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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/22/2005 11:54:39 AM EDT
Judge OKs halfway house deal for woman originally sentenced to life for role in cop killing

Monday August 22, 2005
By JON SARCHE
Associated Press Writer
DENVER (AP) A woman who was sentenced to life without parole for her role in a burglary in which an officer was killed will get to leave prison for a halfway house under a plea bargain approved by a judge Monday.

The Colorado Supreme Court ruled in March that faulty jury instructions invalidated Lisl Auman's conviction on charges of felony murder and burglary in the 1997 death of Denver officer Bruce VanderJagt.

She pleaded guilty to burglary and accessory charges in exchange for a lighter sentence.

On Monday, a judge sentenced Auman, 29, to a 20-year sentence in community corrections, a phrase that in Colorado covers such as things as house arrest and halfway houses. She will get credit for the eight years she has served in prison.

The shooting happened after Auman recruited Mattheus Jaehnig to help her break into a former boyfriend's house to retrieve belongings. Officers chased the two to a condominium complex, where Jaehnig killed VanderJagt and then killed himself.

Under Colorado law, anybody involved in certain felonies is guilty of murder if someone is killed during the crime or during the flight from it. Auman's case caught the public's attention after celebrities including Hunter S. Thompson and Warren Zevon rallied for her freedom. They and other supporters questioned the fairness of that felony murder law, which has withstood challenges in Colorado and other states.

Auman will have to spend at least six months at a halfway house before she can try to earn the right to live on her own by regularly reporting to counselors and authorities, officials said. Her sentence could be reduced based on her performance in the rehabilitation program, city officials said.

Auman expressed gratitude to the officer's widow, Anna VanderJagt, saying that without her support she probably wouldn't have gotten out of jail. She also acknowledged she played a role in the shooting and caused pain for his family.

``I never, ever intended for anyone to be hurt or killed, but regretfully that's what happened,'' Auman said. ``I will shoulder this burden for the rest of my life.''

VanderJagt said in a July 29 letter to the Community Corrections board she supported the proposed sentence because it appeared Auman was taking responsibility for her husband's death.

``I believe acceptance is a large part of healing and I'm determined to heal and move forward,'' she told the judge Monday.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 11:56:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AR15fan:
Judge OKs halfway house deal for woman originally sentenced to life for role in cop killing

Monday August 22, 2005
By JON SARCHE
Associated Press Writer
DENVER (AP) A woman who was sentenced to life without parole for her role in a burglary in which an officer was killed will get to leave prison for a halfway house under a plea bargain approved by a judge Monday.

The Colorado Supreme Court ruled in March that faulty jury instructions invalidated Lisl Auman's conviction on charges of felony murder and burglary in the 1997 death of Denver officer Bruce VanderJagt.

She pleaded guilty to burglary and accessory charges in exchange for a lighter sentence.

On Monday, a judge sentenced Auman, 29, to a 20-year sentence in community corrections, a phrase that in Colorado covers such as things as house arrest and halfway houses. She will get credit for the eight years she has served in prison.

The shooting happened after Auman recruited Mattheus Jaehnig to help her break into a former boyfriend's house to retrieve belongings. Officers chased the two to a condominium complex, where Jaehnig killed VanderJagt and then killed himself.

Under Colorado law, anybody involved in certain felonies is guilty of murder if someone is killed during the crime or during the flight from it. Auman's case caught the public's attention after celebrities including Hunter S. Thompson and Warren Zevon rallied for her freedom. They and other supporters questioned the fairness of that felony murder law, which has withstood challenges in Colorado and other states.

Auman will have to spend at least six months at a halfway house before she can try to earn the right to live on her own by regularly reporting to counselors and authorities, officials said. Her sentence could be reduced based on her performance in the rehabilitation program, city officials said.

Auman expressed gratitude to the officer's widow, Anna VanderJagt, saying that without her support she probably wouldn't have gotten out of jail. She also acknowledged she played a role in the shooting and caused pain for his family.

``I never, ever intended for anyone to be hurt or killed, but regretfully that's what happened,'' Auman said. ``I will shoulder this burden for the rest of my life.''

VanderJagt said in a July 29 letter to the Community Corrections board she supported the proposed sentence because it appeared Auman was taking responsibility for her husband's death.

``I believe acceptance is a large part of healing and I'm determined to heal and move forward,'' she told the judge Monday.

Oxygen deprivation. That's the only thing I can think of to rationally explain this.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 12:00:51 PM EDT
Ahhh Hunter Thompson felt sorry for the slug!
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 12:02:53 PM EDT
She should have received the death penlty.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 12:10:33 PM EDT
Totally disagree, she was already in handcuffs when the officer was shot. Her mistake was following her lawyer's advice and not accepting a plea deal.

She had already served a number of years in prison when her conviction was overturned.
Link Posted: 8/22/2005 12:44:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SS109:
Totally disagree, she was already in handcuffs when the officer was shot. .


It was her caper, she was the mastermind. she recruited the others to do the crime, making her responsible for whatever they do during that crime.
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