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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 1/18/2006 12:31:18 PM EDT

Granted, it's a 40 year-old house. Will removing them and putting screws in their place work? What kind of screws?
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:33:00 PM EDT
How bout drywall screws??
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:33:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:
Granted, it's a 40 year-old house. Will removing them and putting screws in their place work? What kind of screws?



drywall screws?
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:34:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/18/2006 12:38:45 PM EDT by jthuang]
Yeah, "nail pops" are a fact of life.

Recommendation is to use drywall screws instead. Remove the popped nail and put the screws in. Now some people say you can just put the screw in the same place as the nail but I like to put them either above or below the original nail hole. It'll all get covered up by the tape/mud (or spackle, depending on what you're doing) so I don't know if it makes much of a difference.

Also, it helps to have the special drywall screw adaptor for your power drill; I think DeWalt and other big toolmakers offer them. [ETA: check out this one by Bosch]
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:34:15 PM EDT
Whoaaaaa!

I am having the exact problem in my house. Part of the ceiling in my garage fell down, I think
it is part the house shifting.

My house was built in 1974
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:35:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By chas_martel:
Whoaaaaa!

I am having the exact problem in my house. Part of the ceiling in my garage fell down, I think
it is part the house shifting.

My house was built in 1974



Tell your Mother-in-law that it is time for her to move out!
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:36:28 PM EDT
The wood is moving around, expanding, contracting, etc.

Just sink the hell out of the nails with a framing hammer. Cover the cat face marks with some sheetrock mud, prime and paint.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:39:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BiggyD:
How bout drywall screws??



wait a minute. Dumba question of the day - what is the difference between sheetrock & drywall, and which do I have for my interior walls?
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:41:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:

Originally Posted By BiggyD:
How bout drywall screws??



wait a minute. Dumba question of the day - what is the difference between sheetrock & drywall,


the same

and which do I have for my interior walls?

lathe and plaster?
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:43:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/18/2006 12:45:54 PM EDT by jthuang]
They are interchangeable. Your interior walls are most likely standard drywall (or sheetrock). People from the UK or Australia call them gyp rock (as in gypsum).

You should be using standard drywall for interior walls (not ceilings -- they are thicker!) unless you are talking about a wall in a room that may be subject to moisture (e.g. a bathroom) in which case you want the sheetrock with the green paper backing. The "regular" sheetrock will have white paper backing. The green backed drywall is NOT waterproof so if you're going to be laying tile over it (in an area that will encounter moisture) I highly recommend you use Hardi-backer board.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:43:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:

Originally Posted By BiggyD:
How bout drywall screws??



wait a minute. Dumba question of the day - what is the difference between sheetrock & drywall, and which do I have for my interior walls?



Nothing. Sheetrock or Drywall.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:48:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jthuang:
They are interchangeable. Your interior walls are most likely standard drywall (or sheetrock). People from the UK or Australia call them gyp rock (as in gypsum).

You should be using standard (1/4"?) drywall for interior walls (not ceilings!) unless you are talking about a wall in a room that may be subject to moisture (e.g. a bathroom) in which case you want the sheetrock with the green paper backing. The "regular" sheetrock will have white paper backing. The green backed drywall is NOT waterproof so if you're going to be laying tile over it (in an area that will encounter moisture) I highly recommend you use Hardi-backer board.




Don't use 1/4" use 1/2" if you re-do something, if it is just nail pops put a drywall screw or two next to it and then pull out the nail and fill with mud. Sheetrock is a brand name (USG,United States Gypsum makes it) of drywall.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:54:48 PM EDT
Standard board for ceilings and walls is 1/2 " some codes call for 5/8 " on ceilings and exterior walls. 1/4" board is a specialty product or used in low end things like trailer houses. if you have nail pops pull the nail out, do not drive it back in and sink a 1 1/4 drywall/sheet rock/gypsumboard screw close to it. then re mud. I would advise against using green board in wet areas spend a few dollars more for Dense Sheild as Green Board is little different from regular board other than being green and doesnt hold up to moisture very well at all.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:56:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/18/2006 12:57:23 PM EDT by ar-wrench]
Sheetrock is available in many configutations. 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", 5/8" and probably more.

Also available pre finished. And lengths 8', 9', 10', 12' and more.

Paper faced, fiberglass faced, and water resistant face (wetrock).

Drywall screws are manganese phosphate coated, just like your AR barrel.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:57:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Standard board for ceilings and walls is 1/2 " some codes call for 5/8 " on ceilings and exterior walls. 1/4" board is a specialty product or used in low end things like trailer houses. if you have nail pops pull the nail out, do not drive it back in and sink a 1 1/4 drywall/sheet rock/gypsumboard screw close to it. then re mud. I would advise against using green board in wet areas spend a few dollars more for Dense Sheild as Green Board is little different from regular board other than being green and doesnt hold up to moisture very well at all.




I agree
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 12:59:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Standard board for ceilings and walls is 1/2 " some codes call for 5/8 " on ceilings and exterior walls. 1/4" board is a specialty product or used in low end things like trailer houses. if you have nail pops pull the nail out, do not drive it back in and sink a 1 1/4 drywall/sheet rock/gypsumboard screw close to it. then re mud. I would advise against using green board in wet areas spend a few dollars more for Dense Sheild as Green Board is little different from regular board other than being green and doesnt hold up to moisture very well at all.



1/4" is commonly used as an overlay for deteriorated walls. The 3/8 is what was used in older mobil homes, they now use 1/2".
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:00:32 PM EDT
+100 on drywall sinker bit


Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:00:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ar-wrench:

Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Standard board for ceilings and walls is 1/2 " some codes call for 5/8 " on ceilings and exterior walls. 1/4" board is a specialty product or used in low end things like trailer houses. if you have nail pops pull the nail out, do not drive it back in and sink a 1 1/4 drywall/sheet rock/gypsumboard screw close to it. then re mud. I would advise against using green board in wet areas spend a few dollars more for Dense Sheild as Green Board is little different from regular board other than being green and doesnt hold up to moisture very well at all.



1/4" is commonly used as an overlay for deteriorated walls. The 3/8 is what was used in older mobil homes, they now use 1/2".





And round shit.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:02:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
I would advise against using green board in wet areas spend a few dollars more for Dense Sheild as Green Board is little different from regular board other than being green and doesnt hold up to moisture very well at all.



Is that the yellow-backed drywall or is that like Hardi-backer/cement board?
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:21:38 PM EDT
The word "Sheetrock" is a trademark.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:23:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By RegisteredVoter:
The word "Sheetrock" is a trademark.



yep
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:26:17 PM EDT
Just as a note of interest, when my buddy Ted and I were doing drywall, in every place that needed a screw, we would place two drywall screws about 2 inches apart, instead of just one screw. This really "sucks" the drywall up to the studs and prevents back-out that you are experiencing.

IMHO, drywall screws have made drywall nails obsolete.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:28:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:
IMHO, drywall screws have made drywall nails obsolete.



+1
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:30:25 PM EDT
Are these new nail pops?
40 year old houses don't start popping nails for no reason. You need to look for other problems too. Roof leaks, gutters that are dumping into your foundation causing sinkage, termites, carpenter ants, etc.
Dude, based on your other posts, you need to get out of there.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:31:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/18/2006 1:31:40 PM EDT by BigT]
The obvious source of your problem is you've been walking around with a large neodymium magnet in your pocket.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:33:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/18/2006 1:34:27 PM EDT by Old_Painless]

Originally Posted By postpostban:
Are these new nail pops?
40 year old houses don't start popping nails for no reason.



The reason is that they are 40 years old.


(It's very common for older houses to start to pop nails.)
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:34:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:
Just as a note of interest, when my buddy Ted and I were doing drywall, in every place that needed a screw, we would place two drywall screws about 2 inches apart, instead of just one screw. This really "sucks" the drywall up to the studs and prevents back-out that you are experiencing.

IMHO, drywall screws have made drywall nails obsolete.



+1

I won't permit any nails on my site, period. Same with gate valves, galvanized pipe, and structural wood (but that last one is just me, I hate wood for anything but ascetic finishing)

I bought a 1969 fixer in college and learned the hard way what happens we you cheap out on materials.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:34:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:37:36 PM EDT
Put in a screw about an inch above or below the nail, then use a nail set and re set the nails. Mud over the holes, sand, repaint, the WHOLE wall.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:38:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By postpostban:
Are these new nail pops?
40 year old houses don't start popping nails for no reason. You need to look for other problems too. Roof leaks, gutters that are dumping into your foundation causing sinkage, termites, carpenter ants, etc.
Dude, based on your other posts, you need to get out of there.



+1 we're doing the work in prep to sale. Actuall,y they are the original screws so I'm not worried.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:40:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By postpostban:
Are these new nail pops?
40 year old houses don't start popping nails for no reason. You need to look for other problems too. Roof leaks, gutters that are dumping into your foundation causing sinkage, termites, carpenter ants, etc.
Dude, based on your other posts, you need to get out of there.



Umm.... 20 y/o houses will pop nails for no greater reason than constantly changing seasons.

My brother had the nails in his L/R sweat rust into the paint because the cheap contractor used plain drywall nails, not galvanized. Living in AL, with consistent 95% humidity, galvanized or coated anchors are a necessity.

The nails in my house are 20+ years old and are popping everywhere there is drywall (remodel of a 70+ y/o home). I intend to remove them and . . . well . . . screw it.

Leaks, etc. are one reason for an absolutely new home to have popped nails, but if your contractor was so cheap as to use nails instead of screws then you are GOING to have MAJOR problems with everything in your home.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:52:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/18/2006 1:52:53 PM EDT by cduarte]

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:

Originally Posted By postpostban:
Are these new nail pops?
40 year old houses don't start popping nails for no reason.



The reason is that they are 40 years old.


(It's very common for older houses to start to pop nails.)



older houses don't have drywall, post WW2 construction isn't old...
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:27:05 AM EDT
I am currently refinishing my basement. When I did the sheetrock, I used screws and faced the studs with some of that nifty Power Grab (liquid nails like) stuff.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:37:17 AM EDT
drywall screws.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 7:45:28 AM EDT
If they are coming from a wall that has a door that typically slams or closes hard, you might want to get that under control.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 8:16:02 AM EDT
Aren't you supposed to use screws for drywall?
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