentrate in the rare situation where my handwriting will be read by someone else, i.e., a card for a coworker or filling out a 4473.

My "signature" or "mark" is all cursive and damn-near illegible.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:18:37 PM EST

Originally Posted By heffelfinger007:
Rurruto?


Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:18:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By joe-bananas:
I've lived in Alaska most of my life.

I've seen people print their names as their signature.

I saw one Native man in Nome back in 1991 sign with an X because he had not been to school a day in his life.



I used to work with a guy who signed things with an X because he couldnt read or write too. I think he had more problems than just that, though.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:20:04 PM EST
That reminds me of this guy

funny read
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:28:28 PM EST
I'm a swiggily line guy.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:36:26 PM EST
At one place I used to work, a couple of guys had to be coached on how to properly make their X.

Okay, so I'm exaggerating a little. We did however, have to teach them how to write their names.

No, these weren't mexicans. Just good ole american rednecks who didn't have time for school when they were kids.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:53:13 PM EST
My cursive was always terrible.

After the 2nd grade the nuns required all home work to be done in cursive. Once I got into high school, most of the teachers, aside from the few nuns, didn't care and the more important work had to be typed out. Since then I haven't used it in years. There are times when I think about trying to find an old cursive work book and spending some time getting back into using it.

That being said, I always look forward to Christmas or Birthday cards from my Dad. His cursive is very neat and is really interesting to look at.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 9:15:30 PM EST
I've seen a man "make his mark" on a 4473, just a few months ago. I was told that he had to quit school and go to work in a mill when he was a kid, and never was able to go back to school. The guy in the gunshop had to read him the questions, and to sign it, he used his thumbprint.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 9:24:07 PM EST
my BIL sig looks like hair on a piece of paper
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 9:26:33 PM EST
I used to sign stuff with my left hand just to piss off the Dean of Students. I hated her and I had brass balls wasn't very smart at the time.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 9:43:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By Zardoz:
I've seen a man "make his mark" on a 4473, just a few months ago. I was told that he had to quit school and go to work in a mill when he was a kid, and never was able to go back to school. The guy in the gunshop had to read him the questions, and to sign it, he used his thumbprint.


This seems to be more common than many people would tend to think. The ones I'm thinking of were back in the mid '80's, and at that time they were middle aged men from small country towns in Tennessee. They were not stupid people at all. They just had a hard upbringing and had to work as kids.

I had the pleasure of helping one of those guys learn to read. I heard from someone else a few years later that the guy eventually got his GED. He was one determined bastard, 'cause we worked looong hours in that rock quarry, and that was before there was any such thing as online courses on the internet.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 9:50:01 PM EST
My signature has a cursive Z in it. My name does not.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 9:53:04 PM EST
Seen it often and a few Xs used to sign checks.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 9:58:40 PM EST
I bartend and get back signed credit card slips all the time. The only time I see someone sign in print or even in a legible script, its usually a girl who dots her i's with hearts. Everything else is pretty much unreadable, but hey, so is my signature.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 10:04:22 PM EST
After being in the military for awhile, I started to add my rank and a warfare device to the end of my signature. I needed an affidavit notarized, so I went to BASE legal, and when it came time for me to sign, I signed (which is 'initial-squiggle-initial-squiggle-initial-squiggle and rank+device) and before I signed the second line, she asked me what was after (the rank and warfare device add less than 1/8" to my sig) my signature, so I told her. She demanded that I not put that after my name, because "it wasn't part of my signature".

So I signed with it anyways, and told her my signature was anything I wanted it to be.

Link Posted: 9/20/2009 10:39:54 PM EST
Originally Posted By Sykkone:
(snip)

So I signed with it anyways, and told her my signature was anything I wanted it to be.





Link Posted: 9/20/2009 10:41:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2009 10:51:49 PM EST by Sub-MOA]
When I worked for Apple, they gave us these little stamps for signing the final test report on a P.C. or laptop that was about to be shipped... It had a tiny apple logo on it with a four digit number.

The test reports never left the building. It was simply a way for apple to track problem builds or slack ass employees that didn't run the tests.

It struck me that snagging someone else's stamp would be much easier than forging a signature... So I ask the lead tech "Why do we use these stamps?" The answer kind of shocked me: "We got tired of having to teach people how to sign their name legibly."

After I had worked there for about six months, I realised that swiping stamps actually happened very little. Mostly what did happen was that the shittier techs would simply apply a thumbnail to the numbers until you could not read them. When they got called out for having the forms stamped illegibly, they would claim that their stamp wore out.

Mind you, these guys were all getting paid more than $18 an hour (This was '94 too) and they represented the best people Apple could aqquire...
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 10:46:15 PM EST
My sig looks like somebody dropped a sharpie and tried to catch it but failed
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 11:07:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2009 11:08:35 PM EST by Aimless]
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 11:15:55 PM EST
After a motorcycle accident, a bar fight and a work accident all in the same year, I decided that actually writing my name out was a waste so I just scrawled it out in a series of zig-zags with my initials at the front. I actually changed my signature cards at the bank to reflect this. Now even with casts on I can sign my name on the rare occasion I need to.

So yeah, "cursive" is dead. Signatures are whatever you want them to be. Give kids a few days of instruction on how to sign their name, teach them how to print, then focus on stuff they need like keyboarding. Why teach useless skills?
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 11:18:06 PM EST
I have an awesome signature (at least, I think so) and I can pick out each letter from it and tell you what it is. However, I haven't found a person yet who can read the damn thing
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 11:33:45 PM EST
after the military I write mostly in block print hehe

And my signature is illegible

Link Posted: 9/20/2009 11:35:03 PM EST


did you mean unintelligible?


Link Posted: 9/20/2009 11:44:53 PM EST
I sign whatever name I feel like.

It's still my signature.

Link Posted: 9/21/2009 12:00:26 AM EST
I don't sign the CC machine...I use the corner/edge of the card and just make a straight line across the sig line area. It always works.
If the card is misused and someone fakes a signature, it'll be the ONLY signature ever used on the account.
Link Posted: 9/21/2009 12:16:13 AM EST
Honestly, I don't remember the last time I wrote anything by hand. And probably haven't used cursive since 3rd grade, and other than the letters in my name, I really don't think I actually remember the entire cursive alphabet.
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