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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 10/6/2012 4:13:30 PM EST
Anyone own a youth bow for a child around 10 years old?

I went and looked at a few at pawn shops, and they were really heavy pulls.

Like in the 40 or 50 range.

I'm pretty sure my boy can't pull that.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:14:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2012 4:15:44 PM EST by Durka-Durka]
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:14:33 PM EST
Mathews, Bowtech, Bear and Hoyt all make youth bows.

I would go with Bowtech and Bear for the 10 year old models. They are more the early youth models.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:14:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By Durka-Durka:
Genesis bows would be perfect


This also
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:17:05 PM EST
Originally Posted By RabidMonkeyPox:
Originally Posted By Durka-Durka:
Genesis bows would be perfect


This also


Not sure if it will match your price range, though. But the things are great with growing kids.

Or you could do it right and get him a longbow :)
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:19:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By Durka-Durka:
Originally Posted By RabidMonkeyPox:
Originally Posted By Durka-Durka:
Genesis bows would be perfect


This also


Not sure if it will match your price range, though. But the things are great with growing kids.

Or you could do it right and get him a longbow :)


The problem is that he is 10, if it was young teens the major bow manufacturers have top quality bows designed around 20-40 pound draws and draw length. For the 10 year old's I do not see them physically pulling back a 20 pound draw. So I would go with the Genesis model.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:24:21 PM EST
Man, I've got a really old youth model Bear compound bow around here somewhere. It was given to me back when I was around 9ish-10ish by a retired game warden friend of the family. It needs a new sight and arrow knock and I still have a few short arrows that may fit. If I can dig it out from under whatever pile of stuff I have it under you are welcome to it. You want it?
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:25:41 PM EST
big +1 to OP getting his child into archery. A very good sport
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:26:46 PM EST


This, because you or the wife can use it also. I've even seen a lot of guys use them for bow fishing
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:28:17 PM EST
Our conservation club has a youth bow shooting session after the new years, and the most common bow they furnish is the Genesis. It should be just about perfect for a 10 year old.
My kids have been doing it 3 years now.

My 14yo daughter however, doesn't like the genesis bows anymore, and the few non-genesis bows are about the same size, so I guess I'll have to take her bow shopping to see what fits her, what she can pull, draw length, etc.

IIRC, The Genesis bows, even the packages, do no include sights or arrow rests.

If you have a archery shop somewhere in your area, check it out.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:30:12 PM EST

Originally Posted By Adamantium:
Man, I've got a really old youth model Bear compound bow around here somewhere. It was given to me back when I was around 9ish-10ish by a retired game warden friend of the family. It needs a new sight and arrow knock and I still have a few short arrows that may fit. If I can dig it out from under whatever pile of stuff I have it under you are welcome to it. You want it?

Sure man! I don't mind paying for it.


Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:30:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By RabidMonkeyPox:
big +1 to OP getting his child into archery. A very good sport

He actually won an archery contest at camp this summer, and so he has a knack for it apparently.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:31:50 PM EST
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:

Originally Posted By RabidMonkeyPox:
big +1 to OP getting his child into archery. A very good sport

He actually won an archery contest at camp this summer, and so he has a knack for it apparently.


That is awesome.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:33:39 PM EST
I had a Hoyt.
Link Posted: 10/6/2012 4:40:26 PM EST
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:

Originally Posted By RabidMonkeyPox:
big +1 to OP getting his child into archery. A very good sport

He actually won an archery contest at camp this summer, and so he has a knack for it apparently.


Cool Story: I remember not so long ago, they used to have archery contests at Dollywood. (It's like Six Flags, or a hillbilly Disney World). They actually had a few booths set up where you could fling arrows at a hay stack. They also had axe-throwing too. They replaced it with a resturant where a lady likes to dance with a chicken on her head.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:35:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By Durka-Durka:
Originally Posted By bcauz3y:

Originally Posted By RabidMonkeyPox:
big +1 to OP getting his child into archery. A very good sport

He actually won an archery contest at camp this summer, and so he has a knack for it apparently.


Cool Story: I remember not so long ago, they used to have archery contests at Dollywood. (It's like Six Flags, or a hillbilly Disney World). They actually had a few booths set up where you could fling arrows at a hay stack. They also had axe-throwing too. They replaced it with a resturant where a lady likes to dance with a chicken on her head.

Pussification of America...
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:47:48 AM EST

Originally Posted By cedjunior:
I had a Hoyt.

$$$$$$$
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:49:28 AM EST
Look at diamond bows if its his first. Can be had for a low price and made by bowtech. My wife shoots the razor edge i think they make a boys version
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:52:26 AM EST
Than he can upgrade to a bowtech assasin witch also comes as a R.A.K model that is alittle nicer and one of the best entrybows for the price
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 9:52:30 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/20/2012 9:52:44 AM EST by TinLeg]
Do you think he will want to hunt with it?


Some states have minimum draw weights allowable for hunting.



Texas used to be 45 pounds. Though I think that requirement has since been lowered or removed.



Also - drawing a compound bow used muscles differently than normal. I wouldn't be surprised if he can't draw a 30 lb bow, but is up to 40 pounds after a surprisingly short time.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 10:07:38 AM EST

Originally Posted By TinLeg:
Do you think he will want to hunt with it?


Some states have minimum draw weights allowable for hunting.



Texas used to be 45 pounds. Though I think that requirement has since been lowered or removed.



Also - drawing a compound bow used muscles differently than normal. I wouldn't be surprised if he can't draw a 30 lb bow, but is up to 40 pounds after a surprisingly short time.

He will most certainly want to hunt eventually. The bows I'm looking at now are adjustable between 15 and 25 lbs.

I don't think anything in that range is suitable for hunting, so I would expect that I have to buy him a larger bow before I take him hunting.


Link Posted: 11/20/2012 10:08:06 AM EST
I just bought my son a Mission Craze. 15-70lbs draw weight and 19-30" draw length. Most adjustment of any bow I have seen, and a smooth shooter. It will still work for him even when he is an adult.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 10:08:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By Srslidins14:
Look at diamond bows if its his first. Can be had for a low price and made by bowtech. My wife shoots the razor edge i think they make a boys version

I will check it out!
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 10:09:55 AM EST
FWIW - I have a Diamond Rock 2.0 and really like it.


It's not the "best" or "newest" bow out there, but it works and works well.
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