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1/16/2020 9:48:49 PM
Posted: 1/17/2015 12:00:17 AM EST
Howdy all,

Outside of a college class in woodworking, all of my experience is self-taught, so go easy here.

I'm planning on building a new dining table. I am going for the distressed wood/rustic look. Here's my question. I'm a tall guy and I dislike the skirts on normal tables because my knees usually hit them depending on the height of the chair.

I'd like to join the legs to the top without the use of a skirt. What options do I have to make them solid other than a mortise/tenon joint?

I'd like to not drill through the top and connect w/ a bolt, but I don't really have any other ideas given my limited knowledge/experience. Thoughts?
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 4:47:34 AM EST
Pedestal base


from rockler

Scroll down and you'll see matching legs.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 5:28:11 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Covertness:
Pedestal base


from rockler

Scroll down and you'll see matching legs.
View Quote

Or trestle base.

Link Posted: 1/17/2015 9:10:41 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By midmo:

Or trestle base.

http://www.michaelhoywoodworking.com/resources/trestle.jpg
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Originally Posted By midmo:
Originally Posted By Covertness:
Pedestal base


from rockler

Scroll down and you'll see matching legs.

Or trestle base.

http://www.michaelhoywoodworking.com/resources/trestle.jpg



I built the treble table using adapted New Yankee Workshop plans about 10 years ago. It's rustic and very heavy. (8/4 oak)
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 11:35:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/18/2015 12:03:05 PM EST by JQ66]
Here's a trestle table article with some drawings

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/shaker-trestle-table-save-money-wood


And then there are Hay Rake tables. You might have to pay or subscribe for more details. They sell dvds of most of these, or you could get the back issue of FWW
http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/57002/build-a-hayrake-table

And another variation of a hay rake table
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/the-barnsley-hay-rake-table


You could use a sliding dovetail under the top. You could cut it with a router and a straightedge guide. Use a straight bit first then a dovetail. I have seen examples where the dovetail groove extends all the way to the edges, or you could have a stopped groove. Be sure to make the groove longer than the dovetail "pin" or rail on the base, to allow for seasonal wood movement.
If you do choose to use bolts from underneath, like on the trestle arm, make the hole for the bolt in the arm elongated, and don't torque the crew down hard. This will also allow for seasonal wood expansion or movement on you table top.

Like this
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/projects/magobeis-dining-table-part-1
Link Posted: 1/18/2015 8:13:48 PM EST
Check out this website, I think it's relevant to your question. He uses a Kreg jig to join the tabletop.

http://www.diypete.com/how-to-build-a-farmhouse-table/
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 11:57:58 PM EST
Hairpin table legs.
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 12:01:57 AM EST
I appreciate all the responses. There are some good options. I'm going to read though the links provided and see what might work best for my top.

I'm planning on getting a kreg jig and joining 2x8s like in the link above.
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