Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 6/14/2009 2:18:27 PM EST
Why do they have that bump in the bottom of a wine bottle?

Link Posted: 6/14/2009 2:25:00 PM EST
It makes it look like more wine / bigger bottle.
Link Posted: 6/14/2009 2:28:16 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/14/2009 2:28:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By Merrell:
Why do they have that bump in the bottom of a wine bottle?


It is called a punt...the reasons for it being there have been disputed. Wikipedia has this to say:
A punt, also known as a kick-up, refers to the dimple at the bottom of a wine bottle. There is no consensus explanation for its purpose. The more commonly cited explanations include:[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_bottle#cite_note-Johnson000-0][1][/url]

  • it is a historical remnant from the era when wine bottles were free blown using a blowpipe and pontil. This technique leaves a punt mark on the base of the bottle; by indenting the point where the pontil is attached, this scar would not scratch the table or make the bottle unstable.
  • it had the function of making the bottle less likely to topple over –– a bottle designed with a flat bottom only needs a small imperfection to make it unstable –– the dimple historically allowed for a larger margin of error
  • it consolidates sediment deposits in a thick ring at the bottom of the bottle, preventing it from being poured into the glass;[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_bottle#cite_note-5][6][/url]
  • it increases the strength of the bottle, allowing it to hold the high pressure of sparkling wine/champagne
  • it holds the bottles in place on pegs of a conveyor belt as they go through the filling process in manufacturing plants
  • it accommodates the pourer's thumb for stability and ease of pouring
  • According to legend the punt was used by servants. They often knew more than their master about what was happening in town, and with a thumb up the punt they could show their master whether a guest was reliable or not. (Vinavisen 19 may 2008 - danish)
  • it provides a grip for riddling a bottle of sparkling wine manually in the traditional champagne production process.
  • it simply takes up some of the volume of the bottle, giving the impression that you're getting more wine for your money than is actually the case
  • Taverns had a steel pin set vertically in the bar. The empty bottle would be thrust bottom-end down onto this pin, puncturing a hole in the top of the punt, guaranteeing the bottle could not be refilled [folklore].
  • The punt acts as a lens, refracting the light to make the color of the wine more appealing.
  • Prevents the bottle from resonating as easily, decreasing the likelihood of shattering during transportation.
  • Allows bottles to be more easily stacked end to end. [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wine_bottle#cite_note-6][7][/url]

Link Posted: 6/14/2009 2:29:55 PM EST
It's to let the sediment settle on the bottom.

The shape of the top of the bottle, with the top having a bit of a bulge, is there for the same reason - to stop sediment from going into your glass.
Link Posted: 6/14/2009 2:31:00 PM EST
Debate all you want, it is for pressure resistance. Period.

Glass has poor tensile strength in bending, the inward dome places the glass in compression, where it has great resistance. The rest of the bottle is simply loaded in tensile stress.
Link Posted: 6/14/2009 2:34:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Debate all you want, it is for pressure resistance. Period.

Glass has poor tensile strength in bending, the inward dome places the glass in compression, where it has great resistance. The rest of the bottle is simply loaded in tensile stress.

Great for champagne bottles. But a regular wine bottle is not a pressure vessel.
Link Posted: 6/14/2009 2:36:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Debate all you want, it is for pressure resistance. Period.

Glass has poor tensile strength in bending, the inward dome places the glass in compression, where it has great resistance. The rest of the bottle is simply loaded in tensile stress.


Yes. It's called a kick, and makes the bottle stronger and resistant to breakage
Top Top