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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/1/2005 11:42:47 AM EDT
I see people looking for those who know 3D rendering, using Lightwave, Maya, 3D studio, etc.

Any of you here familiar with these programs? Which do you think is best?


And of course, see question in title.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 11:43:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 11:44:13 AM EDT by DzlBenz]
There are endless job possibilities for this field. Are you fluent in Hindi or Urdu? Maybe Tagalog?
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 11:44:34 AM EDT

Will computer graphics/animation be a hot field?


Yeah, in 1995.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 11:49:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By macman37:

Will computer graphics/animation be a hot field?


Yeah, in 1995.




Are you kidding? In 1995, computer graphics was like Donkey Kong and Mario Bros. Software and hardware continues to get more advanced and sophisticated. The level of realism achieved these days is incredible, and there is still more to go.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 11:51:23 AM EDT
I've used both Maya and 3DS Max. I kind of like 3DS better, but then again, I dont work in the industry; I just do it as a hobby.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 11:53:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Beefypeanut:
I've used both Maya and 3DS Max. I kind of like 3DS better, but then again, I dont work in the industry; I just do it as a hobby.



3DS Viz or Max?
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:01:39 PM EDT
yes, it will be a hot field for a .30/hour asian/indian to do.

Look for something else.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:05:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By whitelight:

Originally Posted By macman37:

Will computer graphics/animation be a hot field?


Yeah, in 1995.




Are you kidding? In 1995, computer graphics was like Donkey Kong and Mario Bros. Software and hardware continues to get more advanced and sophisticated. The level of realism achieved these days is incredible, and there is still more to go.



No, thos programs or ones like them were around in 95. All I meant was that you didn't get in on the ground floor when the getting was good. The other guys are right... it's all going to be outsourced unless you work for Pixar, Dreamworks or ILM.

(It's not THAT dire... There are lots of smaller boutique type places around... but if you were asking whether there's a lot of security in it? I don't personally think so... I think retouching is where it's at: That way if you get good with that there are still opportunities in the movie field. Now they're using Photoshop to do digital matte paintings.)
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:11:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:15:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:19:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Troy:
RE: outsourcing

The 3D animation field is more resistant to outsourcing than most, primarily due to the need for constant communication both within the 3D team and with the clients. The timelines are so short and changes in direction are so frequent that it is difficult to rely on a team halfway around the world. I'm not saying that that won't change, but there hasn't been a huge loss in the field yet, unlike most of the rest of the computer world.

-Troy



I stand corrected from my 2nd post.

----

I read "Cinefex" magazine whenever I get my hands on it and what Troy posted in his first post is dead on for what I've read there when a project is underway.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:24:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By whitelight:

Originally Posted By Beefypeanut:
I've used both Maya and 3DS Max. I kind of like 3DS better, but then again, I dont work in the industry; I just do it as a hobby.



3DS Viz or Max?



Max. good luck with this.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:28:50 PM EDT
Also there are trials of 3DStudio and Maya out there,

maybe plug away at one for a while.

I got to be pretty good with it, but we have a shared license and its a pain to export/import the license just to tinker.

MAde a tank though.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 12:46:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 12:48:01 PM EDT by 37Victor]
It's a darn good field, with companies all over the place, so no need to stay in Cali. For example, I work for a small studio in Utah. NWManitou from this site works for another such company in the intermountain west. ReelFX in Dallas is a great studio.

Pay is pretty good, around here you'll start out at most places at around $40,000. The field is more resilient than some of you think. Our studio, for example, goes up and down on Hollywood contracts (always expect to be screwed by them), but industry pays very well for commercial work. It's plentiful and when the economy goes south they just want more of it! If you're a small studio you really have no trouble meeting payroll just with small, quick, local jobs.

Additionally, freelance work pays very well. Only negative is it's less consistent, but some of my coworkers made much more working freelance than they do now (they got married and wanted the benefits and stability of a company).

You really don't need to go to school to do this. If you're a genius and can figure out Maya on your own, you're in. My officemate here, for example, never did, and he's a freakishly talented guy. Getting a job here is all about your demo reel and, often, prior work experience. No one's too impressed by what school you went to... but, like anything else, that university training is invaluable in helping you get good demo reel work. The math side is much overrated, you need some basic programming skills, but I think I personally overtrained in that regard- I almost never use those skills. They have specialists for that stuff.

They're right though in that you'll end up getting specialized quick. Unless, of course you work for a small studio- I have a friend at ILM who does lighting for hair. That's it- just sets up lighting for any hair in a shot. I, on the other hand, only get to work on romantic comedies and other light FX films, but I get whole sequences to myself. You decide which way you want to go. Small studios want generalists who can handle anything and you'll get a lot of work on small movies. Big studios want experts who are the absolute best at one specific thing and that's all you'll ever do, but you get to work on the biggest films.

In short, I guess, it's definitely worth it. It's a fun field, whether you end up in video games (which are booming), or VFX. If you've got the interest, patience, and talent, go for it!

ETA: Oh, and make sure you learn one of the top tier packages. I recommend Maya. It's impressive and you can always go back down. http://www.alias.com has a free trial version.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 1:11:27 PM EDT
Yeah, it's a great field to be in. There is a direct relationship between ability and job security which makes it difficult to outsource. If you are good, no matter what happens to your company, there will always be someone to hire you. There is always room for talent. Lots of the big holywood producers and studios are looking to other states to get their work done. It's a lot cheaper to pay somone in Utah than to pay someone in LA to do the same job. For instance, that "little" company I work for in the intermountain west is now owned by a particular mouse and heads up their new game division. Better watch it 37Victor, I just may have to send Jimminey "kneecaps" the Cricket over to your place for a nice midnight chat.

But anyways, it's a great field to work in. I too would recomend that you learn Maya or even XSI. Then pick a particular aspect of it and learn it really well. Become excellent at one thing and good at the rest. Put together a slick demo reel and off you go. I know that at least Maya has a personal learning edition of their software for download. The net is rife with tutorials.

check out

www.highend3d.com
www.cg-char.com
www.cgchannel.com

IM if you want more resources
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 1:12:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 37Victor:
It's a darn good field, with companies all over the place, so no need to stay in Cali. For example, I work for a small studio in Utah. NWManitou from this site works for another such company in the intermountain west. ReelFX in Dallas is a great studio.

Pay is pretty good, around here you'll start out at most places at around $40,000. The field is more resilient than some of you think. Our studio, for example, goes up and down on Hollywood contracts (always expect to be screwed by them), but industry pays very well for commercial work. It's plentiful and when the economy goes south they just want more of it! If you're a small studio you really have no trouble meeting payroll just with small, quick, local jobs.

Additionally, freelance work pays very well. Only negative is it's less consistent, but some of my coworkers made much more working freelance than they do now (they got married and wanted the benefits and stability of a company).

You really don't need to go to school to do this. If you're a genius and can figure out Maya on your own, you're in. My officemate here, for example, never did, and he's a freakishly talented guy. Getting a job here is all about your demo reel and, often, prior work experience. No one's too impressed by what school you went to... but, like anything else, that university training is invaluable in helping you get good demo reel work. The math side is much overrated, you need some basic programming skills, but I think I personally overtrained in that regard- I almost never use those skills. They have specialists for that stuff.

They're right though in that you'll end up getting specialized quick. Unless, of course you work for a small studio- I have a friend at ILM who does lighting for hair. That's it- just sets up lighting for any hair in a shot. I, on the other hand, only get to work on romantic comedies and other light FX films, but I get whole sequences to myself. You decide which way you want to go. Small studios want generalists who can handle anything and you'll get a lot of work on small movies. Big studios want experts who are the absolute best at one specific thing and that's all you'll ever do, but you get to work on the biggest films.

In short, I guess, it's definitely worth it. It's a fun field, whether you end up in video games (which are booming), or VFX. If you've got the interest, patience, and talent, go for it!

ETA: Oh, and make sure you learn one of the top tier packages. I recommend Maya. It's impressive and you can always go back down. http://www.alias.com has a free trial version.




Wow, thanks a lot. Your post was a ton of help.

Thanks to all who responded, too.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 1:17:53 PM EDT
Haha, here I am trying to avoid saying even what state you work in and you go and post that! You know, working for those guys, that they monitor everything you type right? Now that they know what sites you hang out at during work they've probably got enforcers wearing doofy hats with big round ears headed to your desk with the Happiest Nightsticks on Earth.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 1:23:13 PM EDT
Well, HR does know me as the "Man with the Knife." Problem is that I don't know just how much of a sense of humor the mouse has. I'm sure the IT guy has better stuff to do than monitor my surfing habits.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 1:24:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 1:24:20 PM EDT by nwmanitou]
Hey victor... um.. just out of curiosity, you have any room over there? No reason really, just wondering.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 1:33:48 PM EDT
You know, I just thought of another nice part of this job: You get to sit around for hours on end doing nothing but surf the net while waiting for renders, like NWManitou and I are clearly doing!
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 1:42:02 PM EDT
As computer graphics programs become more intuitive, jobs in the field will become harder to come by.

In short, think about what digital media did to photography studios, commercial airbrush artists, and small design firms in the past ten years...some prospered, most died out.

People want instant gratification, and online customization...ten years from now, my mother will be able to use the best animation software & creat awesome webpages.



My advice, become a doctor. (an opthamalogist...$1500 per eye for laser surgery sounds like a good career)
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:11:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mfingar:
As computer graphics programs become more intuitive, jobs in the field will become harder to come by.

In short, think about what digital media did to photography studios, commercial airbrush artists, and small design firms in the past ten years...some prospered, most died out.

People want instant gratification, and online customization...ten years from now, my mother will be able to use the best animation software & creat awesome webpages.



My advice, become a doctor. (an opthamalogist...$1500 per eye for laser surgery sounds like a good career)



Good advice.

Just like what has happen in video editing. Things/effects/quality that it took a couple hundred thousand dollars in equipment and years of training to do in video just a few years ago a kid with a $1000 DV camera and a $1000 computer can now far exceed.
Link Posted: 8/2/2005 7:05:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2005 7:09:38 AM EDT by 37Victor]
I really doubt that'll happen with video games, or film VFX for that matter. The simple fact of the matter is that the more the technology advances, the more the industry demands. The jobs that get dumped in this process are the low end, older-tech jobs (your airbrush artists, for example), not the cutting edge guys. The idea is akin to arguing that home camcorders would ruin Hollywood since anyone can make a movie now, or to the idea that homemade Flash games would ruin the game industry.

As an example of why that's not the case, take a look at the specs and demos of the new XBox 360 or PS3 platforms. The games have now reached a near cinema level of quality. As video games technology increases you need more and better artists, not fewer. The same goes for the film industry. New technology just means that audiences become more and more sophisticated and expect to see the absolute best. You couldn't get away with the VFX in a film today that you could ten years ago. Lock-off shots were far more common, now you're seeing 3D stand-in characters and sophisticated camera moves through CG sets. The industry just demands more.

In all honesty, though, I'm OK with this idea of the computer doing all the work. As long as that idea's prevelant out there, I'm guaranteed a job! There are so many mediocre to no-talent computer operators out there who work off that principle that anyone who actually does work as an artist using the computer as a simple tool is always going to have a job! If you're going to get into this industry, work hard and be an artist, not just a computer programmer.

Edited for spelling.
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