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Posted: 8/12/2007 3:45:44 PM EDT
The Republicans don't have a chance of winning the next Presidency.

Hillary and Obama are the front runners in the Democrat party. Which will win the primary and then the presidency?
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 3:47:26 PM EDT
No.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 3:47:34 PM EDT
What's scary is what if they become a Prez/Vice Prez combo?

The moonbats would shit themselves.

Let's not rule out Romney (gun grabber) and Giuliani (facist gun grabber) though.

Link Posted: 8/12/2007 3:48:40 PM EDT
I was asked this question today. I don't know.

It makes me sick thinkng about it.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 3:49:19 PM EDT
No

Link Posted: 8/12/2007 3:51:11 PM EDT
If Fred doesn't run it will be Hillary.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 3:51:58 PM EDT
I'd guess they take on pres/vice pres myself. But I don't know, maybe some in the midwest will surprise me and not vote for the ultra left. I know a lot of Kennedy Democrats in the Iowa area who are sick with Hilliary & would not vote for her.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 3:57:41 PM EDT
I honestly don't think either one is electable. I think that snake Edwards is though, with some no name douche as his vice.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 3:59:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 4:01:18 PM EDT
Man, I sure hope not...
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 4:08:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2007 4:10:19 PM EDT by Bloencustoms]

Originally Posted By FALARAK:
America isn't ready for either.


Not sure what this means.

Are we not ready for a black president? A woman?

I think that there are plenty of people who would vote for either, if they weren't hillary or b. hussein.

I personally wouldn't, out of fear that they would pander to special interest groups, but that's just me.

If you were talking about those two specific candidates, then I don't think America will EVER be "ready" for people like that. Even if 90% of the people voted for them, it doesn't mean they are ready for them. People make horrible choices all the time.

"Free" is a funny word. You put it in front of housing, food, health care, day care, you name it, the people want it. It's the best thing in the world. everything should be "free".

You put it in front of words like market, state, man, country, then people get all worried and bent out of shape. They start talking about reasonable limitations.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 4:12:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2007 4:12:55 PM EDT by JedYonkers]
i think i'll be moving to gun friendly allbillit dangerous africa

eta {eat me spelling nazis}
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 4:53:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HKArch:
You forgot to put in this poll choice: "Move to a country such as Switzerland because the alternative isn't peaceful."


That's just an empty threat, the same as the democrats who said they would leave if Bush was elected. none of them left.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 5:01:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2007 5:02:48 PM EDT by DocD]

Originally Posted By fivepointoh:
FRED THOMPSON


I haven't given up on the Repubs. Lots of Dems around Maine (liberal, liberal Dems) say they don't like either one. Many of the ones who are voting for Hitlery or Osama seem to just want to show how "open-minded" they are because when I challenge them they can't come up with any good reasons to vote for either one...

edited for grievious(sp?) spelling errors
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 5:08:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DocD:

Originally Posted By fivepointoh:
FRED THOMPSON


I haven't given up on the Repubs. Lots of Dems around Maine (liberal, liberal Dems) say they don't like either one. Many of the ones who are voting for Hitlery or Osama seem to just want to show how "open-minded" they are because when I challenge them they can't come up with any good reasons to vote for either one...

edited for grievious(sp?) spelling errors


If they want a real "black" president, tell them Alan Keyes has been running for long before anyone knew who Osama Bin Bama was.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 5:08:55 PM EDT
Hillary will get the Dem nomination, Fred for the win.

Link Posted: 8/12/2007 5:11:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gordon_freeman:
What's scary is what if they become a Prez/Vice Prez combo?

The moonbats would shit themselves.

Let's not rule out Romney (gun grabber) and Giuliani (facist gun grabber) though.



Never happen. Bad blood between the two and Hillary will want someone who will not try to get the spotlight every chance he gets.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 5:11:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2007 5:12:12 PM EDT by shootsenmeister]

Originally Posted By fivepointoh:
FRED THOMPSON


If you are going to vote for Fred, then VOTE! otherwise stay home
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 6:56:51 PM EDT
I hope not.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 7:04:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jnojr:
but if it's Romney or Giuliani, what would be the point? .


Guiliani will probably get the nod. No worry though, he will lose.

Link Posted: 8/12/2007 7:28:54 PM EDT
In all honesty, I know too many democrats who won't vote for Obama because he's Black and won't vote for Hillary because she's ..... well, Hillary.

Vulcan94
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 7:40:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Vulcan94:
In all honesty, I know too many democrats who won't vote for Obama because he's Black and won't vote for Hillary because she's ..... well, Hillary.


But how many of them will suck it up and vote for the D, rather than take the chance that the "greater evil" R might win? Same goes for us... if another RINO gets nominated, how many of us will kick ourselves and curse, but vote R because it's the "lesser evil"?

Neither party really represents the majority of its' members. both parties are controlled by the radical, extremist fringes. As long as they can continue to present themselves as, "Well, at least we aren't the other guy!" and the average American buys that, our system will not change.

I'd say something cute like, "What if they had an election and nobody came?", but we already have abysmal voter turnout, and it gets worse every election. Most Americans are just sick and tired of the whole crooked process, so more and more, only the most radical Kool-Aid drinkers are rushing out to vote, which further polarizes the country.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 7:51:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CZ75_9MM:
If Fred doesn't run it will be Hillary.


I'd put money on that statement.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 8:10:07 PM EDT
Duncan Hunter.
Link Posted: 8/12/2007 9:13:02 PM EDT

Are we not ready for a black president? A woman?


I'd like to see a thompson/rice ticket myself... That would make the democrat race/sex voters think hard.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 1:40:22 AM EDT
Is Hillary Clinton a Drag on the Party?
By RON FOURNIER,AP
Posted: 2007-08-12 20:52:21
Filed Under: Elections News
WASHINGTON (Aug. 12) - Looking past the presidential nomination fight, Democratic leaders quietly fret that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton at the top of their 2008 ticket could hurt candidates at the bottom.

They say the former first lady may be too polarizing for much of the country. She could jeopardize the party's standing with independent voters and give Republicans who otherwise might stay home on Election Day a reason to vote, they worry.

In more than 40 interviews, Democratic candidates, consultants and party chairs from every region pointed to internal polls that give Clinton strikingly high unfavorable ratings in places with key congressional and state races.

"I'm not sure it would be fatal in Indiana, but she would be a drag" on many candidates, said Democratic state Rep. Dave Crooks of Washington, Ind.

Unlike Crooks, most Democratic leaders agreed to talk frankly about Clinton's political coattails only if they remained anonymous, fearing reprisals from the New York senator's campaign. They all expressed admiration for Clinton, and some said they would publicly support her fierce fight for the nomination -- despite privately held fears.

The chairman of a Midwest state party called Clinton a nightmare for congressional and state legislative candidates.

A Democratic congressman from the West, locked in a close re-election fight, said Clinton is the Democratic candidate most likely to cost him his seat.

A strategist with close ties to leaders in Congress said Democratic Senate candidates in competitive races would be strongly urged to distance themselves from Clinton.

"The argument with Hillary right now in some of these red states is she's so damn unpopular," said Andy Arnold, chairman of the Greenville, S.C., Democratic Party. "I think Hillary is someone who could drive folks on the other side out to vote who otherwise wouldn't."

"Republicans are upset with their candidates," Arnold added, "but she will make up for that by essentially scaring folks to the polls."

In national surveys, Clinton's lead over chief rival Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois has widened. Her advantage is much narrower where it counts most -- in early voting states like Iowa and New Hampshire. In matchups against potential GOP presidential candidates, Clinton leads or is tied.

The Clinton campaign points to those figures to make a case for her electability in a constant stream of e-mails, letters and phone calls to jittery Democrats across the country. A key to their strategy is to give Clinton's candidacy a sense of inevitability despite her negative ratings, which aides insist will go down.

"All the negatives on her are out," said Clinton's pollster and strategist Mark Penn. "There is a phenomena with Hillary, because she is the front-runner and because she's been battling Republicans for so long, her unfavorability (rating) looks higher than what they will eventually be after the nomination and through the general election."

What the Clinton campaign doesn't say is that her edge over potential Republican candidates is much smaller than it should be, given the wide lead the Democratic Party holds over the GOP in generic polling.

The problem is her political baggage: A whopping 49 percent of the public says they have an unfavorable view of Clinton compared to 47 percent who say they hold her in high regard, according to a Gallup Poll survey Aug. 3-5.

Her negative ratings are higher than those of her husband, former President Clinton, former President George H.W. Bush and 2004 Democratic nominee John Kerry at the end of their campaigns.

A candidate's unfavorability scores almost always climb during campaigns. If the pattern holds, Clinton has a historically high hurdle to overcome.

"For Hillary, who has been on the scene for so long and has had perception of her so ground in ... there's no question it will be really hard for her to change perceptions," said Democratic pollster David Eichenbaum, who represents moderate Democrats in GOP-leaning states.

Her baggage is heaviest in those states. Private polling conducted in Colorado, for example, shows that Clinton's negative rating is 16 percentage points higher than her favorability score.

Colorado is a state Democrats hope to win in the 2008 presidential race. It also has an open Senate seat, with the Republican incumbent opting not to seek another term and Democrats targeting it.

Obama has much lower unfavorability ratings than Clinton, though Democrats say he may have his own problem -- that of race. It's hard to measure the impact of being the first party to put a black at the top of the ticket, Democratic leaders said.

Some Democrats hold out hope that Clinton can turn things around.

"She's got a tough road to hoe because people have formed opinions of her," said Rep. Tim Mahoney, a freshman Democrat from Florida. "But I can and will tell you that when I see Hillary get out there with the public, she changes people's minds. She's not the stereotype that people know her to be."

In Indiana, where three freshman Democratic congressmen are fighting to retain their seats, Crooks said Clinton would be a burden in districts like his full of "gun-toting, bible-carrying, God-loving, church-attending" voters.

"She is just so polarizing," the state lawmaker said. Clinton would drag any candidate down 3 or 4 percentage points, he said.

"I'm one of these Democrats who has some legitimate reservations, because the Clintons have in the past invigorated the Republican base," said Carrie Webster, a leader in the West Virginia state House who served as executive director of the state party when Bill Clinton won the 1992 West Virginia primary.

"But the fact that so many prominent Democratic males are getting behind her at this early point makes me a little more confident that she could overcome some of the more obvious hurdles," she said.

Nebraska party chairman Matt Connealy said he believes Democratic candidates will be able to avoid a Clinton backlash.

"I probably would have given you a different answer a month ago," he said, "and maybe will give you a different answer a month from now."

Associated Press writers Kathy Barks Hoffman in Michigan, Marc Levy in Pennsylvania, Lawrence Messina in West Virginia, Steven K. Paulson in Colorado, Kelley Shannon in Texas and Mike A. Smith in Indiana contributed to this report.


Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.
2007-08-12 17:34:55
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 1:43:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dance:
The Republicans don't have a chance of winning the next Presidency.

Hillary and Obama are the front runners in the Democrat party. Which will win the primary and then the presidency?




If anything that piece of shit Giuliani is going to conquer Hillary and Obama.

I don't doubt our next president will be a Republican again, unless we get Romney or Huckabee.

Thompson = Win
Giuliani = Win, but a loss for us Republicans

Everyone was like "LOL R U RED-E 4 DEOMCRATZ in 2oO4?!~!?" and Bush blew Kerry away, after millions were spent against him and even a movie that made tens of millions against him.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 1:58:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl:
Is Hillary Clinton a Drag on the Party?
By RON FOURNIER,AP
Posted: 2007-08-12 20:52:21
Filed Under: Elections News
WASHINGTON (Aug. 12) - Looking past the presidential nomination fight, Democratic leaders quietly fret that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton at the top of their 2008 ticket could hurt candidates at the bottom.

They say the former first lady may be too polarizing for much of the country. She could jeopardize the party's standing with independent voters and give Republicans who otherwise might stay home on Election Day a reason to vote, they worry.

In more than 40 interviews, Democratic candidates, consultants and party chairs from every region pointed to internal polls that give Clinton strikingly high unfavorable ratings in places with key congressional and state races.

"I'm not sure it would be fatal in Indiana, but she would be a drag" on many candidates, said Democratic state Rep. Dave Crooks of Washington, Ind.

Unlike Crooks, most Democratic leaders agreed to talk frankly about Clinton's political coattails only if they remained anonymous, fearing reprisals from the New York senator's campaign. They all expressed admiration for Clinton, and some said they would publicly support her fierce fight for the nomination -- despite privately held fears.

The chairman of a Midwest state party called Clinton a nightmare for congressional and state legislative candidates.

A Democratic congressman from the West, locked in a close re-election fight, said Clinton is the Democratic candidate most likely to cost him his seat.

A strategist with close ties to leaders in Congress said Democratic Senate candidates in competitive races would be strongly urged to distance themselves from Clinton.

"The argument with Hillary right now in some of these red states is she's so damn unpopular," said Andy Arnold, chairman of the Greenville, S.C., Democratic Party. "I think Hillary is someone who could drive folks on the other side out to vote who otherwise wouldn't."
"Republicans are upset with their candidates," Arnold added, "but she will make up for that by essentially scaring folks to the polls."

In national surveys, Clinton's lead over chief rival Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois has widened. Her advantage is much narrower where it counts most -- in early voting states like Iowa and New Hampshire. In matchups against potential GOP presidential candidates, Clinton leads or is tied.

The Clinton campaign points to those figures to make a case for her electability in a constant stream of e-mails, letters and phone calls to jittery Democrats across the country. A key to their strategy is to give Clinton's candidacy a sense of inevitability despite her negative ratings, which aides insist will go down.

"All the negatives on her are out," said Clinton's pollster and strategist Mark Penn. "There is a phenomena with Hillary, because she is the front-runner and because she's been battling Republicans for so long, her unfavorability (rating) looks higher than what they will eventually be after the nomination and through the general election."

What the Clinton campaign doesn't say is that her edge over potential Republican candidates is much smaller than it should be, given the wide lead the Democratic Party holds over the GOP in generic polling.

The problem is her political baggage: A whopping 49 percent of the public says they have an unfavorable view of Clinton compared to 47 percent who say they hold her in high regard, according to a Gallup Poll survey Aug. 3-5.

Her negative ratings are higher than those of her husband, former President Clinton, former President George H.W. Bush and 2004 Democratic nominee John Kerry at the end of their campaigns.

A candidate's unfavorability scores almost always climb during campaigns. If the pattern holds, Clinton has a historically high hurdle to overcome.

"For Hillary, who has been on the scene for so long and has had perception of her so ground in ... there's no question it will be really hard for her to change perceptions," said Democratic pollster David Eichenbaum, who represents moderate Democrats in GOP-leaning states.

Her baggage is heaviest in those states. Private polling conducted in Colorado, for example, shows that Clinton's negative rating is 16 percentage points higher than her favorability score.

Colorado is a state Democrats hope to win in the 2008 presidential race. It also has an open Senate seat, with the Republican incumbent opting not to seek another term and Democrats targeting it.

Obama has much lower unfavorability ratings than Clinton, though Democrats say he may have his own problem -- that of race. It's hard to measure the impact of being the first party to put a black at the top of the ticket, Democratic leaders said.

Some Democrats hold out hope that Clinton can turn things around.

"She's got a tough road to hoe because people have formed opinions of her," said Rep. Tim Mahoney, a freshman Democrat from Florida. "But I can and will tell you that when I see Hillary get out there with the public, she changes people's minds. She's not the stereotype that people know her to be."

In Indiana, where three freshman Democratic congressmen are fighting to retain their seats, Crooks said Clinton would be a burden in districts like his full of "gun-toting, bible-carrying, God-loving, church-attending" voters.

"She is just so polarizing," the state lawmaker said. Clinton would drag any candidate down 3 or 4 percentage points, he said.

"I'm one of these Democrats who has some legitimate reservations, because the Clintons have in the past invigorated the Republican base," said Carrie Webster, a leader in the West Virginia state House who served as executive director of the state party when Bill Clinton won the 1992 West Virginia primary.

"But the fact that so many prominent Democratic males are getting behind her at this early point makes me a little more confident that she could overcome some of the more obvious hurdles," she said.

Nebraska party chairman Matt Connealy said he believes Democratic candidates will be able to avoid a Clinton backlash.

"I probably would have given you a different answer a month ago," he said, "and maybe will give you a different answer a month from now."

Associated Press writers Kathy Barks Hoffman in Michigan, Marc Levy in Pennsylvania, Lawrence Messina in West Virginia, Steven K. Paulson in Colorado, Kelley Shannon in Texas and Mike A. Smith in Indiana contributed to this report.


Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.
2007-08-12 17:34:55


So the Democrats are afraid that the American people will turn out in large numbers to vote?

I thought that that encouraging the electortate to vote was the idea of having an election in a free country.

I suppose the Democrats feel differently, but I'm amazed they would come out and say such a thing.

Link Posted: 8/13/2007 3:43:27 AM EDT
If that happens I will likely defect to Canada.

First, I need to figure out how many liters my cars takes.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 3:58:31 AM EDT

It cannot be good if either Hillary or Obama wins. It's a truly SHTF situation in my book. There I exercised my first amendment right.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 4:21:41 AM EDT
Hillary definitely has a chance I'm afraid to admit.

However, what do you guys think about her getting the majority of votes in the "red" states. I think Ohio might go over to Hillary?

Wasn't Ohio the deciding State in the 2004 elections?

Looking at this state by state, it doesn't look good but it ain't over yet IMHO.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 4:40:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CZ75_9MM:
If Fred doesn't run it will be Hillary.


This might happen! And it makes me sick!!!!
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 5:41:25 AM EDT
Neither. Both have more than enough people to vote against them.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 8:06:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RDak:
However, what do you guys think about her getting the majority of votes in the "red" states. I think Ohio might go over to Hillary?



Realistically it's only a couple of million votes difference that actually elects a president.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 8:08:44 AM EDT
That would be terrible.
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 8:21:07 AM EDT
Edwards is a slam dunk for the Dems-which is why I don't want him to run.

Hilliary is a 50/50 chance of winning-she is too hated, even within her party. I have ran into a few Democrats who won't vote for her-one said he would even vote for a moderate Republican over Hilliary.

It's over a year away..we will see....
Link Posted: 8/13/2007 8:23:39 AM EDT
Just think of how much your firearms collections would be worth if Hillary were elected President. She would surely push for more restrictions.
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