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Posted: 8/4/2009 7:54:32 AM EST
H2O ––––2 parts hydrogen, 1 part oxygen
Hydrogen is very flammable, Oxygen is a propellant.
When combined, why won't it burn ?
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 7:58:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 7:58:58 AM EST by Burntrubber87]
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:02:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:03:03 AM EST
because it's wet????
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:03:08 AM EST
water don't burn because it's wet......dumbass
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:04:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:09:04 AM EST by Nasal_Avenger]
Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.


That's because you are separating out both the Oxygen and the Hydrogen. Burntrubber is correct. If you took that "flammable Hydrogen" and heated it in the presence of the Oxygen you also got out it would burn (combine) and become water again.

ETA: Also water is flammable in the presence of elemental fluorine which would just pull the hydrogen off the oxygen and create oxygen gas.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:05:23 AM EST
It will burn if its on a treadmill.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:07:03 AM EST
You could say the same thing about salt:
"How come every time I put sodium and chlorine on my tortilla chips, I always end up in the hospital?"
salt is NaCl for the slower crowd
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:07:07 AM EST
Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.


or , not sure which
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:07:42 AM EST

Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.

LOL. You can disagree all you want but you are still wrong.

For every hydrogen atom you remove from water, you also release two oxygen atoms. Mix the two and guess what? The hydrogen oxides and...


wait for it...


you get WATER!

Water is oxidized hydrogen. Burning is a common name for rapid oxidation.

You need to revisit HS Chemistry.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:10:33 AM EST
As above, water doesn't burn because it is already oxidised.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:11:52 AM EST
Because you would have to add energy to break the bonds that were made when hydrogen was burned in the presence of oxygen in the first place. Since there is not enough energy to break down water into hydrogen to burn and free oxygen to consume as part of the burning process you basically get a wet match. Its the same reason carbon monoxide or dioxide is used as an extinguisher: the oxygen isn't free to bond with other elements during the burning process like atmospheric oxygen because there isn't enough energy to break the bonds.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:12:31 AM EST
Water is not flammable because it contains no phlogiston.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:12:38 AM EST
It'll burn if you get it hot enough to rip the molecules apart. Try throwing water on a full-on thermite fire and see what happens I suggest not being close.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:12:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:16:25 AM EST by ColtAllure]
"Burning" means something combines with oxygen and gets into a lower energy state, while giving off heat.

If water burned it might become hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (among other things). But hydrogen peroxide has higher energy than water does, it decomposes into water while giving off heat.

Extracting flammable H2 from water takes more energy than burning the H2 gives off (due to the inevitable inefficiencies).

I don't think the water is burning when put on a thermite fire, I think it's helping the thermite burn by acting as an oxidizer.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:13:01 AM EST
why can't you burn it and get H202 (hydrogen peroxide)?
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:13:33 AM EST
Originally Posted By TerribleTom:

Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.

LOL. You can disagree all you want but you are still wrong.

For every hydrogen atom you remove from water, you also release two oxygen atoms. Mix the two and guess what? The hydrogen oxides and...


wait for it...


you get WATER!

Water is oxidized hydrogen. Burning is a common name for rapid oxidation.

You need to revisit HS Chemistry.


Never took HS chemistry.
Just seems from the componets it would be highly flammable ( but we all know it's not)
So in theory, water could be seperated and burnt over and over again ?
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:14:38 AM EST
Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you: "Plane on a treadmill 2009"
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:14:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:16:43 AM EST by Nasal_Avenger]
Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By TerribleTom:

Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.

LOL. You can disagree all you want but you are still wrong.

For every hydrogen atom you remove from water, you also release two oxygen atoms. Mix the two and guess what? The hydrogen oxides and...


wait for it...


you get WATER!

Water is oxidized hydrogen. Burning is a common name for rapid oxidation.

You need to revisit HS Chemistry.


Never took HS chemistry.
Just seems from the componets it would be highly flammable ( but we all know it's not)
So in theory, water could be seperated and burnt over and over again ?


Yes, but you would need to add a little energy each time because no process is 100% efficient.

ETA: How did you graduate without taking a science course that mentioned this? My school did it in 6th grade. Not mocking you, serious question.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:14:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By California_Kid:
Water is not flammable because it contains no phlogiston.


Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:15:04 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:18:33 AM EST by Parana1]
creating water releases energy (exothermic)
producing h2 and o2 from water requires energy (endothermic)

asking why water doesn't burn is like asking why rocks can't roll uphill?

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:15:55 AM EST

Originally Posted By mushroomhead130:
You could say the same thing about salt:
"How come every time I put sodium and chlorine on my tortilla chips, I always end up in the hospital?"
salt is NaCl for the slower crowd


Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:18:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:19:53 AM EST by packingXDs]
Like from the toilet?
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:19:21 AM EST

Originally Posted By ScaryBlackGuns:
It will burn if its on a treadmill.

i fucking lol'd.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:19:34 AM EST
<Patiently waits for Keith_J to settle this.>
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:20:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By TerribleTom:

Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.

LOL. You can disagree all you want but you are still wrong.

For every hydrogen atom you remove from water, you also release two oxygen atoms. Mix the two and guess what? The hydrogen oxides and...


wait for it...


you get WATER!

Water is oxidized hydrogen. Burning is a common name for rapid oxidation.

You need to revisit HS Chemistry.



Sounds like someone needs to tag along with him.


Water WILL "burn," after a fashion.

Combustion is a rapid oxidation reaction, generally accompanied by a release of energy in the form of heat and light. As water is already a stable molecule containing oxygen, it cannot combine with more oxygen to facilitate combustion. However, in the presence of other materials, particularly alkali metals, the oxygen in the water will have a greater affinity for these ions than for the hydrogen it is already bonded to. The oxygen will leave the hydrogen in order to oxidize the alkali metal, freeing the hydrogen in the form of binary gas. This oxidation reaction produces heat and light, though it is technically the metal which is "burning."

Under proper conditions, the heat generated by the oxidation of the alkali metal will initiate the combustion of the liberated hydrogen gas using any surrounding air as an oxygen source. This would create water again and, again under ideal circumstances, the cycle can continue until either the alkali metal or the air source is depleted.

The water is not technically burning, but it might look like it is.


So the answer is that, if you're loose enough with your deffinition of "burn" then yes, water can be burned.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:20:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By ColtAllure:
"Burning" means something combines with oxygen and gets into a lower energy state, while giving off heat.

If water burned it might become hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (among other things). But hydrogen peroxide has higher energy than water does, it decomposes into water while giving off heat.

Extracting flammable H2 from water takes more energy than burning the H2 gives off (due to the inevitable inefficiencies).

I don't think the water is burning when put on a thermite fire, I think it's helping the thermite burn by acting as an oxidizer.


True, but the results are just as fun
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:21:04 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:24:02 AM EST by Mateba]
Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By TerribleTom:

Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.

LOL. You can disagree all you want but you are still wrong.

For every hydrogen atom you remove from water, you also release two oxygen atoms. Mix the two and guess what? The hydrogen oxides and...


wait for it...


you get WATER!

Water is oxidized hydrogen. Burning is a common name for rapid oxidation.

You need to revisit HS Chemistry.


Never took HS chemistry.
Just seems from the componets it would be highly flammable ( but we all know it's not)
So in theory, water could be seperated and burnt over and over again ?


It takes energy to separate H&O, when it combines it releases energy. That's like saying why can't I make my spring air pellet gun full auto?

And just because elements behave one way in their atomic states doesn't mean it will behave the same way when it's combined with other elements (or itself) to make molecules. Otherwise salt would blow up in water and bleach our clothes at the same time.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:21:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By Mike_314:
As above, water doesn't burn because it is already oxidised.

Someone gets it.


Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:21:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By Nasal_Avenger:
Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By TerribleTom:

Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.

LOL. You can disagree all you want but you are still wrong.

For every hydrogen atom you remove from water, you also release two oxygen atoms. Mix the two and guess what? The hydrogen oxides and...


wait for it...


you get WATER!

Water is oxidized hydrogen. Burning is a common name for rapid oxidation.

You need to revisit HS Chemistry.


Never took HS chemistry.
Just seems from the componets it would be highly flammable ( but we all know it's not)
So in theory, water could be seperated and burnt over and over again ?


Yes, but you would need to add a little energy each time because no process is 100% efficient.

ETA: How did you graduate without taking a science course that mentioned this? My school did it in 6th grade. Not mocking you, serious question.


I graduated in 1978 from a small rural school.
At that time there was no such thing as HS chemistry in that school district.
I did take a biology class that was available.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:22:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By ScaryBlackGuns:
It will burn if its on a treadmill.


Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:22:45 AM EST

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
water don't burn because it's wet......dumbass


Didn't the Cuyahoga River catch fire once?
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:23:15 AM EST
Originally Posted By TerribleTom:
LOL. You can disagree all you want but you are still wrong.
For every hydrogen atom you remove from water, you also release two oxygen atoms. Mix the two and guess what? The hydrogen oxides and...
wait for it...


you get WATER!

Water is oxidized hydrogen. Burning is a common name for rapid oxidation.

You need to revisit HS Chemistry.


Maybe you need to revisit HS chem. It is two H for every O.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:23:41 AM EST
Think of it like this…

Water is hydrogen ash. It’s hydrogen that has already been burned, so it can’t burn no more.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:24:19 AM EST
I remember reading about this river in Ohio that caught on fire once...
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:27:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By Thuban:
Think of it like this…

Water is hydrogen ash. It’s hydrogen that has already been burned, so it can’t burn no more.


Best explanation for a simpleton like me
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:28:22 AM EST
You mean water, like in the toilet?
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:28:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By Parana1:
creating water releases energy (exothermic)
producing h2 and o2 from water requires energy (endothermic)

asking why water doesn't burn is like asking why rocks can't roll uphill?


Another excellent analogy. ENERGY. Hydrogen has a but load of potential energy, like a rock on the top of a hill. When it combines with oxygen, the energy is released to heat and a bit of light, this is like the rock in motion going down the hill, kinetic energy.

Now react the water with sodium, aluminum, calcium or many other metals/metal oxides and the water reacts, releasing a hydrogen to become the metal hydroxide, also releasing a lot of heat. But that energy came from the metal, not the water. This potential energy was enough to kick off the hydrogen.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:37:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:38:27 AM EST by The_Macallan]


Well if water is not flammable, why is it not considered inflammable then?


Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:38:10 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:40:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By ColtAllure:
"Burning" means something combines with oxygen and gets into a lower energy state, while giving off heat.

If water burned it might become hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (among other things). But hydrogen peroxide has higher energy than water does, it decomposes into water while giving off heat.

Extracting flammable H2 from water takes more energy than burning the H2 gives off (due to the inevitable inefficiencies).

I don't think the water is burning when put on a thermite fire, I think it's helping the thermite burn by acting as an oxidizer.




You get an aura of burning H when it gets to the atmosphere and combines with the O2 there.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:42:46 AM EST
Originally Posted By eracer:

Originally Posted By jmzd4:
water don't burn because it's wet......dumbass


Didn't the Cuyahoga River catch fire once?




A floating film of Stoddard solvent and Cosmoline burned.
Some idiots were de-greasing a crane upriver and flowing the solvent into the river.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:43:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By The_Macallan:


Well if water is not flammable, why is it not considered inflammable then?



Unpossible.

Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:44:28 AM EST
We wouldn't want O's feet to get hot when he's walking on it...
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:44:41 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:45:58 AM EST by BushBoar]
Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
H2O ––––2 parts hydrogen, 1 part oxygen
Hydrogen is very flammable, Oxygen is a propellant.
When combined, why won't it burn ?


Just because the constituents of a chemical have a certain property, does not mean that that compound will have that property.
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:46:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/4/2009 8:46:59 AM EST by 2theLeft]


Keith has spoken..
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:47:32 AM EST
why hasn't anyone said, "Because it's fucking water!!!!!"
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:53:06 AM EST
Originally Posted By Lightning1960:
Originally Posted By Burntrubber87:
Because water is hydrogen that has already burned. H2+O2 is different than H20 (molecules combined)


Have to disagree, because, flammable hydrogen can be removed from water.




Somebody failed chemistry huh?

If separate hydrogen from water it is no longer water (H2O) its hydrogen... DUH
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 8:59:37 AM EST

Originally Posted By peekay:

Originally Posted By The_Macallan:


Well if water is not flammable, why is it not considered inflammable then?



Unpossible.





Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:11:55 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/4/2009 9:12:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By ScaryBlackGuns:
It will burn if its on a treadmill.




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