Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
11/24/2017 4:44:23 PM
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/25/2004 3:19:54 PM EST
I have to run 2 dehumidifiers in the basement to keep it from getting funky. If I hook up a small exhaust or attic fan and run it through a dryer vent that is already downstairs, would that move enough air to help take enough moisture out of the air so the dehumidifiers wouldn't have to run sooooo much? It costs a hell of alot to run these things and I need them on all the time because I keep all my guns downstairs. I am assuming a small fan will suck up less juice than the dehumidifiers. Here's a pic of what I am talking about with the vent. Hoping to mount a fan off the rafters and make some kind of vent off the back to funnel the air through the vent in the wall. Any ideas if this will work? Thanks, Terry


Link Posted: 10/25/2004 3:49:24 PM EST
Just a guess, but I doubt it would work very well.
You'd be moving air, but you'll still have the same amount of moisture in the "new" air, no?

Link Posted: 10/25/2004 3:52:50 PM EST
I was thinking it would draw some of the moisture out like a fan in a bathroom would do after you shower. The air it would draw would more than likely be from the upstairs, which is alot dryer. Just my take on it. That's why I thought I would ask around to see what others have to say. Thanks, Terry
Link Posted: 10/25/2004 3:56:52 PM EST
I would attack the problem itself, try a company like all dry or equivalent.
Link Posted: 10/25/2004 3:59:33 PM EST
Only if the air you're moving in is dryer than the air that you're moving out.
Link Posted: 10/25/2004 4:03:18 PM EST
The real question is why is your basement damp?

This might be a better place for you to ask your question.
Link Posted: 10/25/2004 4:03:47 PM EST
My new house runs around 72-75% humidity if I don't keep a dehumidifier running. I noticed it when my SKS started growing a few rust whiskers in my safe despite a plug in Goldenrod.

Link Posted: 10/25/2004 4:05:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/25/2004 4:13:06 PM EST by williedikker72]

Originally Posted By MrClean4Hire:
I would attack the problem itself, try a company like all dry or equivalent.



Been working on the water problem downstairs, but the walls still hold alot of moisture. I'm in an area where ALOT of people get water in there basements and have moisture probs. I am getting to the point now where it has to be a hurricane out there before the water actually seeps in, but the walls still make the area humid. BTW, a buddy at work installed a system to get rid of Radon gas in his basement. The system is really no more than a small fan vented into a PVC pipe. He said a byproduct of the system was that the air in the basement felt alot dryer. Kinda where I got the idea from. Thanks for the suggestions. Terry
Link Posted: 10/25/2004 4:11:54 PM EST
You need a vapor barrier on the inside of the concrete block walls. Block is a sponge, transfers water quite readily. Fans will only work if you can bring in dry air, in the winter you can pull outside air. Summer you are stuck with dehumidifiers. I'd try brushing adhesive on the walls and hanging 6 mil poly vapor barrier on it. Where in PA? Ops
Link Posted: 10/25/2004 4:16:15 PM EST

Originally Posted By Ops:
You need a vapor barrier on the inside of the concrete block walls. Block is a sponge, transfers water quite readily. Fans will only work if you can bring in dry air, in the winter you can pull outside air. Summer you are stuck with dehumidifiers. I'd try brushing adhesive on the walls and hanging 6 mil poly vapor barrier on it. Where in PA? Ops



I'm in York. Where are you? The basement has waterproofing paint on it that was there when I moved in. Only thing is that the assholes that had the house before me initially painted the bare block with regular paint first. The waterproofer was just a selling gimmick. I have been scraping off what paint falls off the walls and been hitting it with waterproofing paint on the bare block. Terry
Top Top