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11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/20/2004 4:11:14 PM EST
just wondering the manual of my xbox says not too. I can't see harm unless you left the game paused or played for many hours. but I could be wrong, anybody had the picture burn into the actually set?
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 4:22:23 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 4:24:47 PM EST
it sucks. you can only do 800x600 and built-in converters on most video cards have crappy quality.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 4:27:19 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 4:29:42 PM EST
do you have a vga input on your tv?
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 4:31:12 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 5:31:15 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 5:37:32 PM EST
Most rear projectors that use traditional tube/lenses (single or tri-tube) will suffer image burn after only a few years of use (even less if used with video games). Digital Light Projectors, like Samsung, will not. LCDs don't, but they suffer from lack of contrast/dynamic range.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 5:46:26 PM EST
I burned something into my screen. It is very faint, but it is there. Like some sort of circle where you would see a power line, or something on an xbox game. It can happen if you play alot of it. So yes you can burn an image on it with the xbox. But unless you play 7 hours a night like I used to, then you should be fine.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 5:52:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
It takes HUNDREDS of hours with a static image on the screen for the screen burn to be noticeable if your set's settings are in the range they should be. If you've got the brightness and contrast cranked, it can take much less time, but having the settings set up like that is pure ABUSE of the equipment anyway.

CJ



Good point on the brightness and contrast levels. Most people have no idea where these should be set on their TV. I used an Avia disc to calibrate mine. It looks pretty good now, and both brightness and contrast are at around 30-40%.
Link Posted: 8/20/2004 5:54:07 PM EST

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
It can cause burns on the phosphor layer on the CRTs. The problem is the parts of the images that never move, like the score box.

The "watermark" that many TV networks put on their channel can cause the same problem, incidentally.


If you want to play your games on the big screen, you can do it safely, but first, drop the brightness and contrast down a few notches. (They shouldn't ever be up more than halfway in any event!!!!) And don't leave the game on the screen if nobody's actually playing it. REALLY.

I fly flight simulators on my home theater Really Big Screen. (8 foot wide screen, with a front projection system) I've never had any issues but I don't leave it on all the time, either. I fire it up, fly for a while, and then shut it down.

CJ



+1.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 3:42:23 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 9:47:20 AM EST
Only problem with CRT is size and weight. I have a hi-def tube TV. 34" widescreen, and the thing weighs 170 pounds. Still can't beat CRT for image quality tho.
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:11:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:

Originally Posted By AlphaBobRI:
Most rear projectors that use traditional tube/lenses (single or tri-tube) will suffer image burn after only a few years of use (even less if used with video games). Digital Light Projectors, like Samsung, will not. LCDs don't, but they suffer from lack of contrast/dynamic range.



True....but have you priced the lamps for DLP projectors lately? It's not unusual for your
lamp operating costs to exceed a dollar an hour.

DLP will be ready for prime time when the light source problem is solved, which I think will
be soon thanks to the development of super long life LED based lamps. Modern LEDs are
available in all colors including white. and the brightness levels are getting ridiculous.
It's only a matter of time before excellent, color temperature correct, high intensity LED
lamps make their entry into the projection market. And they'll last as long as any other part
of the projector if they don't get power spiked.

Right now, top quality CRT projectors still are the high water mark in image quality, but DLP
has gained a lot of ground in just a few short years. When my CRT based projectors are
finally ready to be retired, DLP will certainly be ready even for my demanding standards.

CJ



My Infocus DLP lamp is rated at 3k hours and costs $350. I can live with $0.12/hr. It's great with the XBox in HDTV mode!
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:17:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/21/2004 10:18:36 AM EST by cmjohnson]
Link Posted: 8/21/2004 10:49:51 AM EST
I bought my bigscreen specifically to play video games on, as I don't really watch that much TV. Ive had it about a year and no problems so far "knock on wood".
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