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Posted: 3/9/2010 3:59:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/9/2010 4:06:33 PM EDT by Uberjager]
Here's some background info: I'm a HS senior with 3hrs of college credit. I have a pretty good ACT score, and a good GPA. I'm fairly good at math, I'm in Calc I, and I could graduate with up to 14 additional college credits. I enjoy crunching numbers, solving problems, looking at ways to create higher effeciency, and tinkering around with things.

I am fascinated by Aerospace, Mechanical, and Petroleum engineering. I think all 3 are damn cool. I also have relatives, who are in all the aforementioned fields, and they fuel my passions. Has anyone been in my boat before? Is anyone in the above fields?

BTW: I know Petroleum Engineering could have me in either Cold Balls, Russia or paradise South America.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:00:33 PM EDT
Tag. I'm going for Mechanical Engineering right now, but may want to go Nuclear (maybe, politics may kill this future).
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:00:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/9/2010 4:01:43 PM EDT by marksman121]
Some Aero guys also end up having a double major with Mech due to taking the same classes. But Mech does not always transfer the other way.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:01:57 PM EDT
I'm in for Mechancial engineering. It wasn't what I thought it was. Maybe the jobs will be cool but the classes are pretty gay for the most part.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:05:01 PM EDT
It's really not all that much different. Same rules in all of them.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:06:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By usptac:
Tag. I'm going for Mechanical Engineering right now, but may want to go Nuclear (maybe, politics may kill this future).


Updated the title.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:08:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Originally Posted By usptac:
Tag. I'm going for Mechanical Engineering right now, but may want to go Nuclear (maybe, politics may kill this future).


Updated the title.


IIRC it is getting harder to find places offering Nuclear.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:09:40 PM EDT
If you have an interest in the petroleum business, consider other mineral resource fields as well, including (of course) utility metals and precious metals.


Think about future demands. You want to get into a field that pays well and the demand is likely to be steady, at the very least. Increasing demand is ideal.


With petroleum being on the "hit list" of technologies that there's a push AWAY from dependency on, I can't give that industry the highest recommendation.


But the demand for metal resources won't diminish.


CJ
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:09:54 PM EDT
I have my Undergrad in Mechanical, getting Master's in Aeronautical. Doing the ARFCOM thing and getting both!
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:13:49 PM EDT
I'm a software developer. I wanted to be a mechanical engineer. 10 years after graduating from college, I've found that software, as much as I didn't want to do it, has paid off far better than being an engineer would have. Most engineers I know get hired by a company and put through years of specialized training making them no more valuable to any other firm if they were to leave (not to mention, you'd likely be under some strict non-compete, privacy contracts to keep you form working for anyone that would find you valuable). The standard line from people going into engineering is, "well, I don't want to sit in front of a computer all day..." In these days, that's exactly what you'd be doing.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:14:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By usptac:
Tag. I'm going for Mechanical Engineering right now, but may want to go Nuclear (maybe, politics may kill this future).


Stay OUT of Nuclear
Nuclear Eng Tech here
I drive a service truck [://
over 20 years in the bis
Outsourced then RIF
I just don't want to move anymore and once out its move or find something else

There where plenty of Mech E and EE at the plant and they can got to work anywhere

I wish I had gone EMS (Emergency Mangt Services now)
Ex Navy and we kill the What ifs
I might look into that yet
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:14:26 PM EDT
Service academies might be work a look, assuming you have the extracurricular activities to have a good chance of admission.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:14:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
If you have an interest in the petroleum business, consider other mineral resource fields as well, including (of course) utility metals and precious metals.


Think about future demands. You want to get into a field that pays well and the demand is likely to be steady, at the very least. Increasing demand is ideal.


With petroleum being on the "hit list" of technologies that there's a push AWAY from dependency on, I can't give that industry the highest recommendation.


But the demand for metal resources won't diminish.


CJ

There will still be a demand for petroleum, not just for oil to be used for cars, but oil for polymers. There's also a few petroleum engineers I know who are solely focused on natural gas. The pay is damn good, $83k a year is the starting salary.

Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:16:31 PM EDT
Put any thought into Civil?
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:18:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/9/2010 4:20:33 PM EDT by Baldmonk]
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Here's some background info: I'm a HS senior with 3hrs of college credit. I have a pretty good ACT score, and a good GPA. I'm fairly good at math, I'm in Calc I, and I could graduate with up to 14 additional college credits. I enjoy crunching numbers, solving problems, looking at ways to create higher effeciency, and tinkering around with things.

I am fascinated by Aerospace, Mechanical, and Petroleum engineering. I think all 3 are damn cool. I also have relatives, who are in all the aforementioned fields, and they fuel my passions. Has anyone been in my boat before? Is anyone in the above fields?

BTW: I know Petroleum Engineering could have me in either Cold Balls, Russia or paradise South America.


Get the Mechanical if you want employment. Nuclear, Petroleum, and Aero are just Mechanical specilizations / branches. Never over specilize. You have no Idea what you will be doing in 10 to 20 years. One thing for sure it won't be what you plan on.

Just my 2 cents.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:18:50 PM EDT
Aerospace engineering will never go out of style. You should also look into Chem E., they can make freakin BANK after they graduate.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:19:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Argon3:
Originally Posted By usptac:
Tag. I'm going for Mechanical Engineering right now, but may want to go Nuclear (maybe, politics may kill this future).


Stay OUT of Nuclear
Nuclear Eng Tech here
I drive a service truck [://
over 20 years in the bis
Outsourced then RIF
I just don't want to move anymore and once out its move or find something else

There where plenty of Mech E and EE at the plant and they can got to work anywhere

I wish I had gone EMS (Emergency Mangt Services now)
Ex Navy and we kill the What ifs
I might look into that yet




Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:21:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Put any thought into Civil?


I've thought about that quite a bit too... and I have 2 cousins who are civil engineers. One works for CDOT and the other deals with water management.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:23:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Here's some background info: I'm a HS senior with 3hrs of college credit. I have a pretty good ACT score, and a good GPA. I'm fairly good at math, I'm in Calc I, and I could graduate with up to 14 additional college credits. I enjoy crunching numbers, solving problems, looking at ways to create higher effeciency, and tinkering around with things.

I am fascinated by Aerospace, Mechanical, and Petroleum engineering. I think all 3 are damn cool. I also have relatives, who are in all the aforementioned fields, and they fuel my passions. Has anyone been in my boat before? Is anyone in the above fields?

BTW: I know Petroleum Engineering could have me in either Cold Balls, Russia or paradise South America.


With your PE degree you could always end up in the field in places such as.... Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi, etc. etc.

Don't believe the BS about ending up sitting next to a fire pit in the middle of nowhere and having to dogsled to pick up a pack of smokes.

The truth is that if you end up with a P.E. Degree and have the desire to get outside of the office and sit in the field you will earn over 1000 dollars a day, have endless perks with all the service company reps trying to bribe you, and live in a nice comfy trailer. All you do is plug numbers into a computer every morning at 5am and call service companies to come out and do what they need to do. If the well starts to blow or has issues you spring into action with your degree and specialized schooling and save the day.

Get good enough and you will be making 1500 a day and working a 14 on 7 off schedule with your wife staying in the trailer with you if you want her around.

It's a sweet gig. I really wish I had gone to college instead of going off-shore to earn money at 18.

IM me if you want more info, I can put you in contact with a couple of friendly PE's.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:24:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Put any thought into Civil?


I've thought about that quite a bit too... and I have 2 cousins who are civil engineers. One works for CDOT and the other deals with water management.


How do they like it? It always seemed a bit boring to me. Does it mesh with their personalities?

Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:26:15 PM EDT
If you are good at math and like tinkering with stuff and making things more efficient, go Mechanical. Lots of good jobs out their for Mechanical Engineers and they certainly make good money.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:28:07 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TexasDoubleTap:

*snip*



usptac quietly rearranges priorities to obtain a P.E. degree
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:29:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By marksman121:
Some Aero guys also end up having a double major with Mech due to taking the same classes. But Mech does not always transfer the other way.

That's what I did.


Aero was my original major and added Mech since I knocked out most of the core classes already
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:29:23 PM EDT
Mechanical will make you more marketable, and you will be better prepared to deal with whims of what society wants at any given time.


Spoken by an Aero. Not that I regret my choice. But alot of my college buddies did as the mechanical guys got jobs and alot of aeros didn't.


Any way you go, bust your butt and make sure you get co-ops or internships. This market (jobs) is going suck for a while.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:33:26 PM EDT
Petroleum is gonna get you the most money...

Mechanical...I dunno...I was in Mechanical Engineering for awhile. I wanted to design cool things....but when I went around asking different companies about internships they either said we don't need any ME's right now or yes, you can help do our HVAC. Checked in the area and...the only real ME jobs were for things like HVAC...killed my boner pretty quick.

If you want to do ME...check in your area for some jobs that sound interesting that you could stand doing for a awhile.

Also, all engineering fields have a general set of core classes that you have to take: Calc I - IV, Physics, Chemistry, etc. Sometimes...you don't need to really declare for focus until Sophomore year. That could give you time to experience college and get a better idea of the field you wanna study.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:40:33 PM EDT
My degree is AE and I love working in aerospace, but I have always been into aviation so it was sort of a no-brainer for me. The industry is rather cyclical, so you have to be prepared for that.

There is a significant difference between AE and ME degrees - an AE degree is fairly narrow in its focus and is not (as I think a lot of people expect) just an ME degree with a couple aerodynamics classes. Even structural classes, materials labs, and your basic fluid mechanics class will be aimed specifically at aerospace, so you won't see certain things that most MEs will see. Between these two, I think you should really decide whether or not you want to work in aerospace - if yes, AE, otherwise ME. That's not to say we don't have any MEs where I work, but I think you would be better served by getting the right degree for the job.

Today, I would lean toward nuclear, just based on my expectation of the job market. I've actually considered making the change, but just refuse to spend the money/time on another degree if I don't have to.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:41:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/9/2010 4:44:54 PM EDT by marksman121]
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Put any thought into Civil?


I've thought about that quite a bit too... and I have 2 cousins who are civil engineers. One works for CDOT and the other deals with water management.


Civil is a wide field and you could end up doing roads, bridges, buildings,....lots of opportunities.

eta- if the job market is still bad looking into ROTC to cover some of it would not be a bad idea. Going into an engineering branch would give you experience and 4/5 more years for the market to improve.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:43:37 PM EDT
Mechanical Engineering or Electrical Engineering.

Aero, Nuke, and Petro are too specialized. We haven't had any new nuke plants in forever and Obammy just closed the one facility to store nuclear waste in the long term. Libs hate Petro.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:44:26 PM EDT
Chemical. Best pay and widest field. Can work in almost any industry.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:45:39 PM EDT
Any electrical engineers here???
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 4:57:00 PM EDT
I'm an M.E. You can pretty much go anywhere you want as a Mech with the right qualifications for the particular job. If you've got the degree, you've already demonstrated a capacity for learning and an understanding of the fundamentals.

As somebody above stated, you don't want to over-specialize. I don't sit at a desk all day. I actually do more "tech" work than I probably should as an engineer, but it fits my persona as I'm a very hands-on guy. However, looking around I've found several possible jobs that I could qualify for based on experience and education that may not be "M.E.-only" listings.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 5:03:36 PM EDT
my friend was an aerospace major until he realized the job market is super tight compared to mechanical
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 5:48:20 PM EDT
Thanks guys!
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 6:43:12 PM EDT
First two years of a BS engineering degree are about the same. Go to a school that offers the disciplines that interest you and take a 101 class in each.

SRM
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 6:51:37 PM EDT

I have been in the engineering field for 30 years. I am considered a "technichian" and dont have a college degree but if I had to give anyone advice I would say "Electrical Engineering".
When I first started out all controls were mechanical. Everything is electrical now. PLC's control everything.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 7:00:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By tamu94:
Chemical. Best pay and widest field. Can work in almost any industry.


no offense, but I disagree with that one. I've got Chemical Engineering friends from college who had a hard time getting a job, and it wasn't b/c of their grades.

That said, I am a Mechanical Engineer, had a choice of jobs, in different fields, and am currently working as a Petroleum Engineer, just a little over a year and a half out of school and am looking at international work. In High School, I thought about Agricultural or Areo Engineering, but decided on ME b/c of more job opportunities after college, including where Areo and AG go to work.

Also, if you really want Nuclear, think about a minor. My ME department brought it back my last year, b/c of the foretasted need in the industry.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 8:09:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TexasDoubleTap:
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Here's some background info: I'm a HS senior with 3hrs of college credit. I have a pretty good ACT score, and a good GPA. I'm fairly good at math, I'm in Calc I, and I could graduate with up to 14 additional college credits. I enjoy crunching numbers, solving problems, looking at ways to create higher effeciency, and tinkering around with things.

I am fascinated by Aerospace, Mechanical, and Petroleum engineering. I think all 3 are damn cool. I also have relatives, who are in all the aforementioned fields, and they fuel my passions. Has anyone been in my boat before? Is anyone in the above fields?

BTW: I know Petroleum Engineering could have me in either Cold Balls, Russia or paradise South America.


With your PE degree you could always end up in the field in places such as.... Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi, etc. etc.

Don't believe the BS about ending up sitting next to a fire pit in the middle of nowhere and having to dogsled to pick up a pack of smokes.

The truth is that if you end up with a P.E. Degree and have the desire to get outside of the office and sit in the field you will earn over 1000 dollars a day, have endless perks with all the service company reps trying to bribe you, and live in a nice comfy trailer. All you do is plug numbers into a computer every morning at 5am and call service companies to come out and do what they need to do. If the well starts to blow or has issues you spring into action with your degree and specialized schooling and save the day.

Get good enough and you will be making 1500 a day and working a 14 on 7 off schedule with your wife staying in the trailer with you if you want her around.

It's a sweet gig. I really wish I had gone to college instead of going off-shore to earn money at 18.

IM me if you want more info, I can put you in contact with a couple of friendly PE's.

That's basically what I do, except I don't make that much money............yet.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 8:29:03 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Argon3:
Originally Posted By usptac:
Tag. I'm going for Mechanical Engineering right now, but may want to go Nuclear (maybe, politics may kill this future).


Stay OUT of Nuclear
Nuclear Eng Tech here
I drive a service truck [://
over 20 years in the bis
Outsourced then RIF
I just don't want to move anymore and once out its move or find something else

There where plenty of Mech E and EE at the plant and they can got to work anywhere

I wish I had gone EMS (Emergency Mangt Services now)
Ex Navy and we kill the What ifs
I might look into that yet



Not trying to be a jerk, but there is a huge difference between a tech degree and an engineering degree. A licensed PE in nuclear engineering will have a job in nuclear engineering, not driving a truck. I work at a company that is one of the leaders in power plant design and construction and our nuclear engineers design nuclear reactors and plants.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 8:34:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Originally Posted By marksman121:
Put any thought into Civil?


I've thought about that quite a bit too... and I have 2 cousins who are civil engineers. One works for CDOT and the other deals with water management.


Civil is a wide field and you could end up doing roads, bridges, buildings,....lots of opportunities.

eta- if the job market is still bad looking into ROTC to cover some of it would not be a bad idea. Going into an engineering branch would give you experience and 4/5 more years for the market to improve.


I'm a civil/structural engineer in the energy sector. It is, in my opinion, the best engineering occupation during economic downturns. The pay is never the best, but the job security almost always is. Our nations infrastructure relies on civil engineers and our infrastructure is crumbling away. There is work and civil is a very broad field.

By the way, its the easiest of the majors too .
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 8:37:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By chargerkid5:
I'm in for Mechancial engineering. It wasn't what I thought it was. Maybe the jobs will be cool but the classes are pretty gay for the most part.


is your ass bleeding yet? if it is you are about halfway there.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 8:45:08 PM EDT
ME, you can be employed by almost all industry, so is EE, and CE.
Specialty engineer are very specialized, and is limited by the title.

FYI, I have a MSME working as senior staff engineer in a large aerospace company, classified as Aeronautical Engineer (same pay grade), and have worked on both space and aeronautical products.

Oh BTW, keep your nose clean if you want to get into Aerospace because sooner or later, you will need to get a clearance, and during downturn, the companies layoff engineers who have no clearance or low level clearance first.
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 8:48:52 PM EDT
I did two years at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with Mechanical Engineering. I was in TD63, the section that does aerodynamics for the Space Shuttle (STS). Of the 20-ish people in that section, two were Aerospace, the rest were ME.

ME can do anything other majors can do, but you may have to do a bit of background reading.

Link Posted: 3/9/2010 8:51:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/9/2010 8:51:57 PM EDT by yumbeef]
i always thought mechanical was the most flexible out of the six major disciplines: chemical (hot chicks relatively speaking), civil, aero, industrial (hot chicks relatively speaking), electical, mechanical. unless if you really want to work on a nuke powered vessel or nuke plant or work for oil service, i can't recommend nuclear or petroleum.
ETA i'm either biased (because i have a BSME), or i'm right
Link Posted: 3/10/2010 4:04:15 AM EDT
My fear with civil engineering would be that most jobs are going to be either working for a municipality or a construction firm. Municipalities are about broke right now, and construction isn't exactly hopping. Do you think things will be better in 4-5 years?

On the other hand, if everyone sees it just like I do, then there may only be a small number of new civil engineering grads in 4-5 years which could be good for you(supply/demand).




Notice I say "4-5 years." I don't know about other schools and degrees, but it was not possible to get my degree (BSAE, ERAU) in 8 semesters. Even taking over-load course schedules, prerequisites and scheduling prevent you from getting out in 4 years unless you take summer classes as well. Also, engineering schools often will not accept your AP credits for classes like physics - they'll take it as an elective credit, but you will still have to take physics I and II. You shouldn't let that affect your decision, but it's something you need to know.
Link Posted: 3/10/2010 4:53:23 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Rem700PSS:

snip

If you want to do ME...check in your area for some jobs that sound interesting that you could stand doing for a awhile.

Also, all engineering fields have a general set of core classes that you have to take: Calc I - IV, Physics, Chemistry, etc. Sometimes...you don't need to really declare for focus until Sophomore year. That could give you time to experience college and get a better idea of the field you wanna study.


OP, go the route in red if you don't know what you want to do yet...do as many core engineering classes that work for all without declaring.

Be ready for 20-30 hours of homework a week, basically doing some EVERY day.

Personally I chose Mechanical, probably enjoy the "manufacturing engineer" curriculum more though...I already had lots of practical experience there (manufacturing) and wouldn't have learned as much in those classes as Mech. Mechanical has more weight in the industry, a manufacturing eng position can get filled by a Mech Eng, but not as easy other way around...

An aero engineering position can get filled by a ME easier than most ME positions can get filled by Aero, if that makes sense. If you truly ONLY wanted to work in the aero industry, aero would be a little better, but you have to know that (many of my co-workers did, and good for them!) ––personally, I wanted to have a broader range of opportunities AND the school I wanted to go to didn't offer aero-specific majors.

Oftentimes, people say to "major in what you enjoy most" –– but sometimes, the hard truth is you need to see what is better in the market (why I didn't like specialization such as Manufacturing Engineering, Aerospace, same could go for Petro or Nuclear possibly, but I am not well-versed in those fields). Can only be determined by you though...
Link Posted: 3/10/2010 5:04:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2010 5:05:27 AM EDT by Baldmonk]
Originally Posted By ns2002:
Originally Posted By Argon3:
Originally Posted By usptac:
Tag. I'm going for Mechanical Engineering right now, but may want to go Nuclear (maybe, politics may kill this future).


Stay OUT of Nuclear
Nuclear Eng Tech here
I drive a service truck [://
over 20 years in the bis
Outsourced then RIF
I just don't want to move anymore and once out its move or find something else

There where plenty of Mech E and EE at the plant and they can got to work anywhere

I wish I had gone EMS (Emergency Mangt Services now)
Ex Navy and we kill the What ifs
I might look into that yet



Not trying to be a jerk, but there is a huge difference between a tech degree and an engineering degree. A licensed PE in nuclear engineering will have a job in nuclear engineering, not driving a truck. I work at a company that is one of the leaders in power plant design and construction and our nuclear engineers design nuclear reactors and plants.


Speak to something you know something about. A Navy trained EOW / STE Plant operator will have 20 to 30 PE Nuclear Engineers working for them at commercial power plants even if they are a Technician (no degree) ex Navy chief. Very few people with Engineering degrees can pass the STE requirements exams. Wash out rate is over 75 % even with Nuclear Engineering degrees.

Link Posted: 3/10/2010 5:23:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2010 5:37:30 AM EDT by CnA]
Have you considered Electrical Engineering, particularity in the power electronics or alternative energy field?

I have a MSEE and am employed as a Technical Specialist for Hybrid and Battery Electric vehicles. Recruiters are calling me on a daily basis looking for engineers with power electronics and battery charger credentials. There is a severe shortage of these type of engineers with an overabundance of digital or software EE's.

Being able to design a charger or inverter/motor system that can handle 100 kW or more power is an extremely marketable skill now and in the future with the progression of solar, wind, and fuel cell energy sources. Not to mention the use of high current inverters used in HEV automobiles and future military hybrid applications. Even the petroleum companies are hiring electrical engineers for their power electronics and alternative energy research.
Link Posted: 3/10/2010 5:25:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2010 5:25:31 AM EDT by The_Earl_Of_Sammich]
Electrical, Power Transmission and Distribution and or Electrical Power Generation.

It's benn badey badey gute to me. and there is a real shortage of new qualified people coming into the feild relative to the demands on the industry.

Start out at $55-$60K. Progresses rapidly from there given your drive and abilities.
Link Posted: 3/10/2010 5:28:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Uberjager:
Here's some background info: I'm a HS senior with 3hrs of college credit. I have a pretty good ACT score, and a good GPA. I'm fairly good at math, I'm in Calc I, and I could graduate with up to 14 additional college credits. I enjoy crunching numbers, solving problems, looking at ways to create higher effeciency, and tinkering around with things.

I am fascinated by Aerospace, Mechanical, and Petroleum engineering. I think all 3 are damn cool. I also have relatives, who are in all the aforementioned fields, and they fuel my passions. Has anyone been in my boat before? Is anyone in the above fields?

BTW: I know Petroleum Engineering could have me in either Cold Balls, Russia or paradise South America.


I went mechanical. I really looked hard at aerospace, but in the end I decided that the utility of having a mech. degree would be worth it. Right now I design electrical switchgear. I want tto start doing my own designs and prototype firearms.

Mechanical can really take you anywhere, but you may get there and suddenly find yourself asking how you got there.
Link Posted: 3/10/2010 5:32:19 AM EDT
Petroleum engineering is where the money is at. After 5-10 years in the biz you'll be making almost twice what most other engineers make.

the sweet part is petroleum engineers aren't number crunchers and it can take you where ever in the world you want to go.
Link Posted: 3/10/2010 5:34:41 AM EDT
<––––-Not an engineer

But most of the people I graduated college with are. It seems that the fields which have the best job opportunities involve electrical, mining, and civil engineering.
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