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Posted: 9/23/2005 10:11:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 4:36:21 AM EDT
[#1]
10 yrs really isnt a LONG-TERM hold in my opinion. I'd classify a long term hold as  holding it 25+ yrs, but thats just me.......GE's the only one thats weathered the years and remained strong. So, to answer your question buying 1 single stock planning a 10+ yr 'hold', I'd buy GE.Reinvesting dividends and steady growth
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 5:01:35 PM EDT
[#2]
Novastar  Financial, Inc.   (NYSE NFI)

This is a subprime mortgage lender. Current yield is >15%.  

Go to www.novastarmortgage.com - company's website.
Go to www.nfi-info.net for the stockholder's website that has information & history on the company.
Go to www.ncans.net for information on stock manipulation and illegal naked-shorting.

I own this stock in my Roth IRA, non-Roth brokerage account, and through the company's direct stock purchase plan.  I buy this stock when I have extra cash on hand which isn't often of course. I am up to almost 1000 shares.

The yahoo message board is active as well.


Do your own due diligence.
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 7:26:46 PM EDT
[#3]
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 10:41:27 AM EDT
[#4]
Berkshire Hathaway B Shares
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 12:37:05 PM EDT
[#5]
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 2:23:49 PM EDT
[#6]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Microsoft ain't going anywhere



You think MS will still be the major force in computer operationg systems in 10+ years? I'm not being a smartass but technology stocks freak me out.



I do think so. And I write software for a living.

But if tech stocks freak you out, don't do it. Your investments shouldn't make you lose sleep at night.
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 6:07:38 PM EDT
[#7]
Sirius Satellite

SIRI

I bought my first shares at $1.07

Wish I had kept them longer though
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 7:19:23 PM EDT
[#8]
I buy and hold 500 companies, specifically the S and P 500, VFINX.

BUT, if I were to buy single companies it would be these:
-GE
-Anheuser Busch
-General Dynamics
-Clorox
-Wrigley Chewing gum
-Johnson and Johnson
-Alcoa
-Schlumberger

These are all vanilla stocks where I fully understand their purpose of existence. They all pay dividends (some healthy) and they all have good track records. Stick with things you understand and stick with companies where you understand what they do. I am not a banker and so I don't invest in large banks I don't understand well. I also avoid companies like Tyco which make everything from ceramic pots to multimillion dollar equipment and semiconductors. GE is probably the most complicated of my picks.

I have individually owned all the companies listed above and would buy them again (but I own them all anyway via the S and P 500).
Link Posted: 9/26/2005 7:31:47 PM EDT
[#9]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Microsoft ain't going anywhere



You think MS will still be the major force in computer operationg systems in 10+ years? I'm not being a smartass but technology stocks freak me out.



depending upon your risk tolerance, you may prefer a mutual fund.  Spread your risk and avoid helping your stockbroker pay for his lake front property.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 11:08:51 PM EDT
[#10]
You could buy the Dogs of the Dow.  They would be major, Dow index stocks, which are not performing so well right now and therefore might be a good deal.

Or just buy Berkshire Hathaway like I said above....
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:24:07 AM EDT
[#11]
SAIC -- will go IPO in January.  The company is in the top 3 of DoD contractors, and should do well into the future.
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 9:12:30 PM EDT
[#12]
Link Posted: 10/5/2005 11:01:21 PM EDT
[#13]

Quoted:
SAIC -- will go IPO in January.  The company is in the top 3 of DoD contractors, and should do well into the future.



Wow, that will make many, many of their employees, very, very wealthy...wish they would have hired me when I applied a year ago
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:02:04 AM EDT
[#14]
Sirius,  buy and hold and don't listen to any commentator's comments.


Theres only 2 players and both should be successes.


MDP
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:13:29 AM EDT
[#15]

Quoted:
10 yrs really isnt a LONG-TERM hold in my opinion. I'd classify a long term hold as  holding it 25+ yrs, but thats just me.......GE's the only one thats weathered the years and remained strong. So, to answer your question buying 1 single stock planning a 10+ yr 'hold', I'd buy GE.Reinvesting dividends and steady growth



+1

add PG to that.
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 1:11:28 PM EDT
[#16]
For my .02, I'm going with the SAIC IPO that is forthcoming in January.  With their established network and current contracts with the DoD, this should surpass even the Google IPO!
Link Posted: 10/7/2005 1:26:49 PM EDT
[#17]

Quoted:
For my .02, I'm going with the SAIC IPO that is forthcoming in January.  With their established network and current contracts with the DoD, this should surpass even the Google IPO!



Come on?
Link Posted: 10/8/2005 7:08:47 PM EDT
[#18]
MO
Link Posted: 10/8/2005 9:05:04 PM EDT
[#19]
If there is a hot tip out there, I can assure you it ain't being posted on an internet forum. Anything you read here is long since past the mark.

If it IS on an internet forum, your grandmother and both your cousins bought in last year and are holding. Not to say Sirius and some of the others mentioned are not good stocks. But look at their long-term potential and their current premium.

My long term money is not for gambling. If you buy a single stock and hold it, and are betting on it to be a big winner long term, you might as well take the same money and put it all on the roulette table and let it ride.

Balance out a portfolio based on your needs through mutual funds and keep a small percentage of funds to play with for stocks like Sirius and others.

The only single stocks that are somewhat predictable for long-term holds are the old-school blue chips as mentioned before. And depending on where you are in your investment lifetime, quite frankly you are probably better off holding them in a collective group via mutual funds.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 5:27:34 AM EDT
[#20]
MMC
Marsh McClellan (sp?)
It dropped 50% earlier this year when the NYAG started investigating price fixing in NY earlier this year but I am darn sure it will pop back up. Risk managment will become much more popular in the future and MMC is one of the biggies in the field.
Link Posted: 10/11/2005 8:37:00 AM EDT
[#21]

Quoted:
If there is a hot tip out there, I can assure you it ain't being posted on an internet forum. Anything you read here is long since past the mark.

If it IS on an internet forum, your grandmother and both your cousins bought in last year and are holding. Not to say Sirius and some of the others mentioned are not good stocks. But look at their long-term potential and their current premium.

My long term money is not for gambling. If you buy a single stock and hold it, and are betting on it to be a big winner long term, you might as well take the same money and put it all on the roulette table and let it ride.

Balance out a portfolio based on your needs through mutual funds and keep a small percentage of funds to play with for stocks like Sirius and others.

The only single stocks that are somewhat predictable for long-term holds are the old-school blue chips as mentioned before. And depending on where you are in your investment lifetime, quite frankly you are probably better off holding them in a collective group via mutual funds.



This is some of the best advice on here.  
Why would you want to buy a stock and hold it 10 years?  If you are going to buy something for 10 years, why don't you buy a bond?  Much safer, and you know how much you are going to get.

I swear, some people buy stocks like they were tattoos.  They get them and then hold on to them forever.  You think the fund managers and brokerage houses on wall street buy and hold for 10 years?  No way.  They buy when they are down, and sell when they are up.  This is how you make money.  

Do your research.  Find a company and research it.  You have the internet, use it.  Lots of info on here.  Find a company that looks like it has a superior product.  Check it out.  Check out its competitors.  Read the reports.  I know, they are boring.  Watch the stock.  Watch the competitors stock.  Check out what the analyst say about the company.  When you see an  opening at a low point buy some.  At this point, set yourself a sell point.  If the stock goes down past this point.  Sell.  This takes dicipline.  It keeps you from losing your shirt.  Everyone always thinks their stock is going to go back up.  Now, if your stock does go up.  Move your sell point up too.  I like 15%.  Some people use 20%.  It is up to you.  Remember you can always buy a stock again.  

You got questions.  Ask.
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