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Posted: 4/28/2011 8:50:09 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:00:50 PM EDT
Long waits for serious things.  Just what I have heard from Canadians that I've met.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:28:05 PM EDT
The Good: You get free* stuff.
The Bad: You'll die while you're waiting to get it.

*Free = Paid for by Canadian taxpayers

Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:31:17 PM EDT
Quoted:
The Good: You get free* stuff.
The Bad: You'll die while you're waiting to get it.

*Free = Paid for by Canadian taxpayers



Free stuff??? In the same way that welfare is free?

Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:34:07 PM EDT



Quoted:



Quoted:

The Good: You get free* stuff.

The Bad: You'll die while you're waiting to get it.



*Free = Paid for by Canadian taxpayers






Free stuff??? In the same way that welfare is free?





Did you notice the bright red asterisk?



 
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:39:41 PM EDT
There was some celebrity chick who died after being in an accident on a PQ ski resort. She died due to some aspect of the CDN med system being closed on the weekend. Closed on the weekend.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:48:05 PM EDT
Health care is like Canada's dirty little secret. it takes like a third of our federal gov. budget and SOOOOO many aspects are not covered. ANY prescritpion drugs, ambulance rides, some specialty doctors.

Then you have the waiting times for emergency. I waited like 4 or 5 hours to get examined after i got hit by a car (as a pedestrian). WTF.

Our hosptals are FULL of obese or homeless people taking up beds and valuable time. Nurses are unionized so they get 3 or 4 weeks vacation to start off, and start at like 50 G a year for fairly basic stuff... of course they strike at the drop of a hat.


Its an enormous money pit and it literally does cater to the lowest common denominator. guys that really NEED the help cant even PAY to get it!
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:48:20 PM EDT





Quoted:



There was some celebrity chick who died after being in an accident on a PQ ski resort. She died due to some aspect of the CDN med system being closed on the weekend. Closed on the weekend.



Liam Neeson's wife.





Quebec does not have medivac choppers.





They did casevac in a truck, and of course it took too long.





 
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:51:22 PM EDT




Quoted:

Long waits for serious things. Just what I have heard from Canadians that I've met.




My parents live in BC. My dad needs a hip replacement. He is waiting to get on the waiting list, to get the surgery. Its been almost 2 years now.



Yes, you read that right. The "waiting list" is artificially limited in size so that the delay is hidden.





Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:57:18 PM EDT
My PCP is from Canada. Told me they have max limits on the number of procedures they can perform, so once a doctor performs "x" many instances of a certain procedure, he's done performing that procedure for the year. Hence long waits.

They pay up to 50% income tax to pay for their "free" healthcare, and still purchase "supplemental insurance" to get better coverage.

He worked in an ER in Montreal. They had 2 Emergency Rooms - one for Canadians with regular healthcare and a separate area for those with suplemental health insurance.

Two years ago the President of the Canadian Medical Association stated in an interview that Canada's healthcare system was on the verge of financial collapse, and several weeks later the Canadian PM publicly stated that Canada's health care system couldn't take care of its people.

I guess the Canadian Health Minister (or whatever the title is) coming to the US for medical treatment pretty much says it all................

My doctor said he came to the US so he could actually practice medicine, and pointed out that there are more MRI machines per citizen in the US  than any other country in the world. He also said he liked that priority of care in American ER's was based strictly on the severity of illness/ijuries, but that in Canada the amount of supplemental health insurance you buy often determined priority of care because hospitals are so desperate for money.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 10:08:24 PM EDT
Quoted:
They pay up to 50% income tax to pay for their "free" healthcare, and still purchase "supplemental insurance" to get better coverage.

He worked in an ER in Montreal. They had 2 Emergency Rooms - one for Canadians with regular healthcare and a separate area for those with suplemental health insurance.


Purchasing "supplemental health insurance" is now openly recommended by Canadian health care officials - They no longer even bother to hide the fact that the public health care system doesn't cut it.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 10:13:56 PM EDT
I've broken seventeen bones, had dozens of stitches, wrecked my Patella tendon plus other sicknesses and goofy injuries (from BC). Never had a problem, wait time or issue with any segment of Canadian healthcare. What can I say? I'm not making it up. Always treated well, repaired and sent on my way. My daughter was born in Vancouver and the experience was great. Multiple days in the hospital due to a late C-section cost $0.00.

I now live in the US. I've slowed down a lot the older I've gotten and now have two kids. My son was born in the United States and even with the great insurance we have here our part of the tab was about $6-7000.00 or so. I blew my knee out a few months after I moved here and waited 3 months for surgery and was out of pocket about $4,000.00. Not a complaint and the medical treatment was fine, facilities great but since you asked for an explanation I will say:

I have had no bad experiences back home and out of my circle of family and friends have no horror stories at all.

My insurance premiums here in America are $854.00 / month. I can't speak for people coming to the US for life saving treatment because I haven't been there. I know the heath care system is not perfect in Canada by any means but I hate to see the down and out folks here that have no options for care whereas back home at least they can go see the Doc.

Link Posted: 4/28/2011 10:30:24 PM EDT
Quoted:
They tout it like it's the best thing ever yet thousands of our brothers from the north come to the U.S. seeking life saving along with routine treatments.

Please explain this.


My "Canadienne" ex sure loved their healthcare system. Paid for her father's cancer treatments.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 11:30:48 PM EDT
Quoted:
I've broken seventeen bones, had dozens of stitches, wrecked my Patella tendon plus other sicknesses and goofy injuries (from BC). Never had a problem, wait time or issue with any segment of Canadian healthcare. What can I say? I'm not making it up. Always treated well, repaired and sent on my way. My daughter was born in Vancouver and the experience was great. Multiple days in the hospital due to a late C-section cost $0.00.

I now live in the US. I've slowed down a lot the older I've gotten and now have two kids. My son was born in the United States and even with the great insurance we have here our part of the tab was about $6-7000.00 or so. I blew my knee out a few months after I moved here and waited 3 months for surgery and was out of pocket about $4,000.00. Not a complaint and the medical treatment was fine, facilities great but since you asked for an explanation I will say:

I have had no bad experiences back home and out of my circle of family and friends have no horror stories at all.

My insurance premiums here in America are $854.00 / month. I can't speak for people coming to the US for life saving treatment because I haven't been there. I know the heath care system is not perfect in Canada by any means but I hate to see the down and out folks here that have no options for care whereas back home at least they can go see the Doc.



question:

In BC What % of your income went to taxes, and what % of that goes to healthcare?  Is that number less than,equal to, or exceed the ammount you pay monthly here in the US(including co pays)?
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 11:35:25 PM EDT



Quoted:



Quoted:

I've broken seventeen bones, had dozens of stitches, wrecked my Patella tendon plus other sicknesses and goofy injuries (from BC). Never had a problem, wait time or issue with any segment of Canadian healthcare. What can I say? I'm not making it up. Always treated well, repaired and sent on my way. My daughter was born in Vancouver and the experience was great. Multiple days in the hospital due to a late C-section cost $0.00.



I now live in the US. I've slowed down a lot the older I've gotten and now have two kids. My son was born in the United States and even with the great insurance we have here our part of the tab was about $6-7000.00 or so. I blew my knee out a few months after I moved here and waited 3 months for surgery and was out of pocket about $4,000.00. Not a complaint and the medical treatment was fine, facilities great but since you asked for an explanation I will say:



I have had no bad experiences back home and out of my circle of family and friends have no horror stories at all.



My insurance premiums here in America are $854.00 / month. I can't speak for people coming to the US for life saving treatment because I haven't been there. I know the heath care system is not perfect in Canada by any means but I hate to see the down and out folks here that have no options for care whereas back home at least they can go see the Doc.







question:



In BC What % of your income went to taxes, and what % of that goes to healthcare?  Is that number less than,equal to, or exceed the ammount you pay monthly here in the US(including co pays)?
also why the hell are you paying 854 a month? You could get a high deductible plan for about 150  a month. Im betting the difference in taxes over there is nothing compared to meeting your deductible here and paying out of pocket for all the little shit.  You are paying several thousands of dollars a year more than you should be.





 
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 11:38:00 PM EDT
They don't close on the weekends. Seriously. Is there a way to ignore all posts from the midwest?

Anyways Canadian healthcare can suck.

I broke my arm in Canada when I was working there as a U.S. Citizen. I was treated very well, the wait times in the ER were less than a typical US metro, they didn't want to see my insurance card. After about an hour and a half the bone was set, the cast was on, and I was sent packing with a smile from the staff, no bill.

I am sure if I needed a kidney it would have been a different story. Though this was in Quebec. I think they may have it MUCH better than the brits, but that could just be population density related.

ETA: One of the reasons our little brothers and sisters come stateside is because we have more specialists. Another racket.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 11:58:03 PM EDT
The only people I ever see talking about the long waits are people that don't live in Canada. I also live in a smaller town though so the hospital is not packed all the time.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 12:04:14 AM EDT
The way it works is each Province has their own health system, wait times vary per Province for various surgeries.

I have no problems and have not, my mother had 2 Cardiac arrests and a mild stroke 2 years ago they saved her life and cost an ambulance ride.

The last time i went to emerg for stiches in and out in 30 min.

Serioulsy overblown smack talk on the system and our costs per taxpayer, non emergency surgeries have to wait as they should. I have two sisters one in MN one in GA take the cost of private insurance add it to your income taxes and it equals out as far as tax rates go!!!
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 12:05:14 AM EDT
I'm curious as to what the state of Canada's health care system would be if they had the massive amounts of non-paying illegal aliens we do.




Link Posted: 4/29/2011 12:09:53 AM EDT





Quoted:



I'm curious as to what the state of Canada's health care system would be if they had the massive amounts of non-paying illegal aliens we do.








and the amount of fat people and alcoholics.  Everyone ignores the fact that we have double the health problems self inflicted yet our care still manages to keep up.  Swap out any other country with our fat non vegetable eatin asses and watch their healthcare system divide by zero.





 
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 12:14:21 AM EDT





Quoted:
Quoted:


I'm curious as to what the state of Canada's health care system would be if they had the massive amounts of non-paying illegal aliens we do.








and the amount of fat people and alcoholics.  Everyone ignores the fact that we have double the health problems self inflicted yet our care still manages to keep up.  Swap out any other country with our fat non vegetable eatin asses and watch their healthcare system divide by zero.


 



Also, the United States pretty much subsidizes the R&D for the rest of the world in pharma as well as medical research from what I gather.





How many new life saving drugs came out of Canada or the UK last year?  I don't know, but I would guess somewhere between very few, and none.





My point is I don't think these socialized systems can operate in a vacuum.





 
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 12:16:42 AM EDT
Quoted:
I'm curious as to what the state of Canada's health care system would be if they had the massive amounts of non-paying illegal aliens we do.



Probably not very good! add the unemployed and people using your medicade and medicare the costs are probably higher per capita in the US including private insurance costs.

One thing we do have is specialty DR's leaving to make bigger money in the US.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 12:27:56 AM EDT
Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
I'm curious as to what the state of Canada's health care system would be if they had the massive amounts of non-paying illegal aliens we do.


and the amount of fat people and alcoholics.  Everyone ignores the fact that we have double the health problems self inflicted yet our care still manages to keep up.  Swap out any other country with our fat non vegetable eatin asses and watch their healthcare system divide by zero.
 

Also, the United States pretty much subsidizes the R&D for the rest of the world in pharma as well as medical research from what I gather.

How many new life saving drugs came out of Canada or the UK last year?  I don't know, but I would guess somewhere between very few, and none.

My point is I don't think these socialized systems can operate in a vacuum.
 


Some of your points are valid as far as drug subsidies, our Govt caps what the drug companies can charge for drugs so we get them cheaper than you do, why do so many of your seniors come to Canada to buy drugs, because they cant afford them at home.

Research is another story our Universities keep up on the research part of it.

The big problem is how to cut the red tape and make the system more efficiant, if you can fix that the system will be better im not saying its perfect, but one thing look at the revenues of the insurance companies in the US that money is coming from your pockets and the companies that pay their portion.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 12:39:07 AM EDT



Quoted:



Quoted:




Quoted:




Quoted:

I'm curious as to what the state of Canada's health care system would be if they had the massive amounts of non-paying illegal aliens we do.





and the amount of fat people and alcoholics.  Everyone ignores the fact that we have double the health problems self inflicted yet our care still manages to keep up.  Swap out any other country with our fat non vegetable eatin asses and watch their healthcare system divide by zero.

 


Also, the United States pretty much subsidizes the R&D for the rest of the world in pharma as well as medical research from what I gather.



How many new life saving drugs came out of Canada or the UK last year?  I don't know, but I would guess somewhere between very few, and none.



My point is I don't think these socialized systems can operate in a vacuum.

 




Some of your points are valid as far as drug subsidies, our Govt caps what the drug companies can charge for drugs so we get them cheaper than you do, why do so many of your seniors come to Canada to buy drugs, because they cant afford them at home.



Research is another story our Universities keep up on the research part of it.



The big problem is how to cut the red tape and make the system more efficiant, if you can fix that the system will be better im not saying its perfect, but one thing look at the revenues of the insurance companies in the US that money is coming from your pockets and the companies that pay their portion.


Insurance rates are so high because medical treatment is so high.  Medical treatment is so high because a large portion of people don't pay their share, the 15 million + illegals, plus a ton of other assholes living off a system they never paid into.  I pay a lot becuase I have to pay for the other guy as well as myself every time I go to the doctor.



My opinion is that the answer isn't more government, but less.  All of these entitlement schemes will ultimately fail.  When you punish the producers and reward the parasites, all you're going to get is more parasites.  To me it's common sense.  The US is rapidly reaching a point where the ticks are going to outweigh the dog.



It's fortunate for you guys that your system seems to be working as well as it does, don't get me wrong, I'm glad you don't have people dying in the street, but your much more homogeneous and relatively small population makes your drive towards the cliff a much slower one than ours is going to be.
 
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 12:46:25 AM EDT
Quoted:

Quoted:
Quoted:

Quoted:

Quoted:
I'm curious as to what the state of Canada's health care system would be if they had the massive amounts of non-paying illegal aliens we do.


and the amount of fat people and alcoholics.  Everyone ignores the fact that we have double the health problems self inflicted yet our care still manages to keep up.  Swap out any other country with our fat non vegetable eatin asses and watch their healthcare system divide by zero.
 

Also, the United States pretty much subsidizes the R&D for the rest of the world in pharma as well as medical research from what I gather.

How many new life saving drugs came out of Canada or the UK last year?  I don't know, but I would guess somewhere between very few, and none.

My point is I don't think these socialized systems can operate in a vacuum.
 


Some of your points are valid as far as drug subsidies, our Govt caps what the drug companies can charge for drugs so we get them cheaper than you do, why do so many of your seniors come to Canada to buy drugs, because they cant afford them at home.

Research is another story our Universities keep up on the research part of it.

The big problem is how to cut the red tape and make the system more efficiant, if you can fix that the system will be better im not saying its perfect, but one thing look at the revenues of the insurance companies in the US that money is coming from your pockets and the companies that pay their portion.

Insurance rates are so high because medical treatment is so high.  Medical treatment is so high because a large portion of people don't pay their share, the 15 million + illegals, plus a ton of other assholes living off a system they never paid into.  I pay a lot becuase I have to pay for the other guy as well as myself every time I go to the doctor.

My opinion is that the answer isn't more government, but less.  All of these entitlement schemes will ultimately fail.  When you punish the producers and reward the parasites, all you're going to get is more parasites.  To me it's common sense.  The US is rapidly reaching a point where the ticks are going to outweigh the dog.

It's fortunate for you guys that your system seems to be working as well as it does, don't get me wrong, I'm glad you don't have people dying in the street, but your much more homogeneous and relatively small population makes your drive towards the cliff a much slower one than ours is going to be.


 


I agree with what your saying govt should be smaller and more efficiant, it really is unsustainable. In reality what is and will save us from the cliff for a while is we are a huge exporter of raw materials (ie:commodities and the taxs the govt pulls from those) and the lower population relative to that income.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 1:10:50 AM EDT
Quoted:
Serioulsy overblown smack talk on the system and our costs per taxpayer, non emergency surgeries have to wait as they should. I have two sisters one in MN one in GA take the cost of private insurance add it to your income taxes and it equals out as far as tax rates go!!!

Its not overblown smack talk. Its a broken and getting worse. And this is only after 50ish years of being implemented.

The system is currently just able to deal with critical things, such as heart attack and to a lesser extent cancer treatments, quite well. Chronic things such as joint replacement, anything that isn't life threatening, good luck you are on a waiting list.

You tell someone in pain everyday that they are lucky their wait list for hip or knee replacement is 2 years.

But the kicker is its illegal to jump cue. You can't within the Canadian system say, "ok, screw it, I'm going to pay for faster treatment". So there you sit like a good little Canadian waiting for the Government to tell you its your turn to be blessed with what little they are going to meter out your way.

Hence, you have people getting frustrated and paying out of pocket to have their procedures done in the US or abroad. (Our politicians are even doing it which tells you something besides being incredibly funny)

There is no such thing as "free" health care. There sure is such a thing called socialist sense of entitlement though. Like the "I pay taxes so I'm entitled to my free health care". Hence you get ERs plugged with people with sniffles and a top heavy bureaucratic system with no capacity.

Disturbing to me of late is more and more the arguement "well, your health care is paid by everyone" to justify labelling something or some activity as "risky", so therefore we must think of banning it. Personal choice and personal responsibilty are more and more a foreign concept in Canada.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 1:15:19 AM EDT
Interesting first hand observations.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 3:17:57 AM EDT
My understanding from a documentary called "Dead Meat" I saw linked from here a few years ago was 3 year wait for knee replacement surgery.

My mom has degenerative knee disease.  If she had to wait 3 years she'd be in a wheelchair.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 3:24:00 AM EDT
Quoted:
They tout it like it's the best thing ever yet thousands of our brothers from the north come to the U.S. seeking life saving along with routine treatments.

Please explain this.



Look real closely at who the "They" is doing the touting.

In many areas of this country, "they" tout the glories of section 8.


Link Posted: 4/29/2011 3:24:03 AM EDT
The only way for Canada to control the cost of national health care is to deny service. They do this through looooooooooooooooooong waiting times. IOW, they hope you go elsewhere (US), give up or die first.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 3:29:16 AM EDT
I got hit by a tractor trailer while driving my car home from drill weekend outside London  Ontario in 2006.  The only real good I can say about their system is that they stabilized me and I didn't die.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 3:34:02 AM EDT
I live in the Texas Hill Country.  Our local hospital fills up every winter with Canadians (no, the real ones from up north and across the border) seeking health care.  I have several close friends who are RNs and Doctors and they say that it is the Canadians who support the hospital during the winter when we don't have the huge influx or river drunks.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 3:40:40 AM EDT
Quoted:
I've broken seventeen bones, had dozens of stitches, wrecked my Patella tendon plus other sicknesses and goofy injuries (from BC). Never had a problem, wait time or issue with any segment of Canadian healthcare. What can I say? I'm not making it up. Always treated well, repaired and sent on my way. My daughter was born in Vancouver and the experience was great. Multiple days in the hospital due to a late C-section cost $0.00.

I now live in the US. I've slowed down a lot the older I've gotten and now have two kids. My son was born in the United States and even with the great insurance we have here our part of the tab was about $6-7000.00 or so. I blew my knee out a few months after I moved here and waited 3 months for surgery and was out of pocket about $4,000.00. Not a complaint and the medical treatment was fine, facilities great but since you asked for an explanation I will say:

I have had no bad experiences back home and out of my circle of family and friends have no horror stories at all.

My insurance premiums here in America are $854.00 / month. I can't speak for people coming to the US for life saving treatment because I haven't been there. I know the heath care system is not perfect in Canada by any means but I hate to see the down and out folks here that have no options for care whereas back home at least they can go see the Doc.




you must be doing it wrong - maybe you picked the cheapest, "SafeAuto" equivalent of health insurance without investigating your options?

We just had a baby boy, 3 days, cesarean, excellent care with the doctor of our choosing...  $150 copay.

Hell - I paid less out of pocket for six months of chemotherapy as a single white male than you did for childbirth?  

And unlike in Canada (or Mexico, or Cuba, or Venezuela) - I'm still here to bitch about it.  
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 3:48:11 AM EDT
Imagine the wonderful quality care you would get if the post office or DMV administered our health care system.



It would make Canada's look spectacular.



But don't worry, Obamacare is coming.




Link Posted: 4/29/2011 3:56:19 AM EDT
I worked for a company in Canada and in the Canadian health system.  Their "advanced" care is not all that impressive.  It's spread pretty thin and would certainly be considered sub-par compared to any decent tertiary hospital in the States.  More importantly, the waiting list system is a death sentence for many.    

There's a reason many Canucks with the cash DO come here.  I saw one yesterday––she's quite bitter about their system at home.  She said that the resource rationing kills people.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 4:30:00 AM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
Serioulsy overblown smack talk on the system and our costs per taxpayer, non emergency surgeries have to wait as they should. I have two sisters one in MN one in GA take the cost of private insurance add it to your income taxes and it equals out as far as tax rates go!!!

Its not overblown smack talk. Its a broken and getting worse. And this is only after 50ish years of being implemented.

The system is currently just able to deal with critical things, such as heart attack and to a lesser extent cancer treatments, quite well. Chronic things such as joint replacement, anything that isn't life threatening, good luck you are on a waiting list.

You tell someone in pain everyday that they are lucky their wait list for hip or knee replacement is 2 years.

But the kicker is its illegal to jump cue. You can't within the Canadian system say, "ok, screw it, I'm going to pay for faster treatment". So there you sit like a good little Canadian waiting for the Government to tell you its your turn to be blessed with what little they are going to meter out your way.

Hence, you have people getting frustrated and paying out of pocket to have their procedures done in the US or abroad. (Our politicians are even doing it which tells you something besides being incredibly funny)

There is no such thing as "free" health care. There sure is such a thing called socialist sense of entitlement though. Like the "I pay taxes so I'm entitled to my free health care". Hence you get ERs plugged with people with sniffles and a top heavy bureaucratic system with no capacity.

Disturbing to me of late is more and more the arguement "well, your health care is paid by everyone" to justify labelling something or some activity as "risky", so therefore we must think of banning it. Personal choice and personal responsibilty are more and more a foreign concept in Canada.


The part in red.  That's everywhere and it will be our downfall.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 4:32:18 AM EDT
My step-dad is from there. His brother died from MS, had absolutely no problems getting treatment when he needed it with no waits. His dad is in the hospital now for an ulcer, having no problems either.

His sister came down here for some non-important thing though.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 4:38:53 AM EDT
Quoted:
They don't close on the weekends. Seriously. Is there a way to ignore all posts from the midwest?Anyways Canadian healthcare can suck.

I broke my arm in Canada when I was working there as a U.S. Citizen. I was treated very well, the wait times in the ER were less than a typical US metro, they didn't want to see my insurance card. After about an hour and a half the bone was set, the cast was on, and I was sent packing with a smile from the staff, no bill.

I am sure if I needed a kidney it would have been a different story. Though this was in Quebec. I think they may have it MUCH better than the brits, but that could just be population density related.

ETA: One of the reasons our little brothers and sisters come stateside is because we have more specialists. Another racket.


Welcome, you're the first person on my ignore list.

In Republican America, Midwest ignores you!
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 4:40:38 AM EDT
Quoted:
The way it works is each Province has their own health system, wait times vary per Province for various surgeries.

I have no problems and have not, my mother had 2 Cardiac arrests and a mild stroke 2 years ago they saved her life and cost an ambulance ride.

The last time i went to emerg for stiches in and out in 30 min.

Serioulsy overblown smack talk on the system and our costs per taxpayer, non emergency surgeries have to wait as they should. I have two sisters one in MN one in GA take the cost of private insurance add it to your income taxes and it equals out as far as tax rates go!!!


The difference being that non-emergent procedures are dealt with in a few days here, rather than years.

And we can finance boob jobs, too.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 4:51:34 AM EDT
This article kinda says it all to me.

Being from Michigan, we get MASSIVE amounts of Canadians seeking quick, effective healthcare they can't get within reasonable periods of time in Canada.

http://www.freep.com/article/20090820/BUSINESS06/908200420/Canadians-visit-U-S-get-health-care
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:04:15 AM EDT
One of my surgeons is Canadian.  His father was a cardiologist in Canada.



He has *nothing* good to say about the Canadian health care system and believes our country made a grave mistake.  



I've spent a fair amount of time in Argentina which also has socialized medicine.  The people with money buy private insurance and go to private doctors.  If you want to die slowly or enjoy infections, you go to the Medico Publico.  I learned all I need to know about socialized medicine at the Medico Publico.          
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:11:30 AM EDT
So tell me, what would you say was so different with the treatment and experience than if it had happened mere miles across the border in the US? Serious question.

Quoted:
I got hit by a tractor trailer while driving my car home from drill weekend outside London  Ontario in 2006.  The only real good I can say about their system is that they stabilized me and I didn't die.


Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:19:18 AM EDT
Quoted:

Quoted:
Long waits for serious things. Just what I have heard from Canadians that I've met.


My parents live in BC. My dad needs a hip replacement. He is waiting to get on the waiting list, to get the surgery. Its been almost 2 years now.

Yes, you read that right. The "waiting list" is artificially limited in size so that the delay is hidden.




And THAT is my biggest concern. The life-saving stuff you might get because it's obviously serious (yes, I know, you *might* get it on time), but what about the next level down? My wife had an experimental hip surgery when she was 11 or 12. She has known since that time that she will need a hip replacement before 50 (we're 34 now) and possibly another after that.  I would imagine that all goes out the window under a system such as this.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:20:09 AM EDT

Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:20:48 AM EDT




Canada was "hope and change" before hope and change was cool.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:22:45 AM EDT
Not the cheapest. When I moved here I investigated many options and told my insurance agent that I don't care what it costs and I wanted the best insurance available. It went up from $634.00 / month to the current premium after knee surgery and childbirth. I can't compare my costs to yours. I'm glad you have excellent coverage that works for you. I've currently set up a health care plan for my employees which I'll be a part of as well which will bring my premiums down a lot.

The point of the post was to point out that I have no complaints with the CDN healthcare system after a bunch of injuries. It seems that the complaints about it come from people with zero experience with it other than news / television.


Quoted:
Quoted:
I've broken seventeen bones, had dozens of stitches, wrecked my Patella tendon plus other sicknesses and goofy injuries (from BC). Never had a problem, wait time or issue with any segment of Canadian healthcare. What can I say? I'm not making it up. Always treated well, repaired and sent on my way. My daughter was born in Vancouver and the experience was great. Multiple days in the hospital due to a late C-section cost $0.00.

I now live in the US. I've slowed down a lot the older I've gotten and now have two kids. My son was born in the United States and even with the great insurance we have here our part of the tab was about $6-7000.00 or so. I blew my knee out a few months after I moved here and waited 3 months for surgery and was out of pocket about $4,000.00. Not a complaint and the medical treatment was fine, facilities great but since you asked for an explanation I will say:

I have had no bad experiences back home and out of my circle of family and friends have no horror stories at all.

My insurance premiums here in America are $854.00 / month. I can't speak for people coming to the US for life saving treatment because I haven't been there. I know the heath care system is not perfect in Canada by any means but I hate to see the down and out folks here that have no options for care whereas back home at least they can go see the Doc.




you must be doing it wrong - maybe you picked the cheapest, "SafeAuto" equivalent of health insurance without investigating your options?

We just had a baby boy, 3 days, cesarean, excellent care with the doctor of our choosing...  $150 copay.

Hell - I paid less out of pocket for six months of chemotherapy as a single white male than you did for childbirth?  

And unlike in Canada (or Mexico, or Cuba, or Venezuela) - I'm still here to bitch about it.  


Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:26:58 AM EDT
My family is from Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.

My uncle died of a gall bladder problems.  It wasn't bad enough to get fixed right away.  Then it was too bad to transport to S. Ontario where the specialist for serious cases is.  He died because of a waiting list.

My Aunt needed a new hip.  She waited 2 years to get her hip.  In that time she went from "in pain" to "immobile" thanks to the waiting list.

My mom in the U.S. had both proceedures done.  In both cases it was under two weeks from "I want to have it done" to "done".

Thanks to taxes my Canadian relatives with similar jobs as my U.S. relatives have a lower standard of living.  But they have free health care that allows them to die while warting for service.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:27:44 AM EDT
Quoted:
They tout it like it's the best thing ever yet thousands of our brothers from the north come to the U.S. seeking life saving along with routine treatments.

Please explain this.


their .gov touts it as the best thing, but every canadian (actual consumers) I have talked to indept about their health system says it sucks.

we do alot of fishing in canada and thus get to talk to alot of the "common" man in tackle shops, dinners, small hotels etc.

J-

Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:29:37 AM EDT
Quoted:
I learned all I need to know about socialized medicine at the Medico Publico.          


It was probably more of a confirmation of previously held belief than education, right?
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:36:21 AM EDT
My father lives in a town of 50,000 250 miles north of Toronto. The closest MRI machine is 100 miles away and a 6 month wait. It is illegal to purchase an MRI machine and sell the scans privately.



Imagine this: You are 82 years old and have an appointment at 8AM, January 25th, 100 miles away for an MRI. You wake up at 5AM and it is snowing like hell. If you miss your appointment you will have another 6 month wait.
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 5:37:18 AM EDT
Quoted:
Quoted:
They tout it like it's the best thing ever yet thousands of our brothers from the north come to the U.S. seeking life saving along with routine treatments.

Please explain this.


their .gov touts it as the best thing, but every canadian (actual consumers) I have talked to indept about their health system says it sucks.

we do alot of fishing in canada and thus get to talk to alot of the "common" man in tackle shops, dinners, small hotels etc.

J-



Yeah, although anecdotal, I go to Roseland Golf outside Windsor now and then.  Everytime this subject comes up, the Canadians always say their healthcare plan sucks.
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