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1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 7/28/2002 10:36:14 AM EST
I found these on the net, not sure if they are true or not, but still interesting. 1. The first German serviceman killed in the war was killed by the Japanese (China, 1937), the first American serviceman killed was killed by the Russians (Finland 1940), the highest ranking American killed was Lt. Gen. Lesley McNair, killed by the US Army Air Corps. So much for allies. 2. The youngest US serviceman was 12 year old Calvin Graham, USN. He was wounded and given a Dishonorable Discharge for lying about his age. (His benefits were later restored by act of Congress) 3. At the time of Pearl Harbor the top US Navy command was Called CINCUS (pronounced "sink us"), the shoulder patch of the US Army's 45th. Infantry division was the Swastika, and Hitler's private train was named "Amerika". All three were soon changed for PR purposes. 4. More US servicemen died in the Air Corps than the Marine Corps. While completing the required 30 missions your chance of being killed was 71%. 5. Generally speaking there was no such thing as an average fighter pilot. You were either an ace or a target. For instance Japanese ace Hiroyoshi Nishizawa shot down over 80 planes. He died while a passenger on a cargo plane. 6. It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th round with a tracer round to aid in aiming. This was a mistake. Tracers had different ballistics so (at long range) if your tracers were hitting the target 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet tracers instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. This was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down. YOU'VE GOT TO LOVE THIS ONE... 7. When allied armies reached the Rhine the first thing men did was pee in it. This was pretty universal from the lowest private to Winston Churchill (who made a big show of it) and Gen. Patton (who had himself photographed in the act). 8. German Me-264 bombers were capable of bombing New York City but it wasn't worth the effort. 9. German submarine U-120 was sunk by a malfunctioning toilet. 10. Among the first "Germans" captured at Normandy were several Koreans. They had been forced to fight for the Japanese Army until they were captured by the Russians and forced to fight for the Russian Army until they were captured by the Germans and forced to fight for the German Army until they were captured by the US Army. AND I SAVED THE BEST FOR LAST... 11. Following a massive naval bombardment 35, 000 US and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska. 21 troops were killed in the firefight. It would have been worse if there had been any Japanese on the island.
Link Posted: 7/28/2002 10:46:52 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/28/2002 10:48:12 AM EST by Crookshanks]
Blunders doesn't seem to apply to most of your examples. They're more like anecdotes. To me, Hitler ordering his armies to veer-off on their drive to Moscow, and attack the breadbasket of Russia, was a huge blunder.
Link Posted: 7/28/2002 11:18:58 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/28/2002 11:50:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/28/2002 11:53:30 AM EST by Aimless]
Link Posted: 7/28/2002 12:16:29 PM EST
I always thought that the US refusal of "funnies" for D-Day was a rather obtuse move.
Link Posted: 7/28/2002 12:32:47 PM EST
The worst blunder I know of was during the invasion of Sicily. They did it at night, and the destroyers and cruisers offshore shot down a lot of our own C-47's fully loaded with paratroopers. They thought they were enemy bombers.
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 1:06:14 AM EST
i think there is something about a german plane that got lost and bombed a british city, thus sparking massive retaliation via the bombing of german cities. all because they got lost. btw, my grandfather survived 52 missions as a bombardier in the pacific-how bout those odds!
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 8:23:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By Crookshanks: Blunders doesn't seem to apply to most of your examples. They're more like anecdotes. To me, Hitler ordering his armies to veer-off on their drive to Moscow, and attack the breadbasket of Russia, was a huge blunder.
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That and the fact that he ignored history and did the same mistake Napolean did by starting the Russian campaign too late in the season.
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 8:47:08 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/29/2002 8:49:53 AM EST by SuperChicken]
Link Posted: 7/29/2002 8:48:20 AM EST
Originally Posted By Atencio:
Originally Posted By Crookshanks: Blunders doesn't seem to apply to most of your examples. They're more like anecdotes. To me, Hitler ordering his armies to veer-off on their drive to Moscow, and attack the breadbasket of Russia, was a huge blunder.
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That and the fact that he ignored history and did the same mistake Napolean did by starting the Russian campaign too late in the season.
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I'm about 3 chapters into STALINGRAD, by Antony Beevor. IT's great so far. Heavy rains that spring was a big factor, they started, IIRC, June 23 or so, 0315, Three MILLION fifty five thousand Germans.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:48:34 PM EST
Thats a great list I love stuff like that. Atencio,Crookshanks and Citidel, If you guys research further I believe you'll find that the Germans really had no longrange strategic plan,no systematic plan for defeating the Soviets. Obviously they started several months later than planned(distractions in Yugoslavia,ect),but beyond blowing the door open and destroying massive amounts of equipment and capturing staggering #'s of prisoners ,the Russians did not yeild quickly.The Nazi's underestimated the the Russians ability to trade space for time,their ability to stay in the war after the disaturous beginning,and obviously the amount of men and material the Red Army possessed(reguardless of how ineptly led). When the first faze of the invasion had been completed,and the Russians were still fighting,it became apparent that there hadn't been a meeting of the minds between the German General staff and corporal Hitler.There was no set plan to knock out the Soviet Union,just the "kick in the door and the whole rotten structure will cave in "plan.From there on out Hitler took charge of things and ......well you know the results(thank god!) An interesting read you might want to check out is"Hitlers Panzers East",by R.H.S. Stolfi. Gives some good insights into Hitlers mind set about war,his relationships with the General staff(talk about disfunctional)and the true strenth,logistics capabilities.ect of the wermacht. Its normaly assumed that the German army was some sorta juggernaut,but much of it was show.After reading some on the subject you find that yeah it was inovative,but designed for short term west European war.The minute they attacked Russia they were over there heads.Thats not to say they couldn't have beaten the Soviet Union,but they had to make all the right moves(as seen early in the conflict) and no mistakes.Once Hitler gave the order to turn away from Moscow it was over.They were already logistically stretched beyond the limit.After that, time and again corporal Hitler helped the allied cause. Anyhow sorry for the long post.Love this stuff,Check out the book fellas.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 7:53:03 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 8:07:37 PM EST
Yeah,those worked real well didn't they?Just crawling up the beach with nothing but rifles. Wonder why they didn't mount some artillery on those landing craft? You imagine the door on your boat dropping open to machine gun fire?
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 8:11:24 PM EST
How bout the whole concept of precision daylight bombing? Sending your bomber force hundreds of miles into enemy territory in broad daylight,unescorted,with only the guns carried aboard and on the plane next door to protect you.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 8:17:17 PM EST
Those are all tactical blunders. Supporting the likes of STALIN? WTF. The biggest mother of all strategic blunders.
Link Posted: 7/30/2002 11:35:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By Fireboss: Those are all tactical blunders.
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Yeah, you are right. Hitler (thank god) was a blunder-matic on the highest setting. Wouldn't listen to anyone, made enormous errors. Going after the oilfields of the Caucasus and Caspian instead of Moscow, anticipating the invasion at Pas-De-Calais instead of Normandy, and then believing Normandy was a feint for the main attack at Pas-De Calais I think was his biggest blunder.
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