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Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:31:55 PM EST
Originally Posted By Infallible:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Originally Posted By F4Squid:
Originally Posted By Greggy_D:
For a minute, I thought you meant St Pete FLORIDA. I was like...how did a FW190 crash in FL?


mechanical difficulties on the way to Pearl Harbor.


And it was over when they got there, either


It was NEVER OVER when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor!!



LoL, Belushi in animal house?

Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:32:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/22/2009 6:32:47 PM EST by kevinb120]
Originally Posted By BulletBait:
Just goes to show Russia is B-I-G

Makes you wonder what else is over there.


There's tons of stuff hidden there. There is a blog where a girl explores around Kursk and finds stuff all the time, tanks, tunnels, bunkers, weapons, helmets and knives, you name it.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:32:34 PM EST
I can't believe the paint and markings were still visible. The elements in St. Petersberg are not kind.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:34:47 PM EST
That's cool, I hope they fix it up.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:35:43 PM EST

Hopefully a investment banker will buy it and spare no expense in restoring it. (I kid of course)

Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:36:23 PM EST
The mind boggles at all the military hardware still just sorta laying around the former soviet union. Tanks, guns, unexploded ordnance, dead armies, and now apparently aircraft as well. And they're just..sitting there! Right where they were left during the advance and retreat.

Cool find.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:38:23 PM EST
Here I am thinking this post was about finding an FW in Florida.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:43:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By KeepTheChange:
Here I am thinking this post was about finding an FW in Florida.



Dude. Really?
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:47:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By BulletBait:
Just goes to show Russia is B-I-G

Makes you wonder what else is over there.



There is tons of military materiel just below the surface in Russia, I've seen videos of guys going out with just a shovel and digging up all kinds of old weapons, helmets and MINES ! in historical battlefields. So many German and Russians were killed in those battles.

They just let them lay and let the elements take care of the dead.

Link Posted: 1/22/2009 6:56:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/22/2009 7:10:52 PM EST by NathanL]
It's an older video.

It was purchased and shipped to the US for restoration.

Here's the history of this aircraft. Also reported that in 1996 the original pilot of the aircraft saw her for the first time since the war.

http://www.preservedaxisaircraft.com/Luftwaffe/fockewulf/fw190.htm
Registration of preserved/restored WWII aircraft.

Fw 190A-5 0151227 USA CR N19027 DG+HO 4./JG54, White A Sold to Flying Heritage Collection, Seattle, Wahington state, USA. Under resoration with Gosshawk Unlimited to fly. Rec in Leningrad area 1990

Fw190 A5 White A of 4./JG54

This Focke-wulf 190 was manufactured in April 1943, originally as an A-5 variant and supplied with the full work number 0151227. It was the 415th A-5 constructed from batch 0150812 - 0151793 and manufactured by the parent factory of Focke-Wulf Flugzeugbau GmbH at Bremen.
Interestingly, W.Nr 1227, seems not to have been manufactured as a straight A5 variant. A standard A-5 was fitted with outer MG/FF 20mm cannons and was completed with the central wheel well covers. On W.Nr 1227, the outer MG/FF cannons had not been fitted on the production line, the central wheel well covers had also been removed and in its place a central ETC501 bomb rack had been fitted.
By April 1943 production Focke-wulf were still behind in the production of the F-2 variant. Focke-wulf therefore continued to factory modify A-5 variants to accommodate the slipping production schedule. Focke-wulf 190 A-5, W.Nr 1227 is seen generally as being originally manufactured as an A-5, but became a factory modified example and so making it a Fw190 A-5/U3.
If it had been constructed on its own production run, the completed W.Nr 1227 would have been known as a F-2 variant; a total of 271 F-2's and F-2/tp's were produced upto May 1943.
On reaching the end of its production run, W.Nr 1227 was painted with the individual Stammkennzeichen (RLM block codes) of DG+HO.

Movements
In 1942 the German High command had the idea of rotating units in the Eastern Front with those in the Western Front. With this idea, the original plan was to rotate the whole of JG54 in the East with JG26 in the West in early 1943. The first and only units to return were 4./JG54 of the II Gruppe and the whole of III/JG54 who returned to France in mid February. In return I/JG26 and 7./JG26 of the III/JG26 went to Russia where JG26 operated for a while under the command of JG54.
The 4./JG54 pilots and ground crew returned West to act as a nucleus to help build up the new IV/JG54, whilst pulling in resources from other units. Due to a shortage of Fw190's, the 10, 11 & 12 staffeln of the new IV Gruppe were worked up with new Bf109 G-3 and G-4. At the end of April the task for 4./JG54 was complete and with a build up of Russian forces around Leningrad, 4./JG54 were on their way back to the Northern Front to join the rest of the II Gruppe again.
W.Nr 1227 was flown via several bases from an aircraft pool and most probably delivered fresh to JG54 by a new squadron pilot. Around mid May she arrived at the former Russian airbase of Siwerskaja to join the ranks of other Fw190's being operated by I and II Gruppes of JG54.
Although the yellow theatre markings might have been painted prior to delivery to 4./JG54, the original camouflage was painted over. It was standard procedure to paint over the factory finished colours of RLM74 Gray Green and RLM75 Gray Violet which covered the top surface. The sides on this A5 which had a base of RLM02 gray with mottling of RLM74 and RLM75 going down to the RLM76 Light Blue to the underside. As these colours were unsuitable for the Leningrad area of the Russian Front, JG54 applied a unique three colour combination. JG54 were known to experiment with different colour combinations. The colour combination generally followed the original demarcation lines and consisted of a dark green, brown violet and tan (sand) which was more suited to the forests areas of Northern Russia. ('new' colours as listed in Ken Merricks book).
To this was applied yellow theatre bands to the underside of the wing tips, outside of the lower cross, to the lower quadrant of the rudder, around the fuselage cross and to the lower engine cowlings. The last area to be touch up was to the underside blue to hide the last two remaining letters of the factory codes (the others were under the yellow wing tips) and to apply the tactical letter of a 'White A'.
To say this marking was unusual would be correct. No surviving JG54 pilots can recall flying with letter markings, having always recorded numbers within the log books. During the summer of 1943, no horizontal band denoting the II Gruppe was added to aircraft of 4./JG54 either.
At the beginning of July 1943, 4./JG54 were back in operations. At the same time, IV/JG54 had moved to Jesau on there way to Northern Russia. When the new IV Gruppe reached Russia in the middle of July, the 4./JG54 were again subordinated to the new Gruppe. As the 10 staffel of the IV Gruppe carried white numbers, white letters seem to have been applied to the 4./JG54 who were acting as a semi autonomous ground attack unit.

The loss of Fw190 A5/U3 W.Nr 1227.
On Monday 19th July 1943 Fw190 A-5 W.Nr 1227 'White A' went on a mission carrying a SC250 (550Ib) bomb. Taking off from Siwerskaja, on what was probably a hot summer day, 'White A' headed for the Front line which was only fifteen or so minutes flight time away. Crossing the front line over the Dvina River, the Fw190, flying with another crossed it and headed East. Whilst behind enemy lines, in an area called Voibakala, the 'Rotte' attacked an armoured train and reportedly suffered damage from flak. The loss report indicates the Fw190 crash landed due to this damage, although none was located on the airframe. It Fw190 suffered a catastrophic failure of the BMW801, caused by a rag -sabotage is suspeced as it was a new engine was fitted a few days before). The Fw190 was recorded as being 100% lost in the map reference co-ordinates of Pl.Qu.20124. This grid system based on 1:200,000 maps was used to identify crash sites, possibly for salvage, recovery of missing pilots or as the best way of identifying an area consisting of unpronounceable Russian towns, villages and large areas of forests and lakes. The more numbers the Pl.Qu. reference gives, the smaller the area of the location. A key to this 'code', would help identify literally dozens of possible recoveries within Russia!!
The pilot Feldwebel Paul Rätz survived the crash landed behind enemy lines. He removed his leather flying helmet and retrieved the first air kit from the rear fuselage and is thought to have headed West back to the front line only a dozen or so miles from the crash site. He was undoubtedly captured by the Russians and interned although the Luftwaffe loss report still class him as 'Vermißt' (missing) in action.

Notes
The fourth Staffeln of Jagdgeschwader 54 'Grunherz' only seemed to have carried this unusual white letter combination for a few months through the summer and autumn of 1943. On returning to join the II Gruppe again, the staffel reverted to the number system again. There are only two other known 4/JG54 loses where Fw190's have been recorded as lost with these distinctive markings.

• On 8th July 1943 the relatively new Fw190 A-5, W.Nr 1520 'White D' was 100% crashed whilst taking off with the pilot killed.
• On 23rd August 1943 Fw190 A-4, W.Nr 5808 'White B' was classed as 100% lost when it crash landed due to flak damage at location Pl.Qu.18212. The pilot was injured but returned safely to his unit.

Found in silver birch forest 1989. Recovered 1991. Doug/David Arnold and now Paul Allen


Same Paul Allen of Microsoft fame.



List of the other remaining survivors from the war.

Wk. Nr. 5476, a Fw 190 A-2 from JG 5, owned by Wade S. Hayes and currently located in Texas USA. It is thought to be one of the oldest Fw 190s still in existence.
Wk. Nr. 2219, a Fw 190 A-3 from IV./JG 5, currently being rebuilt for the Norwegian Air Force Museum
Wk. Nr. 1227, a Fw 190 A-5 from IV/JG 54, currently being rebuilt in the UK for the Flying Heratige Collection out of Seattle, Washington USA.
Wk. Nr. 550214, a Fw 190 A-6 possibly flown by III./NJG 11 as it was fitted with a FuG 217 Neptun radar system. Formerly displayed in the UK but shipped to South Africa where it is now on display at the South African National Museum of Military History.
Wk. Nr. 550470, a Fw 190 A-6 from I./JG 26, Owned by Malcolm Lang and located in Lubbock Texas, USA.
Wk. Nr. 170393, a Fw 190 A-8 from 6./JG 1, mostly a replica built from original parts, located at the Luftfahrtmuseum, Hanover Germany.
Wk. Nr. 174056, a Fw 190 A-8 unknown history, owned by Malcolm Lang and located in Chandler Arizona USA where it is under restoration.
Wk. Nr. 173889, a Fw 190 A-8 from 7./JG 1, owned by Mark Timken, currently under restoration.
Wk. Nr. 350177, a Fw 190 A-8 from 12./JG 5, owned by Jon W. Houston and located at the Texas Air Museum in Rio Hondo, Texas, USA.
Wk. Nr. 730923, a Fw 190 A-8 as a NC 900, located in the Musee de L'Air in Paris France.
Wk. Nr. 732183, a Fw 190 A-8 from 12./JG 5 as flown by Rudi Linz, a German ace with 79 victories, this aircraft was shot down over Norway by a British Mustang, owned by John W. Houston and currently under restoration at the Texas Air Museum.
Wk. Nr. 733685, a Fw 190 A-8 that had formerly been part of a Mistel S-3B composite aircraft, located at the Imperial War Museum in London, England.
Wk. Nr. 210968, a Fw 190 D-9 from 2./JG 26, under restoration for the Luftwaffe Museum in Berlin, Germany.
Wk. Nr. 601088, a Fw 190 D-9 from IV (Sturm)./JG 3 "Udet" Geschwader, captured by the US intact and labeled FE-120 and used in testing following the war. Located at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, USA. The aircraft is on display in the Museum's Air Power gallery. It is on long term loan from the National Air and Space Museum.[64]
Wk. Nr. 836017, a Fw 190 D-13 from 1./JG 26 as flown by Oberstleutnant Heinz Lange. After capture labelled FE-117 and later donated to the Georgia Technical University, and then fell into disrepair. Later restored in Germany by William Flugzeuge and returned to the Champlain Figher Museum in Mesa, Arizona. This aircraft is believed to be airworthy.
Wk. Nr. 670071, a Fw 190 F-3 from 1./SchG 1. Under restoration for the Flugplatz Museum of Cottbus, Germany.
Wk. Nr. 5415, a Fw 190 F-8, thought to be under restoration in New Zealand.
Wk. Nr. 930838, a Fw 190 F-8, currently in storage at the Yugoslav Aeronautical Museum in Belgrade.
Wk. Nr. 931862, a Fw 190 F-8 from 9./JG 5, the "White 1" as flown by Unteroffizier Heinz Orlowski. Shot down by P-51's over Norway. Under restoration in Kissimmee, Florida, USA by The White 1 Foundation, and is expected to be returned to airworthy status.
Wk. Nr. 931884, a Fw 190 F-8 from I./SG 2, built by Arado as an A-4 with Wk. Nr. 640069, but later rebuilt by Fieseler as an F-8. Captured intact by the US and marked as FE-117. Flown for a number of years and later restored by NASM where it is now located.
Wk. Nr. 584219, a Fw 190 F-8/U1 converted into a 2 seat unit as a VIP transport for Jagdfliegerschule 103. Captured by the RAF in Norway and later flown for testing purposes. Currently located in the Bomber Command Hall at the RAF Museum in Hendon, England. It is the only known 2 seat Fw 190 in existence
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 7:28:21 PM EST
Originally Posted By OFFSHORE:
I can't believe the paint and markings were still visible. The elements in St. Petersberg are not kind.


They actually help preserve it when the object is protected under a layer of snow a good part of the year.

There's an early B-52 crash up in Maine that's in remarkable condition due to crashing in a young forest,the trees growing up and having significant snowfall.Some things are almost chilling like the ash piles from the magnesium hubs remaining and the placards being as plain to read as the day they were painted,It's a shame that so many people have defaced it by scribing their names into it and plenty of souveniers have walked out of there but people are people and therefore suck yet a remarkable percentage of the plane is still there.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 7:44:00 PM EST
60 years ago... those trees probably weren't there.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 7:50:46 PM EST

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
It'll certainly be pulled out and restored to museum quality if not actually restored to flyable condition.

I'm sure the finders are keeping its location a closely guarded secret until it's removed,
or pieces of it will disappear instantaneously.


CJ


It will not be back in the air. The airframe is too far gone. It does not take much corrosion to make it un-airworthy

Link Posted: 1/22/2009 7:52:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/22/2009 7:52:59 PM EST by NathanL]
Originally Posted By cjheap:
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
It'll certainly be pulled out and restored to museum quality if not actually restored to flyable condition.

I'm sure the finders are keeping its location a closely guarded secret until it's removed,
or pieces of it will disappear instantaneously.


CJ


It will not be back in the air. The airframe is too far gone. It does not take much corrosion to make it un-airworthy



Do people just skip to the end. The plane has FLOWN. It's currently owned by Paul Allen and it's at the museum in Seattle. At one time it was on the air show circuit.

When it was flying it had a set of replacement skins (along with tons of fuse stringer/formers replaced/repaired) now that it's in the museum it has had it's original skins replaced on it.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 7:59:02 PM EST
Originally Posted By outofbattery:
Originally Posted By OFFSHORE:
I can't believe the paint and markings were still visible. The elements in St. Petersberg are not kind.


They actually help preserve it when the object is protected under a layer of snow a good part of the year.

There's an early B-52 crash up in Maine that's in remarkable condition due to crashing in a young forest,the trees growing up and having significant snowfall.Some things are almost chilling like the ash piles from the magnesium hubs remaining and the placards being as plain to read as the day they were painted,It's a shame that so many people have defaced it by scribing their names into it and plenty of souveniers have walked out of there but people are people and therefore suck yet a remarkable percentage of the plane is still there.


It crashed into Elephant mountain which is right outside Greenville, ME. This is in the Moosehead lake region of Maine.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 8:08:03 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 8:20:09 PM EST
Originally Posted By NathanL:
Originally Posted By cjheap:
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
It'll certainly be pulled out and restored to museum quality if not actually restored to flyable condition.

I'm sure the finders are keeping its location a closely guarded secret until it's removed,
or pieces of it will disappear instantaneously.


CJ


It will not be back in the air. The airframe is too far gone. It does not take much corrosion to make it un-airworthy



Do people just skip to the end. The plane has FLOWN. It's currently owned by Paul Allen and it's at the museum in Seattle. At one time it was on the air show circuit.

When it was flying it had a set of replacement skins (along with tons of fuse stringer/formers replaced/repaired) now that it's in the museum it has had it's original skins replaced on it.


It was completely remanufactured then. They did not just slap new skins on it and go. Might as well be a kitplane.

Link Posted: 1/22/2009 8:24:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By UH_SALT_RIFLE:
Someone else found it first. Gauges are missing, it's been "Lootied". Wonder about the guns?


Someone needs to PS Lootie taking the instruments.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 9:17:40 PM EST


Here she is today.



More pics here: Paul Allen's Flying Heritage collection
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 9:30:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By SkyFive:
Hopefully a investment banker will buy it and spare no expense in restoring it. (I kid of course)




It's part of the Obama bail-out.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 10:28:47 PM EST
I remember reading in a warbirds magazine in the 90's about a 190 that was pulled up out of a lake near the Swiss border. The story was he pilot ditched it in the lake at the end of WW2 to evade capture. The plane was in amazing condition due to the cold water in the lake. The markings and paint scheme was in an immaculate state. I'm sure restoration wasn't too difficult.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 10:51:44 PM EST
In my more than 35 years in Alaska, I've come across my share of derelict, abandoned and crashed airframes in Alaska. I have to say that I'm stupified at the absolutely fantastic condition this FW190 is in after being in such a harsh environment since the mid 40s.

I've hiked to a B-29 crash site at Bomber Gap in the Talkeetnas that has very very little remaining of the aircraft due to heavy snows and underbrush growing around it. I've seen the wreck of a B-24 that has just scraps remaining. I've also examined the wreck of a tri-motor with nothing more remaining than the frame and powerplant. The Queen of Dago Lake, a PBY, was recently (within 10 years) airlifted intact back to Anchorage from Western Alaska and was in much worse shape.

The FW-190 is quite the find.
Link Posted: 1/22/2009 11:23:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/22/2009 11:24:41 PM EST by NathanL]
Video of another FW-190 found at the bottom of a lake in Norway 2-3 years ago.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nnc0C71vbtA

I wish they'd find a good stuka. Only 2 on display in the world and the one in the US (Chicago) is not correct. Another in England but it's a little far to go take pictures of. Spattering of pieces on display here and there as well.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 4:42:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/23/2009 4:46:58 AM EST by exdalamt]
Originally Posted By _DR:

Here she is today.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2gw6pfp.jpg

More pics here: Paul Allen's Flying Heritage collection



No, that's a different airframe; this is a "D" model with an inverted V-12 engine. The one in the OP video is an "A" model with a radial engine. I think the one pictured (the "D" model) used to be owned by the Champlin Fighter Museum in Mesa, AZ. Their collection was sold off several years back. BTW, the Champlin Museum used to have a fantastic collection of WWI and WWII machine guns.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 5:20:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/23/2009 5:28:02 AM EST by junker46]
CAUTION GRAPHIC



Not the only thing relic hunters are finding:
















Link Posted: 1/23/2009 5:24:58 AM EST
In other news protesters in Detroit immediately demanded the painting over of the Swastika on a historic WW2 German fighter found today. They said the Swastika reminded them that some 100 yrs before that, slavery was still alive and well in the United States.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 5:37:51 AM EST
It looked like some of the instrument gauges were missing and some of the glass covers were broken/cracked.

The plane survived the landing intact, so broken or cracked covers could be due to freezing.

Why are some missing?
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 5:44:22 AM EST
Originally Posted By junker46:
CAUTION GRAPHIC
Not the only thing relic hunters are finding:


Do you know the story of the mummified remains in the first two pictures?


Jane

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 5:57:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Originally Posted By junker46:
CAUTION GRAPHIC
Not the only thing relic hunters are finding:


Do you know the story of the mummified remains in the first two pictures?


Jane



I have seen those pics somewhere else and I don't believe they are that old. I seem to remember it was remains from a more modern air crash.

Pat
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:29:29 AM EST
Originally Posted By panzersergeant:
That is fucking awesome!
I wonder how the pilot managed to land in the middle of all those trees without tearing the plane up worse than it is. It looks very restorable.

ETA MIG-21, you are right; it was the ME109 that had the nose cannon.


Wonder what that "forrest" looked like 60 years ago.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:32:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By Greggy_D:
For a minute, I thought you meant St Pete FLORIDA. I was like...how did a FW190 crash in FL?


that's exactly what I thought too.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:33:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By cjheap:
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
It'll certainly be pulled out and restored to museum quality if not actually restored to flyable condition.

I'm sure the finders are keeping its location a closely guarded secret until it's removed,
or pieces of it will disappear instantaneously.


CJ


It will not be back in the air. The airframe is too far gone. It does not take much corrosion to make it un-airworthy



It's obvious that you know nothing about historic aircraft restoration.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:47:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By _DR:

Here she is today.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2gw6pfp.jpg

More pics here: Paul Allen's Flying Heritage collection


That is not the same plane.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:50:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By _DR:

Here she is today.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2gw6pfp.jpg

More pics here: Paul Allen's Flying Heritage collection


That is not the same plane.



He has 2 FW190s?

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:52:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/23/2009 6:52:42 AM EST by _DR]
Originally Posted By exdalamt:
Originally Posted By _DR:

Here she is today.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2gw6pfp.jpg

More pics here: Paul Allen's Flying Heritage collection



No, that's a different airframe; this is a "D" model with an inverted V-12 engine. The one in the OP video is an "A" model with a radial engine. I think the one pictured (the "D" model) used to be owned by the Champlin Fighter Museum in Mesa, AZ. Their collection was sold off several years back. BTW, the Champlin Museum used to have a fantastic collection of WWI and WWII machine guns.



Ah I stand corrected then. Thanks for setting that straight.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:53:21 AM EST
Originally Posted By hossack:
Wow-Let's hope it gets pulled out and restored. I assume there are other relics waiting to be discovered nearby.


in Russia, you can bet on it, that place just never ends.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:54:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By _DR:

Here she is today.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2gw6pfp.jpg

More pics here: Paul Allen's Flying Heritage collection



This -

DORA IS COMPLETED!

Air Classics, Aug 2004 by O'Leary, Michael
GossHawk finishes Doug Champlin's Fw 190D-13

"It was really a learning experience," said Dave Goss - president of GossHawk Unlimited at Falcon Field, Mesa, Arizona. He was referring to the absolutely magnificent Focke-Wulf Fw 190D-13 that he and his talented workers completed during April. Owned by noted collector Doug Champlin since 1971, this aircraft had been shipped to then-West Germany for restoration in the 1970s.

The captured aircraft (which wore the codes FE-118 and T2-118) had been evaluated in the United States before being given to the Georgia Institute of Technology where it was parked outside the school's flying club. After several years, the Fw 190 and a Bf 109G were sold to a local FAA inspector who stored them at various vacant lots in a poor section of Atlanta. The aircraft steadily went downhill until being discovered by aviation historian Jerry Crandall in the mid-1960s. He began a long battle to preserve these rare survivors.

During the 1970s, aircraft restoration was not up to our present exacting standards. While in Germany, much of the original brackets and mounts were stripped out and thrown away. Also, the majority of the work was not up to airworthiness standards. However, the aircraft did look quite nice when it was returned to Champlin's growing Fighter Museum. Registered N190D, the aircraft even had its mighty Jumo run up on the rare occasion.

"After Doug sold his museum to the Museum of Flight in Seattle, he made the complete commitment to restore the Dora back to absolutely first-class flying condition," said Goss. Of note, hardly any original blueprints or reference material survive on the D-13 - it was a last ditch fighter and much of the material was destroyed during the war. Doug and his team had to do a lot of reverse engineering, especially making the brackets and mounts on the inside of the fuselage and wing.

In a great gesture of cooperation, the USAF Museum exchanged the wing on the Fw 190D-9 they had on display at Wright-Patterson for the wing on Champlin's aircraft. When the military got rid of the aircraft, they simply sent off a "Focke-Wulf package" and the two wings were swapped. Thus, for the first time in decades, both aircraft now have their original wings.

"Doug wanted everything back to original," said Dave "and this included the guns, radios, and the early auto pilot that was installed in the plane. We searched all over the world for components and received some significant help from a variety of people."

Because of the war situation, the Fw 190D-13 employs wooden parts and to recreate these, wood was imported from Germany. Immediately after the photo was taken, the Dora was disassembled and shipped by truck to the Museum of Flight where it was on hand for the opening of the new Personal Courage Wing on 6 June. However, the aircraft is on loan to that institution but it is also up for sale and comes with an additional Jumo engine and parts of another. Interested parties should contact Bruce Redding at 702-371-1957.

The departure of Yellow 10 from GossHawk does not mean that the company is out of the Fw business - far from it. Doctor Mark Timken's Fw 190F-8 White 1 recently arrived at Falcon Field. "Mark wants this aircraft to be restored to flying condition with every bit of original gear in place," said Dave. "This will be a multi-year project but will result in a very, very original WWII fighter." White 1 has its own website selling a variety of Fw items, all of which goes to support the restoration. Check out www.white1foundation.org.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 6:59:09 AM EST
That's amazing. It just sat there for 60 years and nobody stumbled across it? Reminds me of that waterfall they discovered in California (i think) about two years ago.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 7:02:50 AM EST
If any of you guys want your own FW-190 (A or D variant), and have deep enough pockets, check out www.flugwerk.com . They sell fullsize replicas in kit form.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 7:05:28 AM EST
Black pathfinders! In Russia Groups of people search the forest looking for war goodies. Which is illegal because of the live ordinance. So they find Lugars and MG42's and sell them to the Mafia to be used as weapons. They also sell the "militaria" to collectors. They recently found a Tiger tank in the bottom of a swamp in perfect condition. Oh to get my hands on a PPSH 41 found at a stalingrad site!! ohhhh yeah!!!
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 7:07:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By _DR:

Here she is today.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2gw6pfp.jpg

More pics here: Paul Allen's Flying Heritage collection


That's Yellow 10 -

http://www.cebudanderson.com/yellow10.htm

“Yellow 10” (serial 836017) was delivered to Jagdgeschwader 26 in March 1945, within two months of VE-Day.

It was flown by Maj. Franz Goetz (63 victories), the last JG-26 commander, who retained the Pik As (ace of spades) emblem of his previous unit, JG-53.

Yellow 10 (Goetz’s “lucky number”) was one of five long-nose 190s taken to the U.S. for evaluation.

Of those, only three remain including two owned by the National Air and Space Museum.

Subsequently 836017 was donated to Georgia Tech, and after years of neglect it was acquired by David Kyte in California.

Doug Champlin learned of the derelict fighter and in 1972 purchased it for shipment to Germany.

There Art Williams of Guenzburg began a four-year restoration with assistance from Prof. Kurt Tank.

Many missing parts had to be found or manufactured but the project was largely completed in 1976 and returned to the U.S.

As the only privately-owned 190D, the “Dora” was the crown jewel of the Champlin collection in Mesa, Arizona.

In 2001 a complete rebuild was begun by Gosshawk Aviation, directed by Dave Goss at Falcon Field.

The result is perhaps the most authentic, airworthy Luftwaffe aircraft in North America.

Yellow 10 now resides in her new home at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 7:45:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By exdalamt:
I think Paul Allen of Microsoft now owns it; it was recovered several years ago, not a recent discovery.



Lucky bastard. The Butcherbird was one of my favorite airplanes when I was into model building. I sure wouldn't mind having the real thing.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 3:21:12 PM EST
I've always wanted to see a Fw190 with the BMW801 fly. I've read that it has a really unique sound.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 4:02:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By _DR:

Here she is today.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2gw6pfp.jpg

More pics here: Paul Allen's Flying Heritage collection



Fail...That's FW-190D-13...which has a very unique story in itself...the FW-190 is the vid is an "A" model which has a radial engine...a very different plane.


To the OP, thanks. A BIG FW buff here.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 4:23:49 PM EST
Originally Posted By paris-dakar:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Originally Posted By F4Squid:
Originally Posted By Greggy_D:
For a minute, I thought you meant St Pete FLORIDA. I was like...how did a FW190 crash in FL?


mechanical difficulties on the way to Pearl Harbor.


And it was over when they got there, either


I don't think the A5 was in service until late 1942.



It probably got lost over Macho Grande.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 4:29:49 PM EST
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Originally Posted By junker46:
CAUTION GRAPHIC
Not the only thing relic hunters are finding:


Do you know the story of the mummified remains in the first two pictures?


Jane





It looks like they are in a bog. Very good preservation properties in that sort of environment.
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 4:31:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Originally Posted By junker46:
CAUTION GRAPHIC
Not the only thing relic hunters are finding:


Do you know the story of the mummified remains in the first two pictures?


Jane





It looks like they are in a bog. Very good preservation properties in that sort of environment.


+1

There was a thread a while ago about a Stg III that was pulled out of a peat bog. Thing looked like new.

Link Posted: 1/23/2009 4:33:07 PM EST
Originally Posted By hondaciv:
Video Link

Wow. What a find!


Thanks for the link,
Link Posted: 1/23/2009 4:39:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Originally Posted By junker46:
CAUTION GRAPHIC
Not the only thing relic hunters are finding:

Do you know the story of the mummified remains in the first two pictures?

It looks like they are in a bog. Very good preservation properties in that sort of environment.

Yes, I've heard that. It appears they found the pilot; what about the plane? It oughta be around there somewhere, wouldn't you think?

Jane



Link Posted: 1/23/2009 4:43:49 PM EST
Canapy is forward
Was Pilot still in seat?
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