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Posted: 8/29/2004 11:36:54 AM EST
www.betterhumans.com/News/news.aspx?articleID=2004-08-20-1


"Real World" Quantum Teleportation Achieved
Photons linked across Danube in long-distance experiment
By Gabe Romain
Betterhumans Staff
8/20/2004 3:03 PM
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In a step towards realizing the promise of quantum communication and computing, researchers have successfully teleported photons underneath the river Danube in Austria.

Rupert Ursin and colleagues at the University of Vienna in Austria connected two labs on opposite sides of the famous river with an 800 meter-long optical fiber laid under the water, then transferred the properties of one particle to another.

Significantly, say the researchers, the experiment took place under "real world" conditions, which is very important for the realization of quantum-based applications.

Quantum entanglement

In science fiction, teleportation involves moving objects from one place to another by encoding information about them, transmitting the information to another place and creating a copy of the originals in the new location, like a three-dimensional fax machine.

In quantum mechanics, teleportation relies on the laws of physics that apply at very small scales. Quantum teleportation exploits a quantum mechanical phenomenon known as entanglement, in which the quantum states of two or more objects are somehow connected no matter how far apart their distance.

Entanglement holds promise for quantum computing. Unlike bits used in today's computers, quantum bits, or qubits, can have shared states. Because of this, two entangled qubits can store much more information than bits. In addition, because of the instantaneous communication between qubits, information transfer would be much faster.

Photon relay

For the study, Ursin and colleagues created a link between two labs on opposite sides of the Danube with an optical fiber fed through a sewer system tunnel. The link enabled the properties of photons (particles of light) to be transferred between the sender and the receiver.

To create a pair of entangled photons, the researchers fired a laser through a barium borate crystal. When the researchers separated the entangled photons, they were able to transport the information about the state of one photon to the other.

The results, say the researchers, are a step towards implementing something called a quantum repeater.

Sending photons entangled in a quantum state only works over a limited distance—photons start to lose their quantum state beyond distances of about 15 kilometers.

Quantum repeaters could overcome this problem by temporarily storing a photon's state. Like a relay race in which a baton is transferred to a fresh runner after a certain distance, new photons could be generated at each repeater, allowing long distance travel over a number of short steps.

The research is reported in the journal Nature (read abstract).

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 11:39:13 AM EST
Does this mean they sent a message from one place to another in a time shorter than it would have taken light to make the same trip?

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 11:41:03 AM EST
Um, would it be possible to teleport some PIE to my house? In the interest of science, of course.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 11:50:55 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 11:55:45 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 12:03:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 12:03:58 PM EST by Terrato]
[homer simpson] So it only transports matter...? [/homer simpson]
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:32:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By raven:
Um, would it be possible to teleport some PIE to my house? In the interest of science, of course.



Sorry the best they could do would be to send you video of pie.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:38:43 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:40:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 1:41:13 PM EST by FOX-]

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By raven:
Um, would it be possible to teleport some PIE to my house? In the interest of science, of course.

Before come back bring pie.



I think its "When come back bring PIE!!!"
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:42:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By raven:
Um, would it be possible to teleport some PIE to my house? In the interest of science, of course.

Before come back bring pie.

lmao!
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:42:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 1:43:46 PM EST by olyarms]
This is kind of old. They having been doing this shit for years. I think mainly light however. Still pretty cool.
But how can you teleport me using quantum physics? Maybe I don't understand quantum physics that well but isn't it really really small shit. And how it doesn't have the same laws as us bigger shits?
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:44:49 PM EST
Its been done before, just they added the fiber line underwater this time. It will make quauntum encryption ranges better.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:47:21 PM EST
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.

Why? Theoretically there should be NO range limit

The more we know it seems the more we don't understand...
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:53:00 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:59:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 1:59:57 PM EST by Donna]
Everyone please contribute to research funding for this technology RIGHT NOW!

My long distance relationship would be a lot easier to manage!!

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 2:06:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.



Scotty, this is the Captain, beam me down to 185 miles above the planets surface……

Andy
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 4:41:12 PM EST

Originally Posted By vito113:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.



Scotty, this is the Captain, beam me down to 185 miles above the planets surface……

Andy



quantum resistance?
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 5:52:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.

Why? Theoretically there should be NO range limit

The more we know it seems the more we don't understand...



Fiber optics isn't perfect medium, however it should go a helluva lot farther than 15km.




The way I understood entanglement, if you
were to move two entangled particles to
opposite ends of the universe, when one
particle's state changes, the other particle's
state changes immediately. Therefore, info
had been sent faster than the speed of light.

I'm not sure where fiber optics comes into
play...
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 5:55:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By TheCynic:

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.

Why? Theoretically there should be NO range limit

The more we know it seems the more we don't understand...



Fiber optics isn't perfect medium, however it should go a helluva lot farther than 15km.




The way I understood entanglement, if you
were to move two entangled particles to
opposite ends of the universe, when one
particle's state changes, the other particle's
state changes immediately. Therefore, info
had been sent faster than the speed of light.

I'm not sure where fiber optics comes into
play...




yeah, that's why I asked that question in my post above.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:01:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:

Sorry the best they could do would be to send you video of pie.



Then I humbly request a video of necromancer pie....I think....

Chris
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:07:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By GrumpyM4:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:

Sorry the best they could do would be to send you video of pie.



Then I humbly request a video of necromancer pie....I think....

Chris



+1

So tasty I bet
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:14:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 6:22:26 PM EST by FunYun1983]
Quantum entanglement is what they did to the photons. When done to photons they only have a range of 15km's, if they had used something else they could change the range.

Quantum entanglement can affect any two or more objects. So they just used photons cause of their ease to produce with lasers.

I can only assume that they used fiber optics because it is the only way to control particals of light. Rember, the whole point of this is to transfer information between objects. Therefor you must move one of the entangled photons, this is what the fiber optics is for.


exp:

Make photons with laser
entangle two of them
move one of the photons through the fiber optics
change one photon and whatch the other one magicly change
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:14:56 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:15:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By TheCynic:

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.

Why? Theoretically there should be NO range limit

The more we know it seems the more we don't understand...



Fiber optics isn't perfect medium, however it should go a helluva lot farther than 15km.




The way I understood entanglement, if you
were to move two entangled particles to
opposite ends of the universe, when one
particle's state changes, the other particle's
state changes immediately. Therefore, info
had been sent faster than the speed of light.

I'm not sure where fiber optics comes into
play...



This is my take,

The University of Vienna is able to apply the state of one photon to the state of another photon on the other end of the fiber. They take that photon and trasmit it via fiber. The recieving end recieves one entangled photon. With this style they arebe able to get above able to pysically move the two states apart.

brb
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:22:28 PM EST
Old news.

They 1st did this several years ago. Probably not over the same distance but...........
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:26:52 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:04:04 PM EST

Originally Posted By vito113:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.



Scotty, this is the Captain, beam me down to 185 miles above the planets surface……

Andy



That's why the security guards always went first - just in case Scotty hit the scotch a little too hard the night before.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:21:27 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 7:34:11 PM EST by fizassist]

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.

Why? Theoretically there should be NO range limit

The more we know it seems the more we don't understand...



That's pretty easy (quantumly speaking). Some quantum states aren't stable; they oscillate over time. This is the whole issue with neutrino production from the sun. The generally accepted view is that neutrinos are produced in flavor eigenstates, and these are linear combinations of mass (i.e. physical) eigenstates. That means that, no matter the flavor eigenstate of production, there is a finite probability of osciallation to a different mass eigenstate. Thus the number of neutrinos of a given mass (physical) eigenstate we detect on earth is different from the naive expectation based on knowledge of the sun's nuclear chemistry.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 8:57:23 PM EST

Originally Posted By fizassist:

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Whats interesting is this 15km range limit that has turned up.

Why? Theoretically there should be NO range limit

The more we know it seems the more we don't understand...



That's pretty easy (quantumly speaking). Some quantum states aren't stable; they oscillate over time. This is the whole issue with neutrino production from the sun. The generally accepted view is that neutrinos are produced in flavor eigenstates, and these are linear combinations of mass (i.e. physical) eigenstates. That means that, no matter the flavor eigenstate of production, there is a finite probability of osciallation to a different mass eigenstate. Thus the number of neutrinos of a given mass (physical) eigenstate we detect on earth is different from the naive expectation based on knowledge of the sun's nuclear chemistry.



and the previous limit was increased from a few inches (across wire) to 15 km(fiber) because they were using electrons at the time. Well they found out that electrons are not very stable (quantumly speaking). So in this project the range was increased to 15km because they used photons, which are more stable yet have similar properties as electrons.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 9:00:27 PM EST
So, they connected two labs with a long fiber optic cable and shined light through it? Fucking amazing!
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 9:00:37 PM EST
I wonder how they were able to view the qbit? because once you observe a quantum entanglement- you change it, just by being there. hmmm....anyone know what im talking about?
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 9:01:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 9:01:59 PM EST by gaspain]

Originally Posted By SNorman:
So, they connected two labs with a long fiber optic cable and shined light through it? Fucking amazing!



yes it is amazing! the photon was an exact replica of the other photon!
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 9:03:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By gaspain:

Originally Posted By SNorman:
So, they connected two labs with a long fiber optic cable and shined light through it? Fucking amazing!



yes it is amazing! the photon was an exact replica of the other photon!



Light "particle"? OK.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 9:05:32 PM EST

Originally Posted By SNorman:

Originally Posted By gaspain:

Originally Posted By SNorman:
So, they connected two labs with a long fiber optic cable and shined light through it? Fucking amazing!



yes it is amazing! the photon was an exact replica of the other photon!



Light "particle"? OK.



Which means you just transmitted a bit of data instantaniously across distance, faster than it could move through the copper or silicon circuts in your computer....
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 9:11:49 PM EST
SNorman, think of it this way,
instantaneous pr0n through megaphat quantum pipes.
No BW limit.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 9:18:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 9:21:55 PM EST by gaspain]
I just thought of a way to explain this in lay terms.

Bob is going to send a fax to Joe. Bob writes "I need more ammo." on the paper. Bob puts the paper in the fax machine and clicks send on the machine. The copy is transmitted across the phone line to Joe. A few seconds later Joe recieves the fax and reads "I need more ammo." Bob then takes the original paper from the machine and writes statement "P.S. I also need more pie!" And as Joe has his copy in his hands the letters magically appear on the paper as Bob is writing them out, with every stoke of the pen Joe gets the info and then the rest of the message appears instantly "P.S. I also need more pie!"
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